#1
Looking for some ideas on a good Jazz/Blues Guitar. I have a fairly low budget say around $600 plus or minus and a mint used guitar would be fine too. I am thinking along the lines of either a Fender Jazzmaster or one of the Epiphone Semi-Hollow bodies, like maybe the Joe Pass Emperor 2 or a Sheriton 2/ES335. Amp suggestions too, around $200. I live in a small apartment so anything over 20watts would be overkill. I saw a small 5watt Vox tube amp the other day that looked pretty good for around that price. Best thing was it had a control so you could turn it down to only 1 watt if you wanted to.
#2
Gretsch G5810
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#3
Epiphone Lucille perhaps?
Well, you can call me crazy
You can call me wrong, 'cause
See I was born a liar, albatross
Fly on, fly on
#4
I don't think the small Vox amps are what you want for jazz and blues. They're fine amps but they are much more geared towards fast breakup and brighter, jangly tone not usually used for jazzy sounds. A Mustang or a Pro Junior or even a decent non-modeling SS amp like the Acoustic brand or Peavey with a 1x12 speaker have pretty nice cleans. Distortion might not be great on those, so it's going to depend on if you're playing strictly clean jazz and blues. If you want some grit a Mustang or a Champ type of amp would be good.

The Gretsch is also not a great fit, it's a nice guitar but again it's bright, jangly, and just not suited for what most people would want when they think of jazz or bluesy type sounds. You probably want a darker sound based on what you're considering. Ibanez has a bunch of Artcore models, any of which would be fantastic. Epiphone has a lot of options too but I find those are more hit and miss with quality. I'd actually suggest spending a bit less on the guitar and a bit more on the amp in this price range. A Squier Jazzmaster and a nice low-wattage Fender tube amp would be a my choice, I think.
#5
Unless you're going to be playing with other musicians, I'd skip the amp for now, and get a portable digital modeler- Line6 POD, Tascam GT-R1, Korg Pandora, Boss Micro BR, etc.- and some decent headphones. No worries about disturbing the peace. Features including tuners, metronomes, preprogrammed drum sequences, and the modeling amps & pedals are available. Some offer recording and/or computer interfacing. Prices range from $99-300. Fits in a case or gigbag.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jun 6, 2015,
#7
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#8
i'd take a look the Ibanez Artcore line as they have some nice affordable guitars for just what you want. Agree with Roc on the amp if you can't aford more then a Fender Mustang may be the ticket for what you want to play.
#9
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Unless you're going to be playing with other musicians, I'd skip the amp for now, and get a portable digital modeler- Line6 POD, Tascam GT-R1, Korg Pandora, Boss Micro BR, etc.- and some decent headphones. No worries about disturbing the peace. Features including tuners, metronomes, preprogrammed drum sequences, and the modeling amps & pedals are available. Some offer recording and/or computer interfacing. Prices range from $99-300. Fits in a case or gigbag.


Thanks I have never heard of those. I'll need to go poke around on Sam Ash and see if I can find what you are talking about..
#10
Quote by Roc8995
The Gretsch is also not a great fit, it's a nice guitar but again it's bright, jangly, and just not suited for what most people would want when they think of jazz or bluesy type sounds.


So... a Bo Diddley signature Gretsch is not a good guitar for playing the blues? Good grief.

Blues and Jazz is a pretty broad spectrum.

Perhaps OP should give us an idea of what artists tones are preferred.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#11
You're right, blues and jazz is a broad spectrum, but I covered that in my post, while you simply posted a model number with no further explanation. If you're going to complain about criticism, defend your input better.

For a very specific type of blues it is a good guitar. However, given the other guitars that OP said they were considering, I don't think that was the goal. It seemed like they were leaning towards a fairly standard semi- or hollow-body guitar with a dark/mellow voice, and the Gretsch you suggested (again, with no further explanation) just doesn't fit in there.

Again, it's not a terrible suggestion but you haven't exactly explained why you think it's a good choice. I was merely explaining why it might not be.
#12
Quote by ThunderPunk
So... a Bo Diddley signature Gretsch is not a good guitar for playing the blues? Good grief.




And jazz?

BTW, putting Bo Diddley's signature on something doesn't mean it's a "good guitar for playing the blues." He's not approving this stuff these days, and what it IS for sure, is a "guitar designed to make Gretsch money."
#13
Quote by dspellman
And jazz?

BTW, putting Bo Diddley's signature on something doesn't mean it's a "good guitar for playing the blues." He's not approving this stuff these days, and what it IS for sure, is a "guitar designed to make Gretsch money."


It's shaped like a box, though!

And having his name on the guitar doesn't mean that it isn't good for playing the blues. One shouldn't generalize either way to be honest.

The point is that the OP could literally go with just about any kind of guitar and cover a lot of territory. Everything from a Semi-Hollow ES or Artcore, to a Les Paul, or a Stratocaster. Technique goes a long way in these genres. Amp probably plays a bigger factor than anything. I've enjoyed many nights of listening to blues and jazz musicians in hole in the wall joints in various places around the country, including sweet home Chicago. I've never seen what could be defined as a "standard" blues or jazz guitar.

Of course, OP should avoid some extremes like a Dimebucker loaded Dean Razorback. And even then, I've heard some guys rip some great blues stuff out on such instruments. The OP needs to buy what appeals to him, what feels best in his hands, is comfortable, what will help him play his best. Guitars for the most part are pretty darn flexible.

I had both a beautiful Yamaha AEX 500 and a Yamaha AEX 1500 back in the late 90's that I loved for both blues and jazz. Neck heavy though. They're harder to find these days.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#14
I wonder about spending only $200 on an amp and $600 on a guitar. One of the reasons I took about 30 years to come to terms with electric guitars was because of my failure to appreciate to importance of the amp and pickups - in the days before the information superhighway. I can't offer any specific suggestion on inexpensive amps, because I'm out of touch - mine is a modded series 1 Epi VJ that I have had for many years. I don't want to start another argument about upgrading inexpensive guitars (my favourite cost Oz$65, my amp technician mate's $20), so I'll suggest going with a small digital modeller, as already suggested or a Roland Cube that has the Jazz Chorus emulation.

For the guitar, I would be looking at something with two humbuckers with the right look for jazz and blues. Here's one one I could be happy with:

http://www.squierguitars.com/guitars/telecaster/squier-j5-tele-rosewood-fingerboard-frost-gold/

In black.
#15
Quote by ThunderPunk
It's shaped like a box, though!

And having his name on the guitar doesn't mean that it isn't good for playing the blues. One shouldn't generalize either way to be honest.

The point is that the OP could literally go with just about any kind of guitar and cover a lot of territory. Everything from a Semi-Hollow ES or Artcore, to a Les Paul, or a Stratocaster. Technique goes a long way in these genres. Amp probably plays a bigger factor than anything. I've enjoyed many nights of listening to blues and jazz musicians in hole in the wall joints in various places around the country, including sweet home Chicago. I've never seen what could be defined as a "standard" blues or jazz guitar.

Of course, OP should avoid some extremes like a Dimebucker loaded Dean Razorback. And even then, I've heard some guys rip some great blues stuff out on such instruments. The OP needs to buy what appeals to him, what feels best in his hands, is comfortable, what will help him play his best. Guitars for the most part are pretty darn flexible.

I had both a beautiful Yamaha AEX 500 and a Yamaha AEX 1500 back in the late 90's that I loved for both blues and jazz. Neck heavy though. They're harder to find these days.


while you are not wrong it seems like a better plan to recommend guitars that are geared more towards the types of music he plays. sure i play blues on a BC Rich Eagle and that works fine for me but it wouldn't be even close to the first guitar i'd recommend to others. there are certainly guitars geared toward traditional jazz and could be considered "standard". blues also has some traditional guitars associated with it. granted both are very broad genres at this point but unles a Poster clearly defines what he wants we just have to give it the best shot and that usually means gear that is generally associated with what they want.