#1
Hi, I am looking for the 5 movable box shape patterns for the b minor blues scale, if you could provide a link or the diagrams for me it would be tremendously appreciated. Thanksb
#2
The notes in Bm pentatonic are B D E F# A. I suggest locating those notes up and down the neck before getting into box patterns. The blues scale is the same as the pentatonic, but with an F natural added.

Guitar teachers spend a lot of time getting people "out" of box patterns they learned prematurely, so I'd make sure to understand what's in those patterns first.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jun 12, 2015,
#3
I need the box shapes because my singer is coming over tonight and we are going to cover the thrill is gone, I wont have time to do what you said.
#4
Well, then use Google. But seriously, it doesn't take that much time - just find the notes on the fretboard. And if you figure it out on your own, it becomes a lot easier to understand.


Though there is a "shortcut":

Do you know any other blues scales (for example Am or Em blues)? If yes, you could use the same boxes, but move them up or down. If you know the Am blues, you can just move all the notes 2 frets up, and you get the Bm blues. Or if you know the Em blues, just move all the notes 7 frets up or 5 frets down.


All blues scales have the same pattern. The intervals between the notes are the same in all blues scales, and that's what makes all blues scales sound like blues scales. The intervals are the same (1, b3, 4, b5, 5, b7), they just have different roots.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jun 12, 2015,
#5
Quote by Frenetixx
I need the box shapes because my singer is coming over tonight and we are going to cover the thrill is gone, I wont have time to do what you said.



Well it's certainly not a one day process. Do you know the chords in the song already? You'll be playing rhythm for a lot more time than you'll be soloing, and it's not the end of the world if your solo is just playing notes from the chords one at a time (which is actually an extremely useful approach to learning how to solo).

Go ahead and look it up if you need info immediately, but do check back here for guidance how to really do a good solo for that tune, as there's more to it than the basic scale. Myself and others are well equipped to provide assistance on soloing for minor blues.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jun 12, 2015,
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