#1
I have been playing guitar on and off for three years and i can play any chords i have come across so far with ease and shifting is also good. As for lead guitar, my i've worked on my pinky finger and now can play most solos at same or decent speeds with the correct timings and feeling.

Now getting to the point, i want to work my way through learning specific genres of music, i'm not very good with music theory and stuff however i do have basic knowledge. Can you please help me with what to learn and how to proceed to start playing these genres. What i am basically looking for is theory (Scales, common patterns, power chord progressions, family of chords which sound good together and stuff).
#2
?? You want to learn how to play metal/rock? Just play metal/rock songs. What the hell is the point in just learning the theory behind a genre with absolutely no context? There are hundreds of different sub genres of rock and metal, and you didn't even specify which ones you're interested in. That'd be like saying "I want to learn nature" without specifying if you want to learn ecosystems, marine life, plants, animals, insects etc.

If you want to "learn these genres" (which is kind of a backwards idea, since you can't "learn" an entire genre of music since it's always evolving and has so many sub genres) you're just going to have to play music from these genres, and incorporate the characteristics of everything you learn into your playing, you don't just go "I have finished learning metal, now I can play metal, on to the next genre". Trying to understand theory should come AFTER the music, not before, otherwise it's theory for the sake of theory.

And what's the point in it? Do you actually like these genres, or you just doing it for the sake of learning stuff you'll never need? Because I can tell you right now that no matter how hard you'll try you'll never finish learning ANY genre, there's ALWAYS something new to learn from any genre. If you don't like the genres you're wasting your time. Otherwise learning metal would be this:
- Use minor scale
- Play heavy/cool riffs
If that answers your question, then great.
#3
Quote by varundbest
I have been playing guitar on and off for three years and i can play any chords i have come across so far with ease and shifting is also good. As for lead guitar, my i've worked on my pinky finger and now can play most solos at same or decent speeds with the correct timings and feeling.

Now getting to the point, i want to work my way through learning specific genres of music, i'm not very good with music theory and stuff however i do have basic knowledge. Can you please help me with what to learn and how to proceed to start playing these genres. What i am basically looking for is theory (Scales, common patterns, power chord progressions, family of chords which sound good together and stuff).



Scales: Common scales are Pentatonic Minor, Blues, Natural Minor, Harmonic Minor

Common Patterns:

I IV V in Major
i IV i in Minor
i V in Minor
i VII VI VII in Minor
i VII VI V7 in Minor

Power Chord Progressions:

B5 D5 E5 G5 F#5 G5 F#5 G5
E5 G5 A5 C5 D5
A5 D5 A5 E5
A5 G5 F5 E5
A5 C5 D5

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 10, 2015,
#4
If you want to learn to play in a lot of different styles just start by learning some basic theory and one thing will lead to the next. Learning how to play blues is good place to start because it gets you into a lot of basic major and minor scales and their chord relationships and is a little easier to understand.

I admire your interest in learning to play in different genres. I've said before that my personal goal is to be a guitar player, not a rock guitarist, not a metal guitarist, not a jazz guitarist, but someone who can work comfortably in any style of playing. Good luck.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#5
What JimJam said.

1. Learn song

2. Find cool part

3. Go "What the HELL is this and why does it sound so cool (or uncool)"

4. Learn the theory, know why

5. Integrate it into your own playing/writing

6. Repeat 1-5 until you grow to the point where you stop needing to learn other people's music because your ears and chops are at a super high level, and you get how things tend to work enough to work out your own concepts without basing them off a previously existing piece.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
Quote by Jet Penguin

1. Learn song

2. Find cool part

3. Go "What the HELL is this and why does it sound so cool (or uncool)"

4. Learn the theory, know why

5. Integrate it into your own playing/writing

6. Repeat 1-5 until you grow to the point where you stop needing to learn other people's music because your ears and chops are at a super high level, and you get how things tend to work enough to work out your own concepts without basing them off a previously existing piece.


This.

Really though, those five points should be written on every board in music schools around the world. The best way to grow into the musician you are meant to be is learn the music you love and learn to understand it, recreate it and mold it into something of your own.

Hal Galper once said that the music that you love it trying to teach you something about your own playing that you don't already know. In his case it was Bill Evans music telling him that his chordal playing was sub-par. If you listen to and learn the music by the rock/metal bands that you love, you will develop the skills you want to take from them. It can be riffing, it can be solo inspired material, it can be rhythms etc. Just learn it and internalize it, and you will be fine.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#7
Hell. Yes.

At least until you get into jazz.

And then eventually, years later, realize that tonal music in general is just silly.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
As for songs, i know intro of Fear of the dark (About 2 minutes and then i know the rhythm), Main riff of The Trooper, 18 and life solo and some other stuff in metal. And by - 'I want to learn metal' i meant, the basic idea behind metal, the 'feel' of the music. But i see that some people just wish to portray how great they are.

In the end, i just want to be able to play something which comes onto my mind and know where the notes are for which i am learning notes on fretboard, CAGED system and other things. Currently, this seems cool -

http://www.musictheoryforguitar.com/metalguitarscales.html
#9
^Seems cool, but isn't. Trust me. That's just giving you exotic sounds without any discussion of application beyond "it's metal"

The most efficient way to integrate new scales and scalar playing is through learning your major/minor/pentatonic and harmonic minor scales.

After you do that, begin learning the basic principles of Chord Scale Theory, and integrating scales from the other "systems" we use in tonal music (MM, HW, Hmaj, etc.)

All those "obscure" and "exotic" metal scales are just different configurations of what is found in the systems from above. The difference being, you'll actually know how to apply all of the information instead of randomly busting out Phrygian Dominant whenever you feel like it.

Which is cool too, I guess, but learning a billion scales is going to be semi-counterproductive .
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#10
Quote by Jet Penguin
^Seems cool, but isn't. Trust me. That's just giving you exotic sounds without any discussion of application beyond "it's metal"

The most efficient way to integrate new scales and scalar playing is through learning your major/minor/pentatonic and harmonic minor scales.

After you do that, begin learning the basic principles of Chord Scale Theory, and integrating scales from the other "systems" we use in tonal music (MM, HW, Hmaj, etc.)

All those "obscure" and "exotic" metal scales are just different configurations of what is found in the systems from above. The difference being, you'll actually know how to apply all of the information instead of randomly busting out Phrygian Dominant whenever you feel like it.

Which is cool too, I guess, but learning a billion scales is going to be semi-counterproductive .


Any source to get that knowledge?
#11
Quote by varundbest
Any source to get that knowledge?


I'm glad you replied. I'm the one that posted the "answers" you were asking for specific to your questions. I see know that you don't seek answers. You seek knowledge.

Knowledge is better. Knowledge helps you find your own answers.

There are lots of sources, but as Jet pointed out, something that might seem good, may actually be setting you back.

Is getting a private teacher or lessons, an option for you?

A good teacher can guide you through this process.

Best,

Sean
#12
Quote by Sean0913
I'm glad you replied. I'm the one that posted the "answers" you were asking for specific to your questions. I see know that you don't seek answers. You seek knowledge.

Knowledge is better. Knowledge helps you find your own answers.

There are lots of sources, but as Jet pointed out, something that might seem good, may actually be setting you back.

Is getting a private teacher or lessons, an option for you?

A good teacher can guide you through this process.

Best,

Sean


Thanks for the reply, i've contacted 5-7 teachers near me and i am above their skillset. They were like, kids come to us for 6 months and then leave, all they can teach are basic chords, finger exercises, bar chords and a billion scales.... I'm thinking of learning songs through Lick Library and then going to theory with Andy James lessons and other DVDs from them and if i come across any problem i'll go for Skype sessions.
#14
Quote by varundbest
Oh god, i'm up for this twelve part course!!! -

http://www.guitarworld.com/achieving-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-1


Sounds like you got it sorted then! Best of luck to you.

Took a look at the page, you linked to. I would never go that route, but let us know how it works for you.

Best,

Sean
#15
Quote by Sean0913
Sounds like you got it sorted then! Best of luck to you.

Took a look at the page, you linked to. I would never go that route, but let us know how it works for you.

Best,

Sean


Why wouldn't you go that route? I've gone through first part and now practicing meandering...
Seems like a great idea to know the fretboard first and now i can actually find the A Minor pentatonic all over the fretboard...