#1
Hey guys, I have a question. Why does my guitar sound better when I put my headphones on? My headphone isn't connected to the guitar. It is connected to the computer so I believe my headphone wasn't involved with anything that comes out of the amplifier.


When I compared headphone and no headphone on, I feel wearing the headphone gives a better tone. Could it be something to do with noise cancellation??


I'm not sure if you guys get what I'm asking, but I would appreciate every form of help I can get.

Thanks UG !!
#2
Did you ever think that maybe your headphones have better sound quality compared to your PC speakers?
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#3
The headphones are probably cancelling out some of the extreme high frequencies that can bounce around the room and sound harsh. You can try facing your amp a different direction or put a blanket or something over it and see if you get the same results.
#5
Quote by ToddMGuitar
The headphones are probably cancelling out some of the extreme high frequencies that can bounce around the room and sound harsh. You can try facing your amp a different direction or put a blanket or something over it and see if you get the same results.


Just the opposite.

Headphones usually have a wider frequency response than computer speakers, including higher highs and MUCH deeper bass. Listen to music on your computer speakers for a while, then put the headphones on. You'll hear the difference there as well.

If you're comparing to a relatively inexpensive guitar amp, you need to understand that there are two sections to that guitar amp. There's the preamp section, which produces the signal that goes into your computer, etc., and then there's the power amp and speaker. Generally, it's the power amp and speaker on a cheap amp that aren't up to the task. If you were to run the output directly from the preamp into a PA system, you'd sound completely different. Same goes if you run the output of the preamp into a powered speaker with wide range and relatively flat (as in "uncolored") response. Your preamp section is putting out good sound; the power amp and speaker section just isn't capable of keeping up.

And one more thing. If you're listening to the preamp section (or the preamp section through the computer), you can crank the sound up as much as you like without driving out babies and neighbors, etc., and your hearing response changes with the increase in perceived volume.
#6
Quote by dspellman
Just the opposite.

Headphones usually have a wider frequency response than computer speakers, including higher highs and MUCH deeper bass. Listen to music on your computer speakers for a while, then put the headphones on. You'll hear the difference there as well.

If you're comparing to a relatively inexpensive guitar amp, you need to understand that there are two sections to that guitar amp. There's the preamp section, which produces the signal that goes into your computer, etc., and then there's the power amp and speaker. Generally, it's the power amp and speaker on a cheap amp that aren't up to the task. If you were to run the output directly from the preamp into a PA system, you'd sound completely different. Same goes if you run the output of the preamp into a powered speaker with wide range and relatively flat (as in "uncolored") response. Your preamp section is putting out good sound; the power amp and speaker section just isn't capable of keeping up.

And one more thing. If you're listening to the preamp section (or the preamp section through the computer), you can crank the sound up as much as you like without driving out babies and neighbors, etc., and your hearing response changes with the increase in perceived volume.



I don't think he's actually listening to the guitar through the headphones, more like putting headphones on while playing on an amp if I understood correctly. In which case I agree with ToddMGuitar
#7
You may also notice that if you run a loud fan or washer machine or some other noise maker in the same room as your amp, it has a similar effect and makes your tone sound way better. At least for me it does. Seems to cancel out certain frequencies that are displeasing
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#8
Is your amp on the floor by chance? Try putting your amp on a stand, table, chair (something stable so use some common sense here) and see if your tone doesn't improve as well.

Amp on the floor + standing a few feet in front of it = you're getting the worst tone your amp has.

The headphones may indeed be blocking some of these frequencies and letting you hear the rest of them better.
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#9
Quote by nico_9550
I don't think he's actually listening to the guitar through the headphones, more like putting headphones on while playing on an amp if I understood correctly. In which case I agree with ToddMGuitar

Yes, I'm not listening through my headphone. The headphone is connected to my computer, not my amplifier.
#10
Quote by metalmingee
Is your amp on the floor by chance? Try putting your amp on a stand, table, chair (something stable so use some common sense here) and see if your tone doesn't improve as well.

Amp on the floor + standing a few feet in front of it = you're getting the worst tone your amp has.

The headphones may indeed be blocking some of these frequencies and letting you hear the rest of them better.

How do i alter the frequency? Is there any ways? And what amp setting do you guys recommend ? I'm playing an ibanez Gio through a NUX amp. How does putting the amp on the floor affect my sound output?
#11
Quote by ThEgAmE93
How do i alter the frequency? Is there any ways? And what amp setting do you guys recommend ? I'm playing an ibanez Gio through a NUX amp. How does putting the amp on the floor affect my sound output?


You get some measure of bass coupling and your ankles can hear everything you play.

Since you (probably) don't have ears in your ankles, you probably don't want to do that.

I suspect the best way to get better tone is to get a better amp.
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#13
Quote by ThEgAmE93
Yes, I'm not listening through my headphone. The headphone is connected to my computer, not my amplifier.


Wait a minute. So, it's there ANY sound coming thru the headphones? Are you saying that you're playing out loud, through your amp, and then just putting your headphones on, with no sound coming through them, just using them to muffle the sound coming to your ears from the outside?

If that's the case, then yeah, you've just got bad eq on your amp. Or it's just plain too loud. Our it's a crappy amp, with an overly shrill tone. Point is, it's a matter of your amp tone being bad, in whatever way. Not of your headphones being special or anything like that.
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#14
Quote by ThEgAmE93
Yes, I'm not listening through my headphone. The headphone is connected to my computer, not my amplifier.


So you're saying that you're just muffling the sound by stuffing something in your ears and you like that better?
#15
Yes, I'm just using the headphones to muffle out the sound. Its not playing anything.


Any recommendation for an amp or setting for metal? I have gain,mid,high and bass on my amp. What should i tune for them?
#16
Quote by ThEgAmE93
Yes, I'm just using the headphones to muffle out the sound. Its not playing anything.

Any recommendation for an amp or setting for metal? I have gain,mid,high and bass on my amp. What should i tune for them?


The setting for metal, you have to tweak the amp for yourself. There are no settings that are universal for every amp.

But head over to this thread, look for your favorite artists and work from there: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=294480

Some settings have scooped mids, but I wouldn't do that if I were you.
#18
Quote by Watterboy
You may also notice that if you run a loud fan or washer machine or some other noise maker in the same room as your amp, it has a similar effect and makes your tone sound way better. At least for me it does. Seems to cancel out certain frequencies that are displeasing

+1 This is why my laundry is next to my room. Playing guitar and not recording? Time to wash clothes.

OP, you may want to upgrade your amp (I think you said you have a NUX).
The above post is in terms of 'YMMV' and 'IMO', etc...

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The guitar world is drowned in fairy dust.
We need to start at the very beginning. What is tone.
#19
Im playing an Ibanez Gio on a NUX amplifier. Any brand that i should go for? I've heard of pearvy vyper. Is it good? Any other brand I should take note of?


My room has a ceiling fan and another that is in front of my amplifier. I can switch the floor one off or shift it away, i can't reallyndo shit about the ceiling fan though. Switching it off would feel like an oven in my poorly ventilated room
#20
Yeah, the Peavey Vyper is a far better amp. The Vyper Tube 60 is the one to get.
The headphones are cutting out the high end fizziness of a crappy amp.
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#21
So if i wish to tune down the treble, i'd adjust the HIGh? then what does the MID does?
#22
Quote by ThEgAmE93
So if i wish to tune down the treble, i'd adjust the HIGh? then what does the MID does?


The best way I can describe it is that mids are the "brightness" of the tone. Have the mids low your tone will sound dull, having the mids higher will brighten the tone by adding more mid range frequencies.

Lows (bass) controls the amount of low frequencies and highs (treble) controls the amount of high frequencies.

I'd also recommend a vypvr if you are looking for a good bedroom amp. I bought a vypvr-1 years ago and it was well worth the money since it sounds decent and has a lot of built in features.
Last edited by MeTallIcA313 at Jun 7, 2015,
#23
Quote by MeTallIcA313
The best way I can describe it is that mids are the "brightness" of the tone. Have the mids low your tone will sound dull, having the mids higher will brighten the tone by adding more mid range frequencies.

Lows (bass) controls the amount of low frequencies and highs (treble) controls the amount of high frequencies.

I'd also recommend a vypvr if you are looking for a good bedroom amp. I bought a vypvr-1 years ago and it was well worth the money since it sounds decent and has a lot of built in features.


Any specific model for the amp?
By the way, what's the diff between built in distortion and pedal distortion? Sound wise are they similar?
#24
Quote by ThEgAmE93
Any specific model for the amp?
By the way, what's the diff between built in distortion and pedal distortion? Sound wise are they similar?

This is the one I have. The more expensive models have more power and a bit more features.
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/VypyrVIP1

The amp has different distortion models built in, most sound decent. Actual distortion pedals do sound better tone wise but if you're newer at guitar I wouldn't worry about buying one at the moment, unless you're planning on using a looper pedal.
#25
Tube amp distortion is usually best, solid state distortion usually comes in the form of modeling chip nowadays. So pedals usually are better than the amp models, but again depends on the price and quality of distortion pedal, there are some real fugly noise boxes out there. BTW, pedal distortion and modeling amp is usually a recipe for bad sound.
Last edited by diabolical at Jun 9, 2015,
#26
Quote by diabolical
Tube amp distortion is usually best, solid state distortion usually comes in the form of modeling chip nowadays. So pedals usually are better than the amp models, but again depends on the price and quality of distortion pedal, there are some real fugly noise boxes out there. BTW, pedal distortion and modeling amp is usually a recipe for bad sound.

Not necessarily, at least not for the vypvr. I use a distortion pedal for mine and it doesn't sound bad as long as its EQ'd right and played overtop of a clean channel. The sound is more compressed than a normal higher wattage amp, but it's just a practice amp after all.
#27
Guys, I need help again. My amplifier is giving me alot of feedback. I cant seem to play with distortion without having the feedback buzzing at me like a bee. However, the problem is gone when i switch to clean. Is there anything I can do about it?
#28
^ if you actually mean feedback and know what that is, then you'd need a noisegate pedal but I'd upgrade the amp first. Otherwise that's what 'distortion' is.
The above post is in terms of 'YMMV' and 'IMO', etc...

Quote by Offworld92
This debate is exhausting to read.
The guitar world is drowned in fairy dust.
We need to start at the very beginning. What is tone.
#30
The feedback is there regardless of the headphones or not. Its irritating me. How do i solve it?
#31
Quote by ThEgAmE93
The feedback is there regardless of the headphones or not. Its irritating me. How do i solve it?


As 2Crosser said, you either need a new amp or a noise gate pedal.