#1
Ok so my friend just bought his first guitar (without asking me anything) and he bought a guitar with a floyd rose... he didnt even know that he bought a floyd rose and he cant return the guitar anymore and broke two strings. Anyway today he came over to my house with his guitar to change his strings, i knew almost nothing about floyd roses so i checked something on internet and i changed the strings. Now when i replaced the strings and when i got them to tune, the bridge is very high and i dont get it how to make the bridge go down (i never had a guitar with tremolo). What am i doing wrong ?
1. First i removed the locking nuts and removed the broken strings...
2. Then i took new strings (cut the ball at the end of the string) and placed them on the bridge
3. Then i tuned them.
Did i miss something, am i doing something wrong ? (also it took forever to get them in tune)
PLEASE HELP !!!
#2
You need to figure out a few things. String gauge. Did you change all the strings or just the broken ones? Did you use the same gauge that was on it? That will make a difference on any trem loaded guitar - including floyd rose instruments. Secondly, what did you tune the guitar to? If it was set up for low tuning, and you tuned it to E standard, yeah that bridge is gunna be yanking up like crazy.

Also, knowing what kind of guitar it is would help a lot as well. Behind the plate on the back of the guitar, if you open it up, you'll see some springs. How many springs does it have? You should find some screws and what not that you can tighten as well to help.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#3
I bet your friend is really starting to regret buying a guitar with a floyd, having absolutely no idea what a floyd even is. If he isn't now, it won't take long before he does later. Floyd Rose bridges are designed in such a way that doesn't make it easy for novices to set up themselves.

What gauge of strings was your friend using before they broke? What gauge are the new strings? That's important to know because if the gauge of the strings change, the springs in the back of the guitar have to be completely re-adjusted.

Loosen the strings off slightly and tighten the springs in the back of the guitar until the bridge sits level with the plane of the body. Then re-tune the guitar. Then adjust the springs. Then re-tune. Repeat ad nauseum until the bridge is level with the body, and the guitar is in tune on all strings. You'll need to adjust the springs and re-tune several times to get it right.

If the bridge is tilted too far forwards, yet the screws that screw the spring claw into the back of the guitar are screwed all the way in, then you need to add more springs and try again.

You'll notice that adjusting the tuning of one string will adjust the tuning of all the other strings. If you tune one string up to pitch, the other 5 will go flat. You'll find that you'll need to keep retuning the same strings over and over, getting closer and closer to perfect pitch. And then at that point, you may find that the bridge is no longer level with the body, which means adjusting the springs in the back of the guitar, and undoing all the work you've done with trying to tune everything up!

This is what makes the bridge frustrating to set up for beginners. And this isn't even considering adjusting the guitar's intonation. Which you will probably need to do as well given that you've probably restrung the guitar with a heavier gauge than what was originally on there.

Adjusting the intonation requires completely loosening the string you want to adjust the intonation on, undoing the small bolt on the front of the bridge that holds the saddle onto the baseplate, sliding the saddle back and forth to where you think the string will intonate properly, tightening down the bolt, and retuning the string again. Then check the intonation. If the intonation on the string is still out, you need to repeat the same steps ad nauseum until you get it right.

It is really important to know that if you want to adjust the guitar's action, never adjust the height of the studs that adjust the bridge height without loosening off all the strings and taking the springs out first. Adjusting those studs with the strings under full tension will damage the knife edges (the areas where the bridge pivots on the studs) and the bridge will never stay in tune again no matter how well you set it up.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at May 27, 2015,
#4
Well i dont know what gauge the strings were at the beginning because they were the original strings from the store and he doesnt even have a clue what gauge they were... i only replaced the two strings that broke, not all of them... also the guitar is a Performer JD-90F/P... and i tuned it to standard e tuning. Does this help ?
#5
Do you have a set of calipers to measure the diameter of the old strings on the guitar? Although chances are the strings that are on the guitar are 9-42's. That's the most common gauge that guitars come with out of the factory.

I recommend 10-46, simply because they don't feel so loose and floppy, and they also don't tend to break so easily. Considering that the strings need adjusting anyway, you may as well use them. The truss rod might need a bit of a tweak to get the neck relief correct, but if you already know a little bit about setting up guitars, you should already know how to adjust it.

I always suggest entirely re-stringing the guitar the moment you buy it from the store since guitars are typically kept in storage for long periods of time before being sold, so the condition of the strings have most likely deteriorated. Trying to set up the guitar with old strings is pointless because you're going to want to replace the strings soon anyway.
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#6
Here is how to fix this. Tell him to take it to a guitar tech. And have it set up correctly for desired string gauge size and tuning. Then slap your friend for buying a guitar with a floyd rose. Then tell him to find a teacher who can not only teach him how to play, but also how to maintain and care for his instrument.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#7
I wouldn't bother taking the guitar to a tech. Why pay for something you can do yourself for free with the help of online guides? Who wants to have to pay someone to set a guitar up whenever you want to just restring their guitar?

There are thousands of guides on YouTube on how to set up this sort of thing. If I was lazy, I would just slap a Floyd Rose setup video on my post and be done with it.
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#8
Its an easy setup.

1. loosen the locking nut, the detune the strings quite a bit.


2. open the back of the guitar with a screwdriver, not the compartment with the electronics where you're knobs are, the other part with the trem springs.


3. There will be a claw with 2 screws that the trem springs are attached to, tighten these to screws several turns each.

4. flip the guitar over and tune up, the bridge will now sit lower than before.


repeat 3 and 4 until the bridge floats parallel to the body.


Keep in mind that because the bridge floats, when 1 string is tuned up or down, the rest do the opposite to compensate for the weight that is taken off of the springs. Meaning that it is harder to tune than a normal bridge and takes a bit longer as you have to keep tuning all of the strings over and over until its perfect.

I use my floating trems a lot, they are worth having once you learn how to use them, granted floating trem techniques fit with your style.


If he bought a cheap guitar with a licensed floyd, its more than likely crap and wont stay in tune well, however. good floyds wont go out of tune for quite a while, even when abused.
#9
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I wouldn't bother taking the guitar to a tech. Why pay for something you can do yourself for free with the help of online guides? Who wants to have to pay someone to set a guitar up whenever you want to just restring their guitar?

There are thousands of guides on YouTube on how to set up this sort of thing. If I was lazy, I would just slap a Floyd Rose setup video on my post and be done with it.


Obviously, they should learn how to do it - that isn't a question. However, Youtube is not a replacement for a skilled and knowledgeable tech. Every guitarist should have a tech that they can trust.

Plus, we don't even know what the guitar was like when he bought it off the shelf before the strings broke. And I don't think a novice musician has enough perspective to determine how well it was set up to begin with. It could have been a mess before this issue even arose. It's better to have the thing properly set up in order that the owner of the instrument has a better understand of what the baseline is supposed to be like. Just because it is in tune and the FR isn't popping out of the body doesn't mean it is set up right.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#10
I never needed a tech to tell me how to set one up. I learned through online guides and my own initiative.

I'm not disagreeing that the guitar needs to be set up whatsoever, but there are so many great guides out there that it just seems silly to me to pay somebody to explain to me exactly what a free guide would say. There's a good chance that the guy teaching you learned from reading an online guide anyway. Knowing what is and what isn't set up correctly is precisely what the guides teach you.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at May 27, 2015,
#11
Hey guys, thanks for all the anwsers, anyway i found this tutorial, but i dont know if it is safe to do this. At 2:30 he puts a pile of picks to block the tremolo so he can tune it without repeating it a lot of times. Is this method fine ? It seems simple...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNNAVzS3cS4
#12
Quote by markoizjaske
Hey guys, thanks for all the anwsers, anyway i found this tutorial, but i dont know if it is safe to do this. At 2:30 he puts a pile of picks to block the tremolo so he can tune it without repeating it a lot of times. Is this method fine ? It seems simple...


You DO want to block the tremolo. Rather than picks, however, most of us end up with a perfect piece of wood for our guitars that we can jam in there and block the trem for quick string changes. I've also used (and continue to do so) a stack of post-it notes (you can peel off post-its until the stack is just the right height). Picks might be a bit problematic if they slip and slide.

Floyds aren't a PIA after you learn how to work with them, but they'll certainly seem that way until you do.
#13
Quote by markoizjaske
Hey guys, thanks for all the anwsers, anyway i found this tutorial, but i dont know if it is safe to do this. At 2:30 he puts a pile of picks to block the tremolo so he can tune it without repeating it a lot of times. Is this method fine ? It seems simple...

The video's right, though as dspellman points out, there are better choices of material to block with. It seems simple because it is - that's why it's the best way to deal with this task
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