#1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-eH45_Xq9Q

I've been fixated on this record, partly because all the instruments have such a distinct tonality.

This song in particular though. Not exactly the type of guitar tone I'd go for, I prefer brighter somewhat shrill sounds, but I'm stumped as to how Newman is getting that deep, dense tone out of his guitar. Never heard anything like it. My guess is a combination of chorus, phaser at short rate, light to mid distortion on mid or neck position, with the treble rolled back and the bass up?

What do you think?
~GEAR~

'93 Fender Duo Sonic Reissue

'84 ProCo Smallbox RAT->Fulltone OCD->Akai E2 Headrush->Acoustic Model 470/Acoustic 105 4x12
#2
Double tracking makes a big difference especially if you offset them by a few milliseconds. Beyond that, a little modulation and distortion like you said. Again, offsetting the modulation in each track and the hard left/right pan makes a lot of difference. The tone itself doesn't sound particularly special to me, it's just clever studio work. The squealies make me think he's using a fuzz factory or something similar.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
Double tracking makes a big difference especially if you offset them by a few milliseconds. Beyond that, a little modulation and distortion like you said. Again, offsetting the modulation in each track and the hard left/right pan makes a lot of difference. The tone itself doesn't sound particularly special to me, it's just clever studio work. The squealies make me think he's using a fuzz factory or something similar.


Hm. Makes sense. Whenever I've recorded guitar tracks in the studio I've always double-tracked, but even then something about it strikes me.

The offset and studio tricks make sense. Gonna have to read up on production techniques. Any resources on that by any chance? By that I mean panning, offset, etc.
~GEAR~

'93 Fender Duo Sonic Reissue

'84 ProCo Smallbox RAT->Fulltone OCD->Akai E2 Headrush->Acoustic Model 470/Acoustic 105 4x12
#4
I know Tom Scholz (of Boston fame) used to thicken their tone by having one guitar be consistently just a couple cents out of tune with the other. Some kind of pitch shifting, octaver type effect might help there...

Phasers, rotary pedals, synths or simple delays might also help thicken your tone, used properly.

It could also be something as simple as an alternative tuning being used.

Or perhaps the insturment isn't what you think it is. I know some jazz fusion & prog rock guys will use piccolo basses and other exotic 6-stringed guitar-like but not guitars on occasion. Have unchecked the liner notes?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#5
Colin Newman/Wire have definitely used exotic instruments at times, but on this record I am pretty sure its straightforward guitar/bass/drums/synth. I know Newman has been using Eastwood guitars for just about his entire career. Interesting guitars, Eastwoods.

Given their experimental sensibilities I'm sure they're a band that would detune their instruments ever so slightly when double-tracking.

Don't own a copy of the album on CD or vinyl so I have no access to liner notes or anything of the sort.
~GEAR~

'93 Fender Duo Sonic Reissue

'84 ProCo Smallbox RAT->Fulltone OCD->Akai E2 Headrush->Acoustic Model 470/Acoustic 105 4x12
#6
Chorus and perhaps a muff-esque type of distortion.

The double tracking has been laid on very well. Where some people just aim to go for an accurate duplicate 2nd take and just let the natural offset do it's thang, Here he varies the feel a bit one pan a bit late, then a bit early, but it soundz like intended offset, and he also has small variations between the double tracks.

This is a different effect, and creates wide space in a slight variation.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jun 9, 2015,