#1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VJuKl3eytU

Most of this song is in 4/4 swing.

At the 0:30 mark you get a weird rythm that doesn't fit in 4/4 if you keep counting in 4/4, it will eventually fall back in the groove (which is after the background singers stop).

I think when the background singers start to sing it changes to 6/8 for 1 bar. But after that bar I'm completely clueless on what the rest might be. It has no groove to it is a rest followed with a bunch of words that sound really mashed together.

How would I go around to figure these kind of things out?
#2
It's slow enough for me to consider it 12/8 instead of 4/4 with swing feel.

Intro:

And the drum fill there would be in the rests here:


It's not a time signature change as much as a polyrhythmic groove that takes a while to get into.
#3
Straight 4/4. Sounds like the drummer stretched one beat slightly, but it all times out to 4/4 if you concentrate and keep counting. Zappa was really good at using weird rhythms and so forth and sometimes oddball time signatures too, but this one is straight 4/4. It's one of my old favorites. I played it over and over (on the original vinyl LP) years ago and counted that one out trying to figure out the same thing. It's 4/4 with some weird rhythm patterns by the drummer and the first time it sounds like he stretched one beat slightly. Really tight band, they kept the timing really well.

The drum fill itself gives the illusion of a difference in timing, but if you set up a metronome, it's really close all the way through. It's been 30 years so I can't remember, I think it does get off a little, but during that section, it stays right on beat for 4/4 even though it sounds like it's totally different timing. Then the sped up sense of the backup vocals adds to the illusion of a timing change. But it stays right on time if you concentrate on it. Except for that very first one, I've always thought the drummer stretched it just a little.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#4
It just changes to straight 8ths/16ths.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#5
^Yep. Total 4/4, they're just messing with your perception of time a bit.

Such is the glory of everyone in the band knowing where 1 is all the time, you no longer need to boldy announce it.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Yeah, I would think it in 12/8.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Right sorry. 12/8 shuffle. Not 4/4.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#10
12/8 is the same thing as 4/4 with triplets. So it could be either. But because it's so slow, I would notate it in 12/8.

It doesn't really matter, it just changes the way you notate it. If you notated it in 4/4, the measure you are asking about is still in 4/4, but with straight 8ths/16ths. If you notated it in 12/8, look at NeoMvsEu's post.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115