#1
When I've got a nice rhythm going with open chords I I just mute with my thumb like on a D I mute the E and A and have always been able to since learning. I try to hit the bottom 4 strings sometimes hit the muted A but If I concentrate to much I lose the nice feel to the rhythm. I've always had a layer back approach to guitar should I be muting or should I learn to not use my thumb for doing this.
#2
Ive been wondering recently if I should bar the 6th string to mute it for bar chords that require the first 5 strings. It's more difficult to do that, but easier sliding to bar chords of different shapes I find

Sorry I can't answer your question. I'm trying to understand how you can even reach the top two strings with your thumb. On my guitar practically impossible
#3
Quote by BassBen93
When I've got a nice rhythm going with open chords I I just mute with my thumb like on a D I mute the E and A and have always been able to since learning. I try to hit the bottom 4 strings sometimes hit the muted A but If I concentrate to much I lose the nice feel to the rhythm. I've always had a layer back approach to guitar should I be muting or should I learn to not use my thumb for doing this.

Yeah, if you're playing cowboy chords just mute the lowest strings when necessary. An awkward strumming angle will only distract you and the D chord, if anything, benefits from the extra thump of the muted strings.
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#4
I do the same thing and encourage my students to do the same. If you're muting the unwanted strings then you don't need to worry about avoiding them when you strum, so you can just strum away to your heart's content keep doing what you're doing.
#5
Cheers guys. And I have big hands which I found hard for awkward chords at first but never had to struggle with the D chord die to my muting with my thumb. See pros and cons for everything. I have to use middle ring and pinky for my A chords and A shape barre I mute the high E as cramming fingers into such small space is just unrealistic in my eyes. If I need the high e (which isn't needed most of the time in that chord) I barre with pinky and bend it to make it ring.
#6
I got told it's bad to have half the pick showing for strumming but I find it perfect it has movement the to glide over the strings. Especially with thicker picks. Otherwise it just gets caught up and sound horrid and harsh. Only time I hold pick further than halfway down is whe I'm picking single notes out.
#7
maybe because your thumb should be behind the neck, could you mute it with the top of your pinky instead of wrapping your hand around the neck?
#8
Quote by zackbreslin25
maybe because your thumb should be behind the neck, could you mute it with the top of your pinky instead of wrapping your hand around the neck?

Nonsense. For fast lead playing thumb behind neck is worth doing. For cowboy chords wrapping it round is usually more comfortable and a better option.

Different situations call for different hand positions.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at May 27, 2015,
#9
Quote by K33nbl4d3
Nonsense. For fast lead playing thumb behind neck is worth doing. For cowboy chords wrapping it round is usually more comfortable and a better option.

Different situations call for different hand positions.


not really, it's damages your hand.
#10
I could probably use my pinky but it's no effort to use my thumb it has never hurt my hand or wrist and it's my wrist that I've broke before so I'm sure it's fine.

And I tried stretching my pinky from a d chord to mute but that is by far more painful tgan just moving my hand round the neck more.
#11
Quote by zackbreslin25
not really, it's damages your hand.


care to back that up with something? i move my hand position all the time to suite whatever i'm playing. for speedy runs thumb behind headstock classical style is the way to go. thumb over the top for "R&R style works great for many things. why limit yourself.

as for the original ? i do a bit of both. being accurate comes in time but often muting is easier and more practical.
#12
Yeah I can be accurate if it comes to picking separate strings or 2 strings and stuff if I have to be careful. But strumming I just go for it.
#13
Wrapping the thumb around the neck to fret and mute notes is a great technique - Hendrix was the one who really popularized it. Stevie Ray Vaughan was incredible at this as well - check his strumming hand when playing rhythm and lead- it's amazing - he strums nearly everything but only the right notes ring out.

Properly muting notes is really what separates great players from terrible ones - so it's good that you're paying attention to that element of your playing.