#1
My budgets low right now so I can only spend around 300 so I'm basically gonna have to get a keyboard instead of a piano. I've never played either I just recently started wanting to learn, but pianos are crazy expensive.
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#2
The feel, mainly. Keyboards tend to have narrower keys as well. I also started on a keyboard before piano. When you move to a piano, it will feel a little strange but you'll get used to it.
#3
Is it possible to find one that sounds exactly like a piano, I don't one that sounds way too digital.
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#4
You can get real close - it's amazing what you can get for 300 (USD, EUR?) now.
#5
my sister got one a few years about that has "real touch" keys on it so they(the keys) feel weighted right like an actual piano.
and it sounds really good.

id look into items with a similar feature purely for the realism.
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#6
You really can't replicate the way a real piano sounds in a room with a digital piano. They will sound good when recorded, and you may not be able to hear a clear difference (on a record). But when you play it yourself, you will most likely notice a clear difference. It's in the way the instrument responds to your touch.

I think touch is more important than sound. So try digital pianos in your price range and buy the one that feels best to play. And you definitely want one with weighted keys.

You may also want to look at used stuff.

$300 isn't much. That's what cheapest digital pianos cost, so don't expect too much from it. (I would guess a mid priced one would be around $1000.) But I don't know. I haven't really tried that many digital pianos (and I have little idea of the price of the ones I have tried). The thing is, nothing beats a real piano if you want real piano sounds. But usually digital pianos also come with a couple of other sounds like Rhodes, organ and strings.
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#7
Well I would buy a real piano in a heartbeat if I could afford it, I'm just looking for one to learn on right now.
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#8
I would get one with (semi) weighted keys. It won't be as good as a real piano, but it at least gives you touch to learn to play with dynamics and it also gives you stronger fingers. It's important to understand dynamic contrast, as I feel it's a big aspect in piano playing in almost every genre.

When you transfer you should not underestimate the human mind's capability to adjust. Like playing acoustic guitar or bass for the first time, it will feel weird compared to electric, but it won't take you years to relearn, and some people can adjust within a month or a week.

Also check the amount of keys. Technically you could play many piano pieces on a 66 key one, but 88 keys ensures you will never run in a problem where you run out of range on each end. Make sure to check the amount, cause digital pianos tend to come in 66 key versions very often.

On a last note, You have piano playing and keyboard playing. All instruments have developed ways of being played based on inherit qualities of the instrument. U can for example repeatedly stomp an E note very fast on a piano, but it won't have the same "sonic quality" like the intro riff of slayer's angel of death, if you understand what I mean.

If you want to learn to play piano, you can play on a keyboard/digital piano, but learn from piano sources and not keyboard sources.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jun 9, 2015,
#10
Quote by cdgraves
The most significant difference is about 400lb

depends on the piano


keyboards are absolutely very different. Definitely get one with weighted keys if you can. Tone doesn't really matter if you're just using it as a stepping stone to a real piano. But odds are if it's got weighted keys, it'll have a good sound.


I don't know where you are (in terms of currency) but this would be a great choice

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/keyboards-midi/williams-allegro-2-88-key-hammer-action-digital-piano


full 88 keys is also ideal. 61 and 71 or whatever is weird.
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#12
Quote by xxdarrenxx
I would get one with (semi) weighted keys. It won't be as good as a real piano, but it at least gives you touch to learn to play with dynamics and it also gives you stronger fingers.

I already play guitar so I think I got the finger strength down, but yeah I'll be sure to look for one with weighted keys.
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#13
also if you have to get a sustain pedal separately, definitely get it. You do not want to be without a sustain pedal.
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#15
Like Baby Joel says be sure to get a sustain pedal. If it only comes with a small switch type pedal spend another $30.00-40.00 and get a good one that looks like a normal piano sustain pedal. You'll find they are a lot better and you get the right feel like a real piano. I velcro my sustain pedal to a 10" x 10" inch board for better stability and you might consider that if yours moves around a lot especially in a carpeted room. The other benefit in getting a keyboard is midi capability. Most, if not all, keyboards come with midi capability. If you are not currently using any midi gear this is also a very good thing to learn about and a very useful tool for recording and maybe live work.
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#16
Quote by hurricane0202
Well I would buy a real piano in a heartbeat if I could afford it, I'm just looking for one to learn on right now.


If you check your local newspaper, Craigslist, etc or ask around on Facebook, there is usually someone local (by local I mean like up to a couple of hours away) that has an upright piano that they are looking to get rid of and as a result they usually will be asking maybe $100, maybe even giving it away. The catch is, as you can well imagine, you need to get a couple of buddies and a big enough vehicle and drive out to pick it up. But if you can do all that, you can certainly get an affordable piano. It probably won't be the best in the world or anything, but that's to be expected. The same thing also works for finding organs.
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#17
It's worth noting that you can turn the volume on a keyboard down, and also can take it to gigs (eventually). They also take up less space in your house.
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#18
Quote by hurricane0202
I already play guitar so I think I got the finger strength down, but yeah I'll be sure to look for one with weighted keys.

Totally different techniques (guitar and piano).

Why you want to have weighted keys is because of the feel. Non-weighted keys will feel like playing organ or something. You use different technique for that. I played on a non-weighted keyboard for a pretty long time, and I needed to relearn some technique when I started playing the real thing more often (well, I had never even learned any technique - I just played, but my hands never got tired. But when I played the real thing, my hands got tired pretty easily). It's also about the dynamics. On a weighted digital piano it's a lot easier to learn to control your dynamics.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#19
I played piano for years and yes there is a difference both in sound and feel. Sound can be mostly overcome with new technology, but IMO the only thing that feels like a piano is a piano.

But that's not a bad thing.

When I was learning.. I ONLY wanted to play on a real piano,.. but then when I wanted to play on a keyboard or digital piano or synthesizer.. I simply COULDN'T. (you can of course learn to do both very well.. like learning on a heavy gauge jumbo acoustic AND an itty bitty electric.. but i didn't put the time in.)

So if because of your budget, your hands will first master the dynamics of a keyboard, that's not at all a bad thing.
#20
Quote by hurricane0202
I already play guitar so I think I got the finger strength down, but yeah I'll be sure to look for one with weighted keys.


Yeah, like Maggara said, that's not the same thing.

And the reason that you want weighted keys isn't to improve finger strength. It's because non-weighted keys don't feel like a piano, and if you learn with them, you're going to feel very strange when you make the switch to a real piano, and it'll take some serious getting used to.

I love the feel of synth/keyboard style non-weighted keys if I'm playing pad sounds, or a lead synth, or something like that. But to actually play a piano sound, and to play it like a piano, you need those weighted keys. It's just not right without it. You won't develop the feel for soft/hard dynamic playing.
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#21
for what it's worth, finger strength really doesn't play that much of a role in piano. It's just a matter of getting used to the keys and knowing how you want to play them.

what does matter is hand stretch. Starts out crap, then becomes at least good enough to hit 9ths, after that you can cheat it in.

but yeah, weighted keys for sure. Even though it won't have the same feel as a real piano, it'll help you get used to the feel of weighted keys
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#22
Quote by Baby Joel
for what it's worth, finger strength really doesn't play that much of a role in piano. It's just a matter of getting used to the keys and knowing how you want to play them.

what does matter is hand stretch. Starts out crap, then becomes at least good enough to hit 9ths, after that you can cheat it in.

but yeah, weighted keys for sure. Even though it won't have the same feel as a real piano, it'll help you get used to the feel of weighted keys

What about semi weighted, I'm looking at this one right now
http://www.amazon.com/Yamaha-YPG-235-76-Key-Portable-Premium/dp/B003FRMRC4/ref=sr_1_1?s=musical-instruments&ie=UTF8&qid=1433986094&sr=1-1&keywords=piano&refinements=p_36%3A20000-30000%2Cp_n_feature_keywords_two_browse-bin%3A5052399011%7C5052401011
Quote by MeTallIcA313
Guys, you heard Mr. Sacamano. No fun until racism is over.
#23
If you really want the piano sound and feel primarily, and aren't concerned about having a whole bunch of crazy synth noises as well, get a digital piano. The Yamaha ones are very nice, though they are expensive. I don't have much experience with any lower end models, so I can't speak to their playability. This one, I've played, and it feels great. Very natural, and like a real piano. Plus the sound is dynamic and very clean, especially if you plug it into a larger speaker or keyboard amp. And there's some pretty decent string and organ sounds, too.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#24
Quote by hurricane0202

aye, that'll do you fine. I grew up with a yamaha keyboard, and they're pretty decent.
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#25
Do all keyboards/MIDI controllers with weighted keys react audibly to how hard you press the keys, like a real piano would? Or do some of them only have the "feel" but with a digital sound (key is either being pressed or not)?

I'm thinking about trying to learn piano/keyboard and am a bit overwhelmed by the options availabe. I'd also like to be able to play some synth sounds with it which further complicates things. A lot of people say synth stuff is easier to play without weighted keys, but I really think I'd want/need the weighted keys for the actual piano stuff I'd be playing. Am I just hoping for too much expecting to get both great piano sounds and synth playing from the same thing?

P.S. I'm not really concerned with onboard speaker quality since I'd probably be playing it through my studio monitors and headphones anyway (the same way I play guitar), maybe even through the computer if I went with a MIDI controller.
Last edited by bptrav at Jun 23, 2015,
#26
If it has weighted keys, the attack of the note will change depending on how lightly or softly or slowly or whatever. So yeah, weighted keys is the closest you'll ever get from a keyboard.
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#27
Quote by bptrav
Do all keyboards/MIDI controllers with weighted keys react audibly to how hard you press the keys, like a real piano would? Or do some of them only have the "feel" but with a digital sound (key is either being pressed or not)?


Pretty much an keyboard period that isn't either an analog synth or cheap piece of crap will have velocity sensitive keys. You have the option of turning it on or off and usually can adjust the sensitivity. Also some keyboards, mainly digital synths, allow you to assign the velocity to control other parameters such as attack speed or filter depth.
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