#1
My high E is flat sounding when playing on the high notes. I adjusted the saddle by moving it closest possible towards the nut. It's still too flat sounding. If the nut moved any further, it would cut into the body when pushing down on the tremelo. Any solid advice from someone who can help?
Quote by Ignite

Once I got out of a pool and it was like 1cm.

Quote by Meths
I think there are few people with a less important opinion on women than you.
#2
bump
Quote by Ignite

Once I got out of a pool and it was like 1cm.

Quote by Meths
I think there are few people with a less important opinion on women than you.
#3
What kind of guitar do you have? And is it a true Floyd or a licensed one?
Also, what gauge strings are you using?
#4
Are the strings old?
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#5
Adjust the saddle of the high e string as far as possible before it starts touching the wood.
After that you have to adjust the saddles of all the other strings one by one (starting from high e towards low e) untill the intonation is clean.
The process can take several hours because you have to tune the guitar each time you change the intonation of two strings in relation to one another.
At least i did it this way and it worked.

My advice would be to grap a sixpack and watch simpsons along the process.
#7
I will change the strings however I had never had the problem before. It's a true floyd rose. It's a jackson neck thru emgs all that jazz. The strings have been on there at least a few months though. I didn't know it could cause the intonation to be whack. I don't want to change the saddles on the other strings because the intonation is great on those.
Quote by Ignite

Once I got out of a pool and it was like 1cm.

Quote by Meths
I think there are few people with a less important opinion on women than you.
#8
Quote by meta1militia
I will change the strings however I had never had the problem before. It's a true floyd rose. It's a jackson neck thru emgs all that jazz. The strings have been on there at least a few months though. I didn't know it could cause the intonation to be whack. I don't want to change the saddles on the other strings because the intonation is great on those.


Yeah, it's very difficult, if not impossible, to intonate a guitar with old strings. It's just not worth it, always intonate with new strings. I never have the same strings on for more than 2 months, I usually change them every 1 and a half month.

If you're changing string brand or gauge, you may have to reset the intonation of all strings though. But it should be minor adjustments.
#9
It's IMPOSSIBLE to intonate old strings. If they lose intonation, change them.
Gear:
Jackson Dinky (JB+59) > TC Polytune Noir > TS808 clone > DOD 250 > Modded RAT > CH-1 > GE-7 > TC Flashback > Plexi Clone
#11
Yeah, changing strings should be step one when you have intonation problems on a guitar that didn't have problems before. Otherwise, you're moving your saddles around in a vain attempt to compensate for dead strings, and just screwing it up, so it's still off when you put new strings on.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6