#1
So here's my problem when i'm trying to come up with a major chord progression...

for example the chords would be 1 4 5 in a Amajor but then i add a gmajor chord to it sounds good


but it's not part of the scale???


i'm having a hard time getting this down...
#2
That's what's known as "modal interchange."

This is when you borrow chords from the parallel minor (or, less frequently, major) scale.

I IV V in A major = A D E.

G (major triad) = bVII of A minor.

It's a really great compositional device.
"No one is a sorcerer every hour of the day. How could you live?" — Pablo Picasso
#3
Quote by Tonto Goldstien
That's what's known as "modal interchange."

This is when you borrow chords from the parallel minor (or, less frequently, major) scale.

I IV V in A major = A D E.

G (major triad) = bVII of A minor.

It's a really great compositional device.



So the gmajor would be from the Aminor scale?
#4
Exactly. In general, you readily borrow chords with scale degrees b6, b7, and b3.

The other alternate pitches require a little more finesse.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
It's really common. It's not forbidden to use accidentals. How boring would music be if we were only allowed to stay in one key? (Not saying that good songs haven't been written by staying in one key, but if there were no other possibilities, it would be pretty boring.)

If it sounds good, it is good.

You can borrow chords from the parallel key. Another common way to use "out of key" chords is secondary dominants.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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