#1
I'm going to pick up a bass tomorrow that I'll just be using for recording some songs. I tried out a few $300 ones and liked the LTD B-15 because it sounded and felt good enough. Also only had one volume knob and one tone knob which I liked because of the simplicity.

Will a more expensive bass be significantly/noticeably better sounding? I just don't want to get a cheap one and then realize later that it's not good enough. I'll be using amp sims and recording metal.
#2
If you are comfortable playing the bass you're thinking of recording with, it should also have a fresh set of strings, also be in tune, and have a tone that makes YOU happy. When you have a good tone and it's in tune, the amp Sims you're talking about can help you do any tone shaping you want to do before you put it in the mix.
#3
Yeah, that's a good LTD for the price. If you're shopping locally, try out a Schecter bass or two if the store has them. Also very nice for the price.

Also, yeah, seriously, fresh strings. Fresh as possible for recording. Bass strings have a long period of life when they sound good enough for playing live and jamming, before they just get worn out and dead, but they have a much shorter period when they're brand new that they just sound so perfectly punchy and clear. And you want to record during that time. Makes a huge difference. Like, bring a new set of strings to the recording session, put em on, tune it up, and start recording. If it's a particularly long recording session, with several songs, maybe even do that again halfway through. Bass strings are pricey, but it's worth it for a better sounding bass, at least if you're trying to make a higher quality recording than just a quick demo or something. Plus, if the strings you replace are still in that period where they're not dead yet, but not fresh anymore, just don't cut them, and hold on to them for use later, when you aren't recording.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#4
i use a LTD B50 for recording.(some results found in link in profile) does the job and sounds ok. through amp sims and such you can get away with using cheaper guitars as many of the sims can't really tell the difference.
#5
"Sounding good enough" is an entirely subjective standard. If it sounds good enough to you, then it is definitely "good enough." And a lot of inexpensive basses sound and play plenty good. The LTD B-15 is plenty good; to be sure.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#6
What kind of metal is it? If it's more modern stuff you might want to look at basses with humbuckers or two pickups for a more trebly and cutting time. Have a look at the range of Squier Jaguars.
#7
Well, the most versatile bass for the money would arguably be the Yamaha TRBX304 or 305 if you want a 5-string. It has great pickups and a lot of options with the sound, great for recording. Costs 300 euros over here, 349 dollars on Musician's Friend site.
Gear pics

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#8
Quote by Spaz91
What kind of metal is it? If it's more modern stuff you might want to look at basses with humbuckers or two pickups for a more trebly and cutting time. Have a look at the range of Squier Jaguars.


It's like black metal mostly. I was thinking a more bassy tone but I would have to test it out in a mix to see what works well.