#1
Hi all.

I got a cheap strat type body on Ebay and planned on adding bits to it with the hope of eventually having a playable guitar.

My question is do i need to spend big cash or can i do it cheaply.

I know that pickups and electrics prices can vary wildly but I was wondering about the neck in particular.

The cheapest one I've seen on Ebay is £24 ($37) inc shipping. It's from China and it's North American maple.

Do any of you guys have any success with this kind of gear or would I be better off spending a bit more?

cheers, Marc
#2
It's pretty simple. The more you spend, the better you get. Cheaping out on everything - unless you're capable of doing a lot of very specialised jobs on your own - will result in a crap guitar that not only isn't worth the money you spent (you'll still almost certainly be spending more than you would on a new guitar of equivalent quality) but won't really be a usable guitar. If, instead, you splash out on everything you will certainly be spending a lot more than you would for equivalent specs from a manufacturer, but you'll end up with a good guitar (if you put it together properly) that's exactly what you wanted in the first place.

If it's your first Partscaster attempt it might be worth going as cheap as possible for the experience, but I'd recommend going for at least decent quality parts so you can get something usable out of it or have the parts for a later attempt.
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#3
I've put together a parts-based guitar (not a strat), but did so with two basic used Warmoth parts.
One was a Jackson-replacement neck that wasn't really used (still in the original Warmoth box), but that was already painted and ready to go. $75, as I recall. The other was a body upon which the owner had already started some modifications, but had then abandoned as a project. That was around $$100.

I found a used Floyd, bought some new hardware and had someone paint the body. It was actually built as a pickup test bed, so there's a battery box on the back. But the first set of pickups were a set of Ibanez INFs. The jack is a Neutrik locking panel jack. What's interesting about it is that it locks (your cable can't fall out). Gibson tried this one (two?) years on the Standard, ran into a shitrstorm of protest from their traditionalist customers and abandoned it. It works really well with wireless systems, though.



The body is mahogany with a quilt maple cap (difficult to see in the shot, sorry) and was painted with a dark transparent brownish-burst on the front, black on the back. The neck is maple, fretboard is ebony, but everything is painted black. You'll notice the waterslide decal on the headstock; that was the painter's little surprise.

That's a real five-way; it allows for some interesting wiring choices in the 2 and 4 positions.
Last edited by dspellman at May 30, 2015,
#4
Quote by K33nbl4d3

If it's your first Partscaster attempt it might be worth going as cheap as possible for the experience, but I'd recommend going for at least decent quality parts so you can get something usable out of it or have the parts for a later attempt.



+1. When buying partscaster bits, never assume that the intended project will be the last you use it for. Thus is the cycle of a partscaster junkie.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#5
as a person that fixes and builds guitars (not custom from scratch just builds guitars) i will say it is cool to make creations that far exceed expectations but please never assume you will get anything close to what you put into them on resale. sadly, the market will prove that only guitars with gibson or fender will pay even close to decent resale on them. i have a guitar i built with the highest end parts you can get and a local artist painted it that is basically worthless to everyone accept me and the artist. It was built with utmost care using only the best but it doesn't carry a known brand name on the headstock so that makes it worthless for resale. so i encourage you to build and fix and experiment but never ever expect anyone to give you one red cent over what the cheapest look-a-like piece of crap on craigslist is getting for your build. They are the same as a custom motorcycle or a hotrod, labors of love that mean nothing to anyone but the builder.
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#6
Well, I did a similar thing with my Gibson-era Kramer Pacer (lower end one). Two summers ago, when I graduated high school, I spent about $175 on the neck and body plus another $150 for the electronics. Sure, these particular Kramers only cost about $300 used. I had a fun time doing it, though.
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#8
^^^ Yeah, I always think about different modding options for my guitars. I don't do it as often as I'd like because I'm very frugal/stingy/cheap with my money. It's so bad that even small purchases like getting a few Turkey Hill Iced Teas bother me lol.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#9
holy hell... TURKEY HILL ICED TEA!!!! i grew up in a small little shit town in PA and pretty much used Turkey Hill iced tea as water for the first 22 years of my life. Since moving to Florida back in 1993 i have always pined for a drop of that sweet sweet nectar!
Quote by BlackVoid
Every guitar and bass forum I've visited has some people chasing some magical tone that will shoot jizzing unicorns riding on a rainbow out of their amp.
#10
I guess it's only a Pennsylvania thing, and I'm just finding this out. Pretty sad when you lived in the same exact house your entire life.
Skip the username, call me Billy