#1
I just started to learn to read music on the guitar and im having some problem counting the rhythm while playing. I am using a metronome and my question is should i count 1 2 3 4 or should i subdivide and count 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and.
#2
Using subdivisions does help, but the less clicks you need per bar to keep tempo, the better.

In this video Victor starts with a drum loop, but in the end there's just one beat every four bars, and he can still play really complex stuff and keep the tempo pretty well. Crappy quality but whatever. The whole video was on Youtube some time ago (with good quality) but it's been taken down.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKPYiCgCpBU
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#3
Quote by Darkn3ss99
I just started to learn to read music on the guitar and im having some problem counting the rhythm while playing. I am using a metronome and my question is should i count 1 2 3 4 or should i subdivide and count 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and.


I think it makes sense to be aware of the "and". When I teach it, I explain it like tapping your foot and counting 1 2 3 4 on each tap, but when you lift your foot and it's at its highest point before coming down again, I have them say "and".

It helps to go slowly, and get used to thinking about it, by saying it out loud. Using and, keeps you committed to time (as does a metronome) when you don't have a metronome, and it's just good practice.

If you really want to practice an idea that will help you to be more aware of the "and", I'd also suggest a slow reggae beat, where you count out loud but only strike the chord on the "and"s, and immediately mute it as you count the number.

A simple Am chord, will get you the best effect if you're just starting out on guitar.

If you are just learning to read music, and trying to put the two together (playing in time), I would not suggest that you start with a metronome, Instead I'd suggest going slowly enough to be in control of the count (and count it out loud rhythmically), and, working one bar/measure out at a time. First making sure that you can count it, then apply the notes to that rhythm, practicing them, and then connecting the measures together.

It takes a while at first, but it will pay off. It will also make you more rhythmically aware, and when you start using the metronome after that, it will pay bigger dividends.

By the way, David Oakes, in his book Music Reading for Guitar has a pretty neat approach to counting rhythms out loud, and is a great book for learning to read, and count/feel rhythms.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at May 28, 2015,
#4
Quote by Sean0913
I think it makes sense to be aware of the "and". When I teach it, I explain it like tapping your foot and counting 1 2 3 4 on each tap, but when you lift your foot and it's at its highest point before coming down again, I have them say "and".

It helps to go slowly, and get used to thinking about it, by saying it out loud. Using and, keeps you committed to time (as does a metronome) when you don't have a metronome, and it's just good practice.

If you really want to practice an idea that will help you to be more aware of the "and", I'd also suggest a slow reggae beat, where you count out loud but only strike the chord on the "and"s, and immediately mute it as you count the number.

A simple Am chord, will get you the best effect if you're just starting out on guitar.

If you are just learning to read music, and trying to put the two together (playing in time), I would not suggest that you start with a metronome, Instead I'd suggest going slowly enough to be in control of the count (and count it out loud rhythmically), and, working one bar/measure out at a time. First making sure that you can count it, then apply the notes to that rhythm, practicing them, and then connecting the measures together.

It takes a while at first, but it will pay off. It will also make you more rhythmically aware, and when you start using the metronome after that, it will pay bigger dividends.

By the way, David Oakes, in his book Music Reading for Guitar has a pretty neat approach to counting rhythms out loud, and is a great book for learning to read, and count/feel rhythms.

Best,

Sean

Lol thats the book im working out of right now. I can read music and i know the notes on the guitar, its just learning to play ryhthm. Another question i have is how do i mute eigth rests?
#6
Just throwing it out there, if you are having problems reading rhythmic notation, you might want to give the Takadimi system a try. I had a drum teacher in college who were very fond of this system of teaching reading skills in regards to rhythm, and it helped many of us who were lousy readers (including myself).

Simply put it is a method of giving syllables to different note values and groupings. It should not be used permanently, but i found it helped a lot when starting out/developing my reading skills. There are a lot of resources on the web about it, i would suggest you at least take a look.
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