#1
I've been rehearsing with my symphonic death metal band (Khrysaor) for a while now, and we are thinking that we might need in-ear monitoring to play live. My question is: As musicians who are not familiar with playing live with backing tracks, how long will it will take for us to prepare our total of 6 songs (about 5 mins each) for a live gig, if each one of us has in-ear monitors!

P.S: This how I plan to setup the live equipment if that helps
CLICK HERE FOR PIC
#2
If you are already familiar with the material, I don't see why it would take longer than 1 or 2 rehearsals to get the hang of it.

Are the in ear monitors the only thing going to be different from the before and after?

I'm not certain how playing with backing tracks will be different from a regular PA to in ear monitors. Your drummer is going to have to be good with the click but this has nothing to do with monitoring technic
#3
Quote by flexiblemile
If you are already familiar with the material, I don't see why it would take longer than 1 or 2 rehearsals to get the hang of it.

Are the in ear monitors the only thing going to be different from the before and after?

I'm not certain how playing with backing tracks will be different from a regular PA to in ear monitors. Your drummer is going to have to be good with the click but this has nothing to do with monitoring technic


In the rehearsals we did so far, only the drummer wore headphones with a click track, and the rest was coming out of the monitors, but the sound was pretty f*cked up and we could't synchronise properly. As I imagine, the situation will be even worse during the live. That's why we are buying the in-ears..
#4
Should be easier to hear everyone clearly with the in ears. I'd also say 1-2 rehearsals, but I obviously don't know you or your band so I can't say for sure. If you have everyone running through the in ears, as you probably should, don't expect the tone to be great. In my experience you can hear everything clearly if its well balanced, but due to the nature of the headphones or whatever everything sounds a little funny. That might vary with different brands.
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#5
Quote by guitarpro2play
In the rehearsals we did so far, only the drummer wore headphones with a click track, and the rest was coming out of the monitors, but the sound was pretty f*cked up and we could't synchronise properly. As I imagine, the situation will be even worse during the live. That's why we are buying the in-ears..


That's worrying. I play in a Symphonic Metal band that gigs regularly, and, honestly, we've never had this problem playing through the PA. If you're not synchronized, then either you're not following the drummer, or the drummer isn't following the click. In ear monitors won't fix this. If you aren't keeping in time with your drummer, then you need to listen to him and work on your own timing, if your drummer isn't keeping in time with the backing, he needs practice. Your drummer should be keeping a hi-hat going whenever the drums cut out in a song to keep the guitar riff etc in time. In ears will not fix your problem at all, as there's a fundamental flaw here. You need to pull it apart and see why it isn't together, get the drummer to play a whole track on his own, if it's perfect and everything is in sync, then the rest of the band need to follow him, if he goes out of time, then he needs to work on it. On our first gig, we had only one rehearsal, and everything was perfectly in time from the first run through of our set, so this shouldn't even be an issue.
#6
Backing tracks annoy me when gigging live but I guess that is the latest "thing" bands do. I usually play 1-2 times a month with IEMs and recorded backing tracks. It doesn't take very long to adapt to IEMs and you can even record a cue track alongside your backing tracks if needed to count a 9/8 bridge section or whatever. A useful tool I but one I would rather do without. Too karaoke for me I guess as I prefer my live music 100% live.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
I have been working with midi backing tracks for more than 20 years now and I agree with CelestialGuitar. The worry is not about the in-ear monitors it's about the experience of playing live period to backing tracks. We tried IEM's several years back but both my partner and I felt too isolated from the actual live sound and the audience. We are also a do-it-yourself band so we don't use a sound engineer out front to balance our sound and we have to rely on our own judgment to make sure everything is balanced and the overall volume is correct for the room. The IEM's felt isolating to me and just didn't work for us (also the expense of a really good IEM system was pretty steep). Fortunately, we were able to borrow a decent Galaxy system from another band for a few gigs (they were trying to sell it to us to buy a better system). Maybe we didn't give it enough time. All that being said, good luck. I hope it works out for your band.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.