#2
Practice.

Seriously man, there's no other way around it. Check out Justin guitar beginner's course on youtube to get some guidance. Very good to set you on right path.
#3
Yeah, put the hours in and eventually it'll be easy. There's not really a secret to it beyond that.
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#4
Build the chord from the top down (Low E - high E), assuming your strumming in that direction. Your finger placement is a split second ahead of your strumming. So you're actually starting to play the chord before your finished placing all your fingers.

Thats a technique I used when I first started playing. But eventually muscle memory kicks in and you learn to just be quick.
#5
Practise the chord changes to a metronome.

From slow to the tempo you like. Get confortable then speed it up by 5 bpm then repeat.
#6
Okay, so after a monotonous 25 minutes of switching between A and D, my fingers are pretty sore but I think I'm almost there. Do you have to do this for every single chord combination? :/
#7
Quote by Serotonite
Okay, so after a monotonous 25 minutes of switching between A and D, my fingers are pretty sore but I think I'm almost there. Do you have to do this for every single chord combination? :/


May seem difficult and too much at first, but you'll get the hang of it in no time. Don't worry about sore fingers, you'll build calluses soon. Keep going

Try to practice that in a musical context. Grab a song that is chords only and practice. Should be more interesting and less monotonous.
#8
Quote by DanyFS
Try to practice that in a musical context. Grab a song that is chords only and practice. Should be more interesting and less monotonous.


I've tried three little birds, but unfortunately that's only really recognisable alongside the lyrics And trying to sing along, especially off-beat can distract you from the chord switching.
#9
Quote by Serotonite
I've tried three little birds, but unfortunately that's only really recognisable alongside the lyrics And trying to sing along, especially off-beat can distract you from the chord switching.


Singing and playing at the same time is something you have to practice too. I never bothered with it though, my voice is horrible and I can't sing
#10
Quote by Serotonite
Okay, so after a monotonous 25 minutes of switching between A and D, my fingers are pretty sore but I think I'm almost there. Do you have to do this for every single chord combination? :/



Nope! You can only change to a chord as fast as you can make the chord in the first place. Let's say you're having a hard time switching from D to C. How fast can you make a D or C in the first place? If you watch yourself make the chord and you see your fingers coming down one after the other, that's going to take too long and slow you down no matter what chord you're coming from.
Since you don't mind putting in monotonous work, a great exercise is to take any chord you're having trouble with (putting down one finger at a time, no matter how fast, is a sign you're having trouble with a chord) like let's say C, and then practice squeezing and relaxing your fingers. You squeeze just enough to make the notes ring, and when you relax you relax enough to make the notes die but still keep in contact with the string. Practice squeezing and releasing on one chord for a good few minutes. This is putting the sensation of all 3 fingers coming down in the chord's shape into your muscle memory. After that try instead of just relaxing the fingers, try keeping the shape of the chord and lifting off just enough so that your fingers aren't touching the strings but are still holding the shape of the chord. Now bring them down into the chord simultaneously! You might notice a few fingers going rogue and moving out of the shape. Focus on those on every repetition. Finally after you've practiced this on a few chords for a few weeks you'll find that you can switch to a chord with all of the fingers moving to the shape and the frets at once. Now you will never ever have a problem switching to that chord, no matter what chord you're coming from.
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#11
I been learning 5 months just working on chord and chord changes and iam geting better,
It takes years to become a good player just stick with it and partice chords and chord. And changes, it's called muscle memory, the more u partice your chords and changes it gets easy over time
Last edited by Tazz3 at Jun 7, 2015,
#12
I like Dalilama's idea. Never thought of learning that way but it makes sense. When we first learn it's one finger one note, next finger 2nd note etc. and that's how it should be but I appreciate that after you've done that for awhile it's a good idea to get use to the chords shape and putting all your fingers down at the same time. That's how you end up playing anyway so why not practice that way. Good practical advise.
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#13
I have officially mastered A - D! I can now do a switch per second, is that fast enough?
#14
Serotonite,go to Justin guitar and watch and lean his beginner course,
He is a good teacher he has this practice called one minute changes
Do as many chord changes from a to d in one mintue and try to beat it the next time
It takes time don't give up
When u do chord changes u can't stop strumming lol
#16
Quote by Serotonite
I have officially mastered A - D! I can now do a switch per second, is that fast enough?


That depends on what you are trying to play. There are songs where that would be fast enough and songs where it wouldn't even be close. You will just get faster over time the more you practice. It's not something you can rush really. The JustinGuitar "one minute changes" are the best way I've found to improve your chord changes though, just repeatedly switching between various chords.
#17
One of the best guitarists I know has his students pretending that there's a button on their leg, and every time they strum a chord once they have to hit the button, then fret the chord again. After doing this for a few hours, even complex chords with massive stretches are easy to play.
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#18
Quote by jameswryantx
One of the best guitarists I know has his students pretending that there's a button on their leg, and every time they strum a chord once they have to hit the button, then fret the chord again. After doing this for a few hours, even complex chords with massive stretches are easy to play.


Interesting idea, might give that a go, thanks
#19
Quote by ngocnb
For me, it's difficult when change from D to Bm

I cant go from A to Dm
#20
You can't go quickly from A to Dm or D to Bm today, but maybe tomorrow or the day after (depending on how much you practice) you will. The more you play the easier it is. If you are looking for "easy", guitar may not be the instrument you want to learn to play. (I don't mean that as anything discouraging or mean but good guitar playing is not easy.)
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jun 16, 2015,