#1
I'm going to buy a Prs se torero soon and I found a really good deal on a white one... I like the white a lot but I'm concerned about it turning yellow. Does anybody know how to slow down or prevent it from happening? Thanks for any help
#3
Keep it out of the sun, keep it in the case, don't smoke around it or gig it in smoky bars. Don't put stickers or weird stuff on the finish. Wipe it down often, polishing it probably helps somewhat.

It's probably going to yellow eventually, but if you are careful you can hold it off for a long time. I imagine modern paints/clearcoats are going to hold on to their brightness for a lot longer than older white guitars, plus a lot of those were gigged in smoky bars for 30 years.
#6
Quote by Roc8995
How do we know?


changes in paint used. if you look at used guitars from the last 10 years or so they seem to retain the white with no yellowing. the only exceptions may be nitro covered guitars. PRS doesn't use nitro on most of their models.
#7
The joke was that all we know for sure is that they don't yellow in 10 years

You're right though, I'm sure they're quite a lot more pervasive than the old white finishes.
#9
Quote by EthanMiles
I'm going to buy a Prs se torero soon and I found a really good deal on a white one... I like the white a lot but I'm concerned about it turning yellow. Does anybody know how to slow down or prevent it from happening? Thanks for any help


The old nitrocellulose finishes (still used on Gibsons) are essentially cellulose (in paper or cotton form) that's been nitrated by combining it with nitric acid in the presence of sulfuric acids. Both of those acids are actually present in nitrocellulose. This stuff dries, but does not cure. Over time, nitrocellulose breaks down, and it does it more rapidly in the presence of UV light, etc. This disintegration process discolors (yellows) the color, embrittles the finish and helps cause cracks and checks to appear in the finish, leaving behind a chalky residue. It was originally car lacquer, but was abandoned for that use in the 50's. It also imprinted any imperfections in the surface below it on the top surface of the paint over time, leading some to believe it was a thin finish. It's not. It happened with cars with 30 coats of hand-rubbed lacquer.

Modern car finishes, such as the UV-catalyzed polyesters, are cured within 24 hours, remain clear/retain original color, don't shrink or embrittle over time, and are self-leveling (means that they fill in surface imperfections and produce a glossy finish). It's possible to have a very smooth, glossy finish but have a much thinner coat of paint that protects the guitar better. Some mistake this smooth gloss for a thick coat of paint and grump that the guitar has been "dipped in plastic." While it's possible to produce a thick coat of paint using this process, it's not necessary, and these finishes can actually be more protective of your guitar and have a cleaner gloss with a relatively thin paint depth.

Most large manufacturers have moved to more modern finishes, in part because they dry so much faster and allow faster production. Yours is likely one of those. As previously mentioned, exercise proper caution and keep the guitar out of the sun and in the case when not in use if you want to make sure that it isn't going to yellow significantly.