#1
So, I'm buying an electro acoustic guitar soon and I'm wondering which strings would be the best for fingerstyle? I've heard that Elixir are really good but I don't know if I should get the light ones (0.012 - 0.053) or the light medium ones (0.012 - 0.056)?

As for the guitar, I'm planning to buy a Fender CD60CE. Do you think it would be good for fingerstyle?
Last edited by blackomen52 at Jun 6, 2015,
#2
i'm not partial to elixer, but not every guitar sounds great with every kind of strings, and everyone has their own personal taste.

i don't think the CD60CE would be good for fingerstyle. the nut is too narrow to be good for fingerstyle plus you're paying more for the electronics and cutaway, and since this is a lower priced guitar, that means that they have to save money on the guitar itself so the guitar is all laminate. i'm not aware of a new guitar around the price of the CD60CE with electronics that has a wider nut.

what's your budget and would you consider going used?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#3
Quote by patticake
i'm not partial to elixer, but not every guitar sounds great with every kind of strings, and everyone has their own personal taste.

i don't think the CD60CE would be good for fingerstyle. the nut is too narrow to be good for fingerstyle plus you're paying more for the electronics and cutaway, and since this is a lower priced guitar, that means that they have to save money on the guitar itself so the guitar is all laminate. i'm not aware of a new guitar around the price of the CD60CE with electronics that has a wider nut.

what's your budget and would you consider going used?


I plan on plugging the guitar into pc via my audio interface and I would use Guitar Rig for the sound. The max I would go for is $340, maybe a bit more. I wouldn't really like to get a used guitar.

Could you check here which one would be good for fingerstyle: http://www.franc-music-shop.com/index.php?orderby=product_price&DescOrderBy=ASC&Itemid=53&option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse&category_id=158&manufacturer_id=0&keyword=&keyword1=&keyword2=
The price is in croatian kunas.
#5
The Fender is very easy to play but have a good look around for other guitars anyway. Also try as many types of strings as you can, everyone has different preferences. Saying that, don't go lighter than .12s, your guitar will probably sound very thin and weak.
#6
i didn't see yamaha, seagull, RK or blueridge on the site he linked to. in the op's budget, it's pretty much cort, epiphone, fender and dean. i didn't see anything with a wider nut, although i could have missed something.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#7
Quote by blackomen52
So, I'm buying an electro acoustic guitar soon and I'm wondering which strings would be the best for fingerstyle? I've heard that Elixir are really good but I don't know if I should get the light ones (0.012 - 0.053) or the light medium ones (0.012 - 0.056)?

As for the guitar, I'm planning to buy a Fender CD60CE. Do you think it would be good for fingerstyle?
I think if you're dead set on buying a Fender, you should hold out for the CD-100 (?), or CD-140. Those, (and I think a CD-100 exists), would both be solid tops. The CD-60 is all laminate.

If I could interest you in a Yamaha FGX-700 SC, that would be a better option, at about $300.00, no tax, free shipping online.


As Patti points out, a 1 11/16" nut width is approaching standard, and certainly prevalent in the price range we're discussing. These are narrow for pure finger style playing, and 1 3/4. or even 1 7/8" would be preferred. Classical (nylon string guitars), often have 2" nut widths!

So, take your time and look around. At the very least, try learning on a couple of 1 11/16" width guitars, just to see if the smaller nut is feasible for you.
#8
Whatever one you like, simple. Elixer are great, but not everyone likes them, and I too have fallen out of favour with them, you just have to try different brands.
#9
Quote by Captaincranky
I think if you're dead set on buying a Fender, you should hold out for the CD-100 (?), or CD-140. Those, (and I think a CD-100 exists), would both be solid tops. The CD-60 is all laminate.

If I could interest you in a Yamaha FGX-700 SC, that would be a better option, at about $300.00, no tax, free shipping online.


As Patti points out, a 1 11/16" nut width is approaching standard, and certainly prevalent in the price range we're discussing. These are narrow for pure finger style playing, and 1 3/4. or even 1 7/8" would be preferred. Classical (nylon string guitars), often have 2" nut widths!

So, take your time and look around. At the very least, try learning on a couple of 1 11/16" width guitars, just to see if the smaller nut is feasible for you.


Yeah, a lot of people are telling me that I should get a 1 3/4''. I wouldn't go bigger than that because I have small hands. I raised my budget to approximately $470 because I'd really like a 1 3/4''
#10
Guitar strings



Quote by blackomen52
Yeah, a lot of people are telling me that I should get a 1 3/4''. I wouldn't go bigger than that because I have small hands. I raised my budget to approximately $470 because I'd really like a 1 3/4''


I wouldn't worry about the size of your hands. Unless you're a small child, you will probably not be hampered significantly by your hand size. I too have "small hands." Classical guitars have never been a problem for me.

On the topic of strings, pretty much everything has been covered. Outside of what gauge/range your guitar has been designed for, everything else is preference. A lot of fingerstyle players prefer light strings, but I don't always. The top 3 strings often feel weak to me when playing on lights.

For brands, I generally prefer Cleartone EMP.
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#11
Quote by blackomen52
So, I'm buying an electro acoustic guitar soon and I'm wondering which strings would be the best for fingerstyle? I've heard that Elixir are really good but I don't know if I should get the light ones (0.012 - 0.053) or the light medium ones (0.012 - 0.056)?

As for the guitar, I'm planning to buy a Fender CD60CE. Do you think it would be good for fingerstyle?


Fender generally makes terrible acoustics - get a Yamaha.

As for strings, do you plan on using open tunings or playing a lot in lower tunings ( i.e. a la Don Ross or Andy McKee) - if so, then get bigger strings, otherwise they'll be flapping all over the place and never stay in tune.
#12
That "wider nut" thing is strictly a matter of preference. Although many fingerstyle players use them, as many don't. You will find all manner of fingerstyle jazz players who get along just fine on all manner of electric guitars with necks that compare to standard acoustic widths.
Likewise many well-known fingerstyle players (like Mark Knopfler) who play fingerstyle on skinny-neck solidbodies.
Try a number of instruments and see what you like.

Me, I play fingerstyle jazz on an Ibanez semi-hollow and a 3/4 sized classical. (much narrower neck than a standard classical guitar.
#13
I think I'll go with a Baton Rouge AR21C/GACE, a little over my budget but I love the sound of it
#14
Quote by Bikewer
That "wider nut" thing is strictly a matter of preference. Although many fingerstyle players use them, as many don't. You will find all manner of fingerstyle jazz players who get along just fine on all manner of electric guitars with necks that compare to standard acoustic widths.
Likewise many well-known fingerstyle players (like Mark Knopfler) who play fingerstyle on skinny-neck solidbodies.
Try a number of instruments and see what you like . . . .


Yes, this is right ^ ^ ^ ^

I fingerpick just about exclusively on all my guitars with necks ranging from 40mm (electric), through 42mm, 45mm, 48mm (acoustic) to 52m (classical).

There is no such thing as a "fingerstyle" guitar - how you play a guitar is up to you. And, of course, so is the choice of strings. Like Bikewer says, experiment.
Last edited by Garthman at Jun 11, 2015,
#15
Umm, wouldn't like to get a used guitar?? What is wrong with a used guitar, you are much better off buying a used guitar of a higher quality than a cheap heap from fender like that, built to trap people who dont know much about acoustic guitars. Ask local guitarists what you should do, never trust pawn shop guys, but many times, that is where you will find you're best deal, the best of luck and may you're journey fare thee well!
#16
D'addario and Elixir are both great brands (I use the first.), and with fingerstyle, it's always best to get the lightest you can find, in order to bend easier and whatnot. Rythym guitar and Hybrid picking or whatever uses heavier strings better (At least in my experience).
#Acoustic Life
#17
The type of strings will not make much difference in your fingerpicking, each guitar will only sound so good, that what makes the better guitars better. What will make a difference is the time you put into practice fingerpicking.
#18
The strings that are the best changes from guitar to guitar.  I typically use Elixir strings because they sound the best on most of my guitars but I have a few guitars that sound terrible with Elixir.  I also use D'addario on a lot of my guitars.  A few of my guitars seem to sound best with newtone strings.  You are going to need to try a few brands and see what you like on your guitar.  I recommend staying away from gibson and fender strings because they break very quickly.  There was a time when the only thing I had easy access to was gibson strings and 1 in 3 packs would have at least 1 string break during the 1st tuning and fender strings were not much better. 

When choosing string gauge you have to consider tone, playability, and what the guitar is structurally designed for.  Heavier strings have better low end definition, more volume, and fatter tone.  Lighter strings have more top end clarity but less volume, thinner overall tone, and mushier bass.  If your strings are too heavy they can damage your guitar and if they are too light they won't drive your guitar hard enough causing you to sound thin or sterile.  It's best to start with whatever your guitar manufacturer recommends and then move up or down depending on comfort and how hard you want to drive the guitar top.

All of that advice is based on the idea that you are using standard tuning.  If you are using alternate tunings that require you to tune the guitar down you need heavier strings to stop buzz and prevent mushiness in the low end.  If you are using alternate tunings that require you to tune up then you need to using lighter strings to avoid damage to the guitar, string breakage, and to keep the guitar comfortable to play.


As for what guitar you choose  I'm not going to recommend a brand or model but would recommend trying to find something with a solid top.  Don't look for an electric acoustic.  I'm not saying don't get an electric acoustic I'm just saying look for a good acoustic and if that acoustic happens to have a pickup then that is a bonus.  Generally it's cheaper to get a good acoustic and a good pickup separately than it is to buy a good acoustic that has good factory electronics.  You might get lucky but with your budget I wouldn't count on it.

On the topic of nut width I'd say it is purely subjective.  Get what feels good in your hands.  I like a wide nut on all my guitar no matter what playing style I use.  My wife likes a narrow nut which means I don't have to share my guitars with her.  There is no right answer.
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#19
Quote by deneillutter
The type of strings will not make much difference in your fingerpicking, each guitar will only sound so good, that what makes the better guitars better. What will make a difference is the time you put into practice fingerpicking.

Well, it actually makes difference at all.  For me heavier string makes the sounds better.  Lighter usually makes the sounds too thin. 
#20
Quote by Frank_Music
Well, it actually makes difference at all.  For me heavier string makes the sounds better.  Lighter usually makes the sounds too thin. 

As I said, the quality of your guitar makes the difference. Strings can change sound. I change the type of strings to change loudness. I have used silk core strings on one of my guitars, the loudness never changed but a softer sound. Pratice will also help