#1
Okay, so I'm incredibly new to chords, I don't have a chord book or anything yet so I've been mostly going off what others say and blindly fumbling.

As I understand it, chord progressions are written depending on the key they're in, with each number (I - II - III - IV - V etc) referring to a note on the scale. But does this mean that you can't use major chords after minor chords? Cause that can sometimes sound nice Can someone explain this to me? I don't really get it...at all. How does an Am fit into key of G?

I'm fine with progressions in which only major chords are used though.

For example, I've been playing around with chords and found that I like the progression of G major to A minor then to F major and then.....idk.....What would be a good chord to continue/finish this sequence with and how would this sequence be written?
Last edited by Serotonite at Jun 2, 2015,
#2
Literally, just play what sounds good. There are no rules in music.

Any chord can be used anywhere at any time. Some just sound better than others.

It doesn't matter. You don't even have to use the chords in a given scale.
ayy lmao
#3
Quote by chookiecookie
Literally, just play what sounds good. There are no rules in music.

Any chord can be used anywhere at any time. Some just sound better than others.

It doesn't matter. You don't even have to use the chords in a given scale.


Okey Dokey. Now for the bigger problem - how do I write a melody to fit with a chord sequence? I can hum something rough alongside a chord sequence but I don't really know the basics of the theory surrounding how to write melodies. Which is a shame seeing as they are usually the most memorable part of a song.
#4
Quote by Serotonite
Okay, so I'm incredibly new to chords, I don't have a chord book or anything yet so I've been mostly going off what others say and blindly fumbling.

As I understand it, chord progressions are written depending on the key they're in, with each number (I - II - III - IV - V etc) referring to a note on the scale. But does this mean that you can't use major chords after minor chords? Cause that can sometimes sound nice Can someone explain this to me? I don't really get it...at all. How does an Am fit into key of G?


so first, lets look at the notes in G major:

G A B C D E F#

the numberings that correspond to this scale's triads are:

I ii iii IV V vi viio

notice that each set of triads in a major key are not all major, like:

ii, which is A minor

iii, B minor

vi, E minor

viio, F# diminished

i would recommend looking up material on intervals, and their relation to chord construction and scale construction. i may potentially put some up here later for you, but once again i'm kinda busy so yeah


For example, I've been playing around with chords and found that I like the progression of G major to A minor then to F major and then.....idk.....What would be a good chord to continue/finish this sequence with and how would this sequence be written?


(F major is not a diatonic chord of G major. not that this is a bad thing, i've played the progression and also agree that it sounds nice. more info later, or alternatively the Musicians Talk forum may provide you a more concise answer than i)