#1
Hey Guys I´ve got myself a Marshall JCM2000 DSL100 and It really fuc...ng rocks and I think it´s a great amp, but I seriously got some issues with the EQ settings... When I´m playing at home it´s everything perfect, but as soon as I play with my Band I can´t really cut through while soloing and playing, I´ve got to turn it loud as hell.

Well I tried to change the EQ settings, but then it sounds not good anymore, really cold and metallic, just not the way I like it, plus it hurts when I´m hitting the high notes...Well I love warm sounds with lots of power and volume.

Anyway Here is my setting

Presence 3, Treble 1, Middle 5-6, Bas 4-6, Lead Channel 2, Gain 3 Volume 1-4 (4 is loud as hell )

As soon as I´m changing the Trebble settings it starts to sound very cold and metallic and well I just don´t like it... also it feels like loosing the thicknes of the sound, especially at high notes!


My Guitar is a Charvel Pro Mod San Dimas ( awesome weapon !!! ) Duncans 4t Bridge, 59 Neck


I´m using a BUDDA Zenman overdrive Pedal / Solo Boost pedal, plus a delay pedal.

BUDDA ZenMan settings are gain about 5- level about 5 / Boost 8, Tone 5


Well Here´s a youtube video with the settings I love to play ! if you like watch it,

I hope you guys can help me out or maybe you could just tell me that I´ve got to play louder in my band ? or should I really play with a sound I don´t like ? well I think it doesn´t make sense.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPwx_Hjnc4c
#3
What other instruments are you playing with?

It doesnt sound like you are doing anything too crazy with your eq, so I dont think thats the problem.

By the way- a volume setting may seem really loud in your bedroom because the room is small; but if youre playing in a bigger room with a full band and the bodies are soaking up the frequencies, its not too crazy of a thing if you really have to turn your volume up.

Another thing to pay attention to is where youre cab is located in the room and where youre standing relative to it. Closed back cabs are ridic directional- you can like blast it, stand behind it, and its no big deal. In front of it will make your ears explode. Try elevating your cab, pointing it upwards, or using some sort of PA setup so the guitar hits everyone smack in the face
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#4
Quote by Watterboy
What other instruments are you playing with?

It doesnt sound like you are doing anything too crazy with your eq, so I dont think thats the problem.

Well yeah that´s what I hoped to hear haha ...

By the way- a volume setting may seem really loud in your bedroom because the room is small; but if youre playing in a bigger room with a full band and the bodies are soaking up the frequencies, its not too crazy of a thing if you really have to turn your volume up.

Hm...we played today and I tried to raise the volume and it sounded really good and I could hear myself...

Another thing to pay attention to is where youre cab is located in the room and where youre standing relative to it. Closed back cabs are ridic directional- you can like blast it, stand behind it, and its no big deal. In front of it will make your ears explode. Try elevating your cab, pointing it upwards, or using some sort of PA setup so the guitar hits everyone smack in the face



Well The room is very small, not perfect for a Bandroom obviously.
Thanks for your tipps, I´ll experiment around, to see what fits best. I think I´ll def. stick with my EQ, because I think it sounds very pleasent and very 80´s kinda rock like... I don´t like those cold sounds
#5
Small room not cutting through the mix...I pretty much agree with Watterboy, tilt the cab so you can hear it better, if you're not able to get 12 feet in front of it the sound is not "opening up" yet, it's probably not hitting your ears, but lower.

Also try cutting back the bass and mids a little, when you get into a band situation let the bass guitar handle the bass, keep enough to let your low notes have some guts but not get muddy. Guitar with too much bass can make everything muddy because it competes with the bass guitar. Also, mids accent bass, I keep the mids usually around 4 or so (but I'm playing a Fender Super Reverb and fairly clean, overdrive pedal instead of amp distortion) I keep bass from 4 to 7 depending on the location, it varies a lot, but again we also play a very low volume level due tot he venues and the bass player is not really heavy.

At home and onstage is always different though, I run lots higher mids and bass at home. I also cut back the distortion level onstage or at band practice, distortion also tends to make things get muddy and hard to cut through the mix. I usually sit on a stool at band practice, so my amp is not pointed at my knees. Onstage I sometimes use the tilt back legs, again it depends on the location.

Main thing I think, cut back bass and mids and distortion a little and see how it works. I was surprised how much I could cut back distortion/saturation with full band and still get what I wanted. These days instead of distortion pedal 90% of the time I'm using the overdrive.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#6
Quote by Paleo Pete
Small room not cutting through the mix...I pretty much agree with Watterboy, tilt the cab so you can hear it better, if you're not able to get 12 feet in front of it the sound is not "opening up" yet, it's probably not hitting your ears, but lower.

Also try cutting back the bass and mids a little, when you get into a band situation let the bass guitar handle the bass, keep enough to let your low notes have some guts but not get muddy. Guitar with too much bass can make everything muddy because it competes with the bass guitar. Also, mids accent bass, I keep the mids usually around 4 or so (but I'm playing a Fender Super Reverb and fairly clean, overdrive pedal instead of amp distortion) I keep bass from 4 to 7 depending on the location, it varies a lot, but again we also play a very low volume level due tot he venues and the bass player is not really heavy.

At home and onstage is always different though, I run lots higher mids and bass at home. I also cut back the distortion level onstage or at band practice, distortion also tends to make things get muddy and hard to cut through the mix. I usually sit on a stool at band practice, so my amp is not pointed at my knees. Onstage I sometimes use the tilt back legs, again it depends on the location.

Main thing I think, cut back bass and mids and distortion a little and see how it works. I was surprised how much I could cut back distortion/saturation with full band and still get what I wanted. These days instead of distortion pedal 90% of the time I'm using the overdrive.



thanks for response dude ! Well I tried out quite a lot. I think I should reduce the bas slightly more, well at home I love to play with lots of bass ( 4-6 ) just sounds so full and heavy haha, but you´re right one should not mess with the bass player haha. Well I don´t play with that much distortion. I´ve got a overdrive kinda sound, I like it warm but heavy and with lots of sustain, to do some tapping, sweeping and shred kinda thing hahah. Anyway the more and the longer I play, I know how complexe that whole amp kinda thing is :/


Have you ever played open air ? the next concert we play open air, and so I think that makes it again different right ?
Oh yeah, and I´ve got to cabs so I think I could get more power also, when I´m playing with two cabs
#7
I've played lots of outdoor gigs, played one about a month ago, have a July 4th coming up. Hard to get a good sound, no walls behind you to bounce the sound around so it's easy for it to feel empty. Not much different as far as amp settings, just getting the whole band blended well. Harder to hear each other. I tend to aim my amp toward the inside a little. Bass player too. You'll probably be louder too. I'm still debating on whether I want to bring the Peavey MX for more power or stick with the Super Reverb...sometimes having that 130 watts of Peavey power helps when doing outdoor gigs. Just depends on how loud the overall tendency is. Last time the band before us was pretty tame so the Super Reverb did well.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#8
Quote by Paleo Pete
I've played lots of outdoor gigs, played one about a month ago, have a July 4th coming up. Hard to get a good sound, no walls behind you to bounce the sound around so it's easy for it to feel empty. Not much different as far as amp settings, just getting the whole band blended well. Harder to hear each other. I tend to aim my amp toward the inside a little. Bass player too. You'll probably be louder too. I'm still debating on whether I want to bring the Peavey MX for more power or stick with the Super Reverb...sometimes having that 130 watts of Peavey power helps when doing outdoor gigs. Just depends on how loud the overall tendency is. Last time the band before us was pretty tame so the Super Reverb did well.



Ok thanks, so you would aim the AMP toward the inside ? It´s not a huge gig, just about 100 peoples or something like that. Would you use monitores to better hear yourself playing ? or would you just play straight with your amp ? Sometimes monitores can be a disadvantage, since you don´t know how loud it´s in front of the audience