#1
Hey y'alls! It's finally June. My birthday is on the 28th and I'm hoping to get a cajon and/or one of those handy-dandy, handheld mobile recording interfaces. I don't have the funds to dive into a professional recording studio, so I'm hoping to convert my family's little camp on the lake into a makeshift studio to record the album's worth of music I've got tucked away.

I can't imagine selling too many copies, and it'll work for what it is. Any tips, ideas?

The music won't have too many bells or whistles. Acoustic guitar, vocals, some bass guitar, cajon percussion (if I end up getting one) and some electric guitar sprinkles.

#2
Recording skill matters if you want good results. If you don't have a lot of skill or experience, find someone who does and bring them into the project.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
Quote by Cajundaddy
Recording skill matters if you want good results. If you don't have a lot of skill or experience, find someone who does and bring them into the project.


Very good point. I've been interning at a recording studio as an engineer since October. I'd much rather just go into the studio and do things right, but lack of funds haunt me... (And I think it'd be fun just to stay for a week or so in a tiny cabin on a beautiful lake trying to make music).
I may just be selfish, but I think I have enough experience to make do with what I have... :P And shit, anything's better than the garbage recordings I've been getting through my laptop mic and Audacity...
#4
Quote by Mainer
Very good point. I've been interning at a recording studio as an engineer since October. I'd much rather just go into the studio and do things right, but lack of funds haunt me... (And I think it'd be fun just to stay for a week or so in a tiny cabin on a beautiful lake trying to make music).
I may just be selfish, but I think I have enough experience to make do with what I have... :P And shit, anything's better than the garbage recordings I've been getting through my laptop mic and Audacity...



An internship in a pro studio is absolutely the best way to learn the ropes. After 6months you should have a good working knowledge and good contacts to solve problems when they come up. Go for it!

A few good mics, a decent interface, and some headphones should take you far.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Quote by Cajundaddy

An internship in a pro studio is absolutely the best way to learn the ropes. After 6months you should have a good working knowledge and good contacts to solve problems when they come up. Go for it!

A few good mics, a decent interface, and some headphones should take you far.

I'd go as far as to say that one good mic will get you really far, but you can probably get two mics with more specific applications for the price of one good one that'll shoulder everything.

What's the full gear plan?
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#6
I'd say get hardware multitrack recorder, I'm a fan of the Zoom R series recorders:
http://www.sweetwater.com/c1008--Zoom--Digital_Multitrack_Recorders

Since you mention cajon so I'd guess you might need condenser mic - try the AT2020, great for the price and start from there. If you can't afford condenser at starter stage the Zoom has a built in mic.

When you're ready to move on to production or mixing/mastering and need more power you can attach this as audio interface to the PC.

If price is too much, look at the older Zoom, Tascam, Korg, etc. multitrackers.