#1
Here's what I would use..

http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__18786__9V_4_5A_UBEC_2_5S_Lipoly_6_23v_.html


A switching regulator that takes any rc lipo from 2 to 5s.


This is for those of you who already have RC gear set.

Using this ubec device, you can connect any of your rc lipos with the right connector, straight into the dc jack of all your pedals.

This ubec supplies up to 4.5a so it's way more than enough for even the most demanding pedalboards.

My only concern would be the lipo not being utilized enough as a simple 3s 2200mah lipo packs a huge punch of capacity for pedals who don't require that much discharge rate.

The battery is best to be of really low discharge types or just find someone with a really old/used lipo that is no longer usable for rc.

You can get away with a new lipo but it's a waste of money to get them new.
#2
If I need to run all of my pedal from one battery I’d just plug the AC adapter into a large rechargeable battery that has an AC plug on it. Black and Decker’s power station products would work—and jump the car if you leave the lights on during a gig! There are similar products that connect to a photovoltaic solar cell for charging.
#3
"Do you like the inconvenience and expense of replacing batteries, but miss the obnoxious clock noise of a cheap digitally regulated power supply? Have we got a product for you!"

I joke, but really I can't think of a lot of situations where I'd want to run a pedalboard off of a single battery. It's probably useful for some folks but I think most people are served pretty well by a box of cheap 9Vs or a $20 pedal power and a daisy chain.
#4
Didn't you just have another thread locked earlier today for having no discussion value, and being a thinly veiled spam ad for some kind of battery thing?
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#6
Quote by Roc8995
I joke, but really I can't think of a lot of situations where I'd want to run a pedalboard off of a single battery.


If you’re busking with digital delays and reverbs it might make sense, especially if the battery if also powering your amp.
#7
Quote by jpnyc
If you’re busking with digital delays and reverbs it might make sense, especially if the battery if also powering your amp.


If you believe there's a 9v battery in existence that can sustain that setup after switch mode regulation I've got some prime real estate in florida you might be interested in.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#8
Batteries are a terrible idea to power delays and reverbs unless you've got some very non-power hungry one. I tried once, it lasted half an hour on a really good type battery that I've used to power distortion pedals for 2+ months.
#9
Quote by TheLiberation
Batteries are a terrible idea to power delays and reverbs unless you've got some very non-power hungry one. I tried once, it lasted half an hour on a really good type battery that I've used to power distortion pedals for 2+ months.


I was more worried your power delays and and reverbs couldn't even drain the RC lipos to a safety storage level at 3.8v per cell.

You have not been in the RC world, you have no idea the sort of batteries we have..

They're super high capacity and high discharge capable. I am more worried your teeny weenie pedals can't drain them enough!

That's why I suggested to get used batteries from RC hobbyists who can't use them anymore for their models.

Anyone else here with RC background of electronics engineering experience should know I am not kidding you.
#11
He's saying that if you get a battery that's completely ill-suited to this sort of application, you can use it, but he's concerned that the battery might be "too good" (read: completely ill-suited) to the application he just suggested.

Your pedals are going to sound like garbage at 3.8v per cell, if they work at all. Digital pedals are going to cut out well before that. So most of the power capacity of that big expensive battery would be wasted on a pedalboard.

Basically he's suggesting that we use a train engine in a car, because it's a bigger engine which is obviously better, but he's worried that a train engine might be too powerful for a car. In reality of course the primary issue is not the amount of power available but the form of that power and the method of delivery.
#12
Quote by Roc8995

I joke, but really I can't think of a lot of situations where I'd want to run a pedalboard off of a single battery. It's probably useful for some folks but I think most people are served pretty well by a box of cheap 9Vs or a $20 pedal power and a daisy chain.


A friend who was reading over my shoulder laughed and said, "That's like your anchor!"
That's what he calls my old (and large) UPS. I've taken to hauling that thing to gigs where we have a sketchy power source (bars with ice machines and neon on the same circuit, back-of-a-flatbed-with-a-diesel-generator, etc.). It's got what amounts to a small car battery inside, weighs a ton, and it seems to work by taking source current, using it to charge the backup battery *and* to smooth the current, run it up (or down) to a stable voltage and then out to the outlets. If the voltage drops too far, it will pull some power from the battery to boost it. VERY smooth output all the time. My amp and associated bits run through it, and there have been occasions where we've been playing away, lost all power (or enough to keep everyone else's gear online), and I'll be playing all by myself. Shortly after, the power will suddenly pop back on, there'll be a huge surge, and everyone will be watching their fuses go (except me...).

I guess that thing could power pedals for the next millenium...
#13
That's an example of a good use of a large capacity battery. Of course, that design is a lot more about smooth, reliable power than simply throwing "some" juice at your equipment.

Makes a big difference that you can run your amp off of it too, it wouldn't do much good for your pedalboard to keep on working if the amp's power died.