#2
Are there any other markings?
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#3
Interesting but I can't identify it. I can't even figure out if those are symbols or letters.
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#4
Sorry, man. I checked through my luthier directory under "A" and "F" and could not find anything. But if you do discover the maker, drop them a line and tell them how utterly screwed their logo is!

Looks like a nice guitar, though.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#6
can we see a full pic of the back? does it have any other markings on it whatsoever? maybe a label inside the body cavity or stamp anywhere?

if korea, i'm guessing cort, if japan, i'd lean towards a matsumoku build.

but those are probably the most popular options for rebrands, if it's as old as i'm guessing.
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Last edited by gregs1020 at Jun 9, 2015,
#7
Quote by gregs1020
can we see a full pic of the back? does it have any other markings on it whatsoever? maybe a label inside the body cavity or stamp anywhere?

if korea, i'm guessing cort, if japan, i'd lean towards a matsumoku build.

but those are probably the most popular options for rebrands, if it's as old as i'm guessing.


I don’t think it’s that old. The hardware is too clean, the inlays are too complex, and I don’t think transparent gray finishes were a thing before PRS caught on. Based on the cheap tuning machine knobs I’d say this is a low-end Chinese guitar from the same factory that makes them for Turser, Oscar Schmidt, etc.
#8
Quote by jpnyc
I don’t think it’s that old. The hardware is too clean, the inlays are too complex, and I don’t think transparent gray finishes were a thing before PRS caught on. Based on the cheap tuning machine knobs I’d say this is a low-end Chinese guitar from the same factory that makes them for Turser, Oscar Schmidt, etc.


+1

The run of the mill, lack of any imagination truss rod cover also hints at made in China bulk. Koreans and more so Japanese have a bit more focus on details.
#10
Considering the neck is sprayed completely black I don't see how you come to the conclusion that the neck is one piece.
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#11
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Considering the neck is sprayed completely black I don't see how you come to the conclusion that the neck is one piece.


I think he meant that the neck and the body look they are the same piece of wood because there are no screw holes for the neck a la Fender... more of a glue-joint Gibson design like LP or ES models(?).

They can be removed, but the process is much more involved than removing four screws.
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#12
Quote by thief_of_fire
I think he meant that the neck and the body look they are the same piece of wood because there are no screw holes for the neck a la Fender... more of a glue-joint Gibson design like LP or ES models(?).

They can be removed, but the process is much more involved than removing four screws.


People call that a set neck design; when the neck is glued into the body. If the body and neck are one piece then its a neck through.


Saying solid piece makes me think of how many pieces the neck is made.
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I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#13
Quote by thief_of_fire
I think he meant that the neck and the body look they are the same piece of wood because there are no screw holes for the neck a la Fender... more of a glue-joint Gibson design like LP or ES models(?).

They can be removed, but the process is much more involved than removing four screws.


yup...there are no seams or joint...it "appears" to be solid...
#14
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
People call that a set neck design; when the neck is glued into the body. If the body and neck are one piece then its a neck through.


Saying solid piece makes me think of how many pieces the neck is made.


It's probably a set neck then. Can't you usually tell by the finish/tone of the wood if it's neck-through?

Assuming set neck is cheaper to manufacture than neck through.
~GEAR~

'93 Fender Duo Sonic Reissue

'84 ProCo Smallbox RAT->Fulltone OCD->Akai E2 Headrush->Acoustic Model 470/Acoustic 105 4x12
#15
Quote by thief_of_fire
It's probably a set neck then. Can't you usually tell by the finish/tone of the wood if it's neck-through?

Assuming set neck is cheaper to manufacture than neck through.


No you can't tell by the tone. I'm sure some will argue otherwise though.


Generally you could look at the heel of the guitar and see if there's a join somewhere. That might be hard to spot if the guitar has a contoured heel and it's a solid color.





If you look at that picture closely you can see the join at the heel. Now imagine that same heel painted black and you can see how it might be a bit hard to spot. There might be a tenon in the neck joint as well that you can look for to see if it's a set neck like this:




and then this would be neck through:




notice the neck and middle body portion are one piece.


There might be better ways to spot it but I generally check the heel and the neck cavities
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
Last edited by H4T3BR33D3R at Jun 9, 2015,
#16
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
No you can't tell by the tone. I'm sure some will argue otherwise though.


I could be wrong, but I think he's referring to the color-tone of the wood, not the sound-tone of the wood. A lot of neck-throughs--like the one you posted--have natural finishes and a differentiation in color, between the body and neck, is obvious. I'm thinking that this is what he meant.

To the OP, I have no information on the manufacturer, but I'm interested to see if anyone is able to identify it.
Last edited by Fuzz Aldrin at Jun 17, 2015,
#17
clearly not a vintage guitar. it looks like a knock off of the Squier Esprit from a few years back. may be a brand meant for asian consumption rather than international.
#18
Quote by jpnyc
I don’t think it’s that old. The hardware is too clean, the inlays are too complex, and I don’t think transparent gray finishes were a thing before PRS caught on. Based on the cheap tuning machine knobs I’d say this is a low-end Chinese guitar from the same factory that makes them for Turser, Oscar Schmidt, etc.

yeah, looking again i think you're probably right.
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#19
If you look in through the f-holes is there not a label? in any case it's more than likely a korean, indonesian or chinese brand that shares a factory with other brands.
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