#1
yo,

so i'm thinking of using multiple amps with one guitar, i have two at the moment, but considering i cant always play them out loud, i was thinking of getting a mixer to bring the amps into one pair of headphones.

i've been looking at these cheap behringers as i only really need 3 inputs as of now and i don't need to spend lots on a higher quality one as its just for home use, maybe recording if i ever get back into it.

will this do what i want? 2-3 amps being sent to one pair of headphones?

http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/502.aspx

since this has stereo inputs i could plug an amp in the left jack and another in the right jack and it would be panned to each ear correct? or is that not the intended use?

also is the only difference out of that and this one below that it can be used as a recording interface? i dont know if i need that functionality but its around the same price..

http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/Q502USB.aspx

thanks.
#2
If you want to record stuff, I suggest you go into the recording section and read the introduction to recording sticky.

As for that mixer, it wouldn't work.
Amps produce a lot of power, and plugging a power output into a line input results in a fried line input and possibly a fried output transformer about as soon as you play something.

The easy way to do that would be to ditch the amps and use some amp sims on your computer or getting some sort of POD.

For more info, refer to the amp sims sticky in the recording section.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
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Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Not to be rude, but it also seems like a terrible waste of money. If you can't always play loud, then just play one amp quietly or use headphones if that is an option. If you're going to invest in a mixer, don't invest in a dinky piece of crap like that. You'd be better off burning your cash than buying that behringer. Save up and get a nicer mixer that you can use in the future for other projects or live scenarios.
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Last edited by ThunderPunk at Jun 9, 2015,
#4
i think we have a misunderstanding, i'm not using the mixer for recording.

i need to use three amps, i will be using two at the moment, this is because i have pitch shifting going on and cant use just one amp. this is why using amp sims and such won't work here.

you said the amp has a powered output? even if i plug the headphone out of the amp into the input on the mixer?

i dont need any good quality stuff because there are no future projects i would need a mixer for. when they come around i'll buy something good.
money is an issue here thats why i need to spend less than $100.

all i need is something that sends 2-3 headphone outputs into one pair of headphones.


out of curiosity, how do bands send their amps and stuff to a live mix when in session?
Last edited by GuitarHawk99 at Jun 9, 2015,
#5
If the amps have headphones output then the mixer idea will work.
Most headphones outputs on guitar amps sound pretty bad tho, so you might wanna look at different solutions.

What is it that you wanna achieve exactly and why?

In a live mix they place a mic or two in front of the cab of every amp, send everything to the FOH, then the sound guy mixes everything and sends it back to the main speakers.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#6
well my rig uses a guitar signal to one amp, and if i get the opportunity i split it into two guitar amps for a bigger sound, and i also split into a bass amp pitch shifted down an octave, a royal blood style setup but in reverse.

i'm not really fussed about the sound quality of the headphone outputs, i've been using headphones on my amp for the whole time i've had it.

ok thanks for the input
#7
So, you want your guitar signal going into three different amps, then from the amps, into a set of headphones?

You'll need some form of an a/b/y set up to run three amps at once.

Do all of your amps have a line out or headphone jack?

If all of your amps have a line out, go for it. That's the only way you can do it without mic action going on, in which case, that defeats the point of playing quietly. Just a warning though, it is more than likely going to sound like pure rubbish. You may want to invest in some speaker emulator pedals or something.

I still think you should invest in a higher quality mixer though.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
Last edited by ThunderPunk at Jun 9, 2015,
#8
yeah i mean theres no harm in trying i guess, thats all i needed to know if the mixer would suit this, i'll see

thanks guys
#9
Quote by GuitarHawk99
i was thinking of getting a mixer to bring the amps into one pair of headphones..


Nope.

Ker-Boom. Smoke. Lack of sound.
You can MIKE each of the amps and bring the signals from the mikes into one pair of headphones, but that's a different thing entirely.
You can run a bunch of preamps into a mixer and from there into a single set of headphones, but that's also a different thing entirely.

For example, I've got a Mesa Triaxis (tube preamp, but NOT an amplifier)), a Carvin Quad-X (tube preamp, but not an amplifier), several Pods, some keyboards and electronic drums and... All of which can be run into a mixer.

Amps, no.
#10
Lot of questions that need to be asked. If you are using tube amps, then you need to put a load on the the output. If you are using SS amps then you can ignore that. Next you need to pad the signal levels from the speaker output down to a level the mixer can handle. The Behringer Ultra-G can do that. You need one for each amp. Plus it offers a speaker sim, which is important. If your amps have headphone outputs then that simplifies a lot. The Behringer mixer will work fine.
#11
Quote by GuitarHawk99
yeah i mean theres no harm in trying i guesss


There's no harm in asking, but if tube amps are involved, there MAY be harm in trying.
#12
That mixer is perfect for your purposes. I used one to run in ear monitors for a 2 piece band for about 4 years for live shows at about a dozen venues. I ran the headphone out to the monitor transmitter and the regular outputs to the house thru a stereo DI box.

Don't waste your money on the USB version though.

What you're doing sounds more like Deap Vally or Local H (without the bass pickup) than like Royal Blood.

Have fun with it!
#13
You want to mic 3 amps and use mixer? That'll work but look for other than Beringer, their headphone pres are god awful. Mackie, Yamaha, used Allen Heath,etc..
Direct will most likely sound like crap unless you use speaker emulated direct boxes like HK Redbox.
Last edited by diabolical at Jun 9, 2015,
#14
Quote by dspellman
There's no harm in asking, but if tube amps are involved, there MAY be harm in trying.
Guy said he wants to use headphones outputs tho, so I'm guessing no tube amps are involved, and even so they would just need to be connected to a load.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#15
Quote by Spambot_2
Guy said he wants to use headphones outputs tho, so I'm guessing no tube amps are involved, and even so they would just need to be connected to a load.


And of course I completely misread the original post.
#17
ok guys lets simplify this.
yes i'm using solid state.

im using the head phone outputs on my amps, even if i were using tubes i would use headphone outputs, no micing, no preamping just bringing 3 headphone outputs into one pair of headphones, thats why i dont think it will blow up the mixer.

whats this about connecting to a load? so i wont need to worry about this since im using SS?


Quote by SpeedSterHR

What you're doing sounds more like Deap Vally or Local H (without the bass pickup) than like Royal Blood.


yeh, i say royal blood as they are my influence although im doing the opposite of mike's rig, how does that guy in local h get the bass to play while hes playing chords? i saw he has a bass pickup or something but how is it picking up only one note at a time?

Edit: ahhh ok i watched a video on local h's rig, i see what hes doing now, thats something i've considered but the way im doing works well for me. do you know what hes doing to get a realistic bass guitar sound out of his guitars in term of his pedals? he said he uses only a bit of octave down on the bass signal.. but how would it sound like a bass without it being shifted a full octave down?
Last edited by GuitarHawk99 at Jun 10, 2015,
#18
Scott (from Local H) sends his bass pup signal thru the Boss octave, then into a Bass MFX, then into an Ampeg Bass Stack. Having seen him live, in a small venue, I'd say it doesn't really sound like a true bass, but he does get the low end in there to come up with a huge sound.

Same for Deap Vally, regarding the tone. I discovered them live at a small outdoor festival before I got into their CD and videos and Lindsey's tone just blows you away. When covering their songs, I just use a home-made A/B/Y-like pedal into a Zoom MS-50 for the bass side and a Digitech RP355 or a GNX4 (depending on the venue) for the fuzz guitar, with the Zoom's out going back into the signal chain thru the Digitechs' aux inputs. Sometimes I play that thru a Marshall stack, but usually just go direct into the house PA. Most venues I've played prefer direct and it's less of a hassle than lugging the stack around.

Important point about what you're doing: Be sure to use the right Y cable to convert the stereo signal coming out of the amp's headphone out to a pair of mono plugs (one left, one right) into the mixer. Otherwise you can screw up the solid state amp and the cheap mixer. Hosa makes what you need, but you might have to order it online. I've gotten mine from large Sam Ash stores, but Guitar Center and most other places didn't carry them.

Have fun, but be careful.
Last edited by SpeedSterHR at Jun 10, 2015,
#19
BTW, I talked w/Scott about his rig, and my impression is he's more of a player than a gear guy. He had a friend help out coming up with the mods, and there was a lot of trial and error. His focus is clearly on the musicianship and he doesn't seem to give a rat's ass about what model guitar he's playing, or how he could cut out a half-hour of set-up by mounting everything on a couple of pedal boards. He used 3 tuners instead of 1 A/B/Y. He didn't even bother starting over with a new pick guard after f-ing up the original thru the different bass pickup configurations. He set up and tore down his own stuff, then manned the merch line by himself for the next hour. But he can play, and didn't miss a beat even when his strap broke.
#20
So about the y cable thing, how would it cause damage to any components if I send the stereo headphone output into the mono input on the mixer? Wouldn't it just play the stereo signal in each ear of the headphones instead of having to re-split it by using stereo inputs?
#21
No.

Headphone outputs are stereo (TRS, i.e., tip, ring, sleeve). The sleeve is the ground, the ring is for the right channel, and the tip is for the left.

Each mixer input on that model is mono (TS, i.e. tip, sleeve). The sleeve is the ground, the ring is for the mono audio. Channel 1 has pre-amp and you can go in with a balanced XLR in that jack like to plug in a decent mic, or you can use the 1/4" jack for an unbalanced cable. Channels 2 and 3 are one set of left and right and Channels 4 and 5 are another. Each of those inputs can accept a balanced or unbalanced cable from a mono source, but things can get ugly if you try to use a stereo cable in them--they won't just automatically convert stereo to mono; they short out the right channel from the stereo source to ground.

It might not hurt anything in your setup, but I've blown mic inputs in gear experimenting like that before, so if you have a $100 budget, you're better off spending half on the mixer and a quarter to half on the right cables and Y adapters than on blowing several ~$50 mixers doing the trial and error thing.

With the right Y adapter you split the sleeve from the headphone jack to the sleeve on each plug on the other end, send the ring from the headphone jack to the tip on the right (red or orange) plug, and send the tip from the headphone jack to the tip on the left (black or grey) plug. So the bottom of the Y will probably have a black socket or plug, and at the top one plug will be black or grey (left) and the other red or orange (right).

If this isn't making sense, then perhaps this will:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phone_connector_(audio)
Last edited by SpeedSterHR at Jun 11, 2015,
#22
In case it didn't jump out at you or you didn't already know...

Right = Red = Ring

Sleeve always = ground

That's the key to remembering what does what in Stereo TRS plugs/jacks. In balanced TRS, then the sleeve and the ring are both grounds. It's also why you use stereo jacks to turn off active electronics and pedals automatically when unplugging the cables so you don't drain batteries. The mono sleeve bridges the ring in the jack to ground, and that contact in the jack goes to the ground in your battery.
#23
ok i understand what you are talking about, that idea wouldn't be too difficult i would just need to buy adapters aswell, i suppose i would need to pay more if i wanted a mixer that could accept stereo outputs aswell?

if i were to get this other style of mixer, apparently the output on this is mono, would there be a way to make this mono output become stereo for my headphones? just out of curiosity, but i think it would sound pretty terrible even if there was a way because i would be just sending a mono signal to both ears....

http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/MX400.aspx
Last edited by GuitarHawk99 at Jun 12, 2015,
#24
a lot of fuss for something that isn't going to be that much IMO.
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#25
Quote by GuitarHawk99
ok i understand what you are talking about, that idea wouldn't be too difficult i would just need to buy adapters aswell, i suppose i would need to pay more if i wanted a mixer that could accept stereo outputs aswell?

if i were to get this other style of mixer, apparently the output on this is mono, would there be a way to make this mono output become stereo for my headphones? just out of curiosity, but i think it would sound pretty terrible even if there was a way because i would be just sending a mono signal to both ears....

http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/MX400.aspx


No. You'd still need the Y adapters because your headphone out on the amp is stereo, and you'd need an extra adapter to go back from mono coming out of the 4-channel mixer to your headphones--unless you only want to hear it in your left ear.

It would be hard to find a mixer that takes stereo 1/4 inputs at any price. If you really want to do this, then just get the Y cables or make your own custom cable if you have the skills--but good plugs/jacks and cable will cost you more than pre-made Y cables. I've made my own special application cables before, but it's only worth it when what you need isn't available off the shelf already.
#26
Have I got this right OP? You run three amps and just want to be able to hear all three through headphones to practice, a bit of mixing and then possible recording?

If that is it well the second choice (with the USB) will work perfectly for you.

Just run from either "line out" or "Effects Loop Send" if you have one into the mixer. Then use the balance or pan to send it to either left or right. simple. Run out from headphones on the amp if needed but line level signal is best. Headphones out on my amps require you turn volume down on the amp.

As for Behringer, I own some of their gear (not my best) but if you know how to use a mixer as to avoid clipping the signal you are good to go. I have seen their gear used in PA we have hired as well. For the money they are very acceptable. Also taking gear on the road is dangerous for theft and damage. It is not always viable to risk high end gear at gigs. So yes, Behringer has their place.

As for that mixer it is a little small but would be good for home single person recording. Effects might be a problem for vocals recording but I suppose you could record dry and apply at the DAW level.

Bottom line is yes there are better gear out there but if this little USB mixer is your full budget go for it. It will get the job done.