#1
Hey ya'll,

I'm trying to learn this song by Tomo Fujita:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amtpG-5T-WI&list=FLpwgqnPUhqa8J87BEUNNZOg&index=10

I'm getting the hang of it, but there's a move he does at 0:50 and again at 0:57 where he kind of graces his fingers up the neck with the fingers pointing straight out; his knuckles appear to be unbent and he seems to slap the frets. It's almost like his fingers are in a wave formation. Does anyone out there know how to do this?! Tomo plays it so fast that it's really hard to tell.

Pax Caritas et lol,
-Wakana
#2
Quote by wakana
Hey ya'll,

I'm trying to learn this song by Tomo Fujita:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amtpG-5T-WI&list=FLpwgqnPUhqa8J87BEUNNZOg&index=10

I'm getting the hang of it, but there's a move he does at 0:50 and again at 0:57 where he kind of graces his fingers up the neck with the fingers pointing straight out; his knuckles appear to be unbent and he seems to slap the frets. It's almost like his fingers are in a wave formation. Does anyone out there know how to do this?! Tomo plays it so fast that it's really hard to tell.

Pax Caritas et lol,
-Wakana



He's just string raking it's a really common technique used in funk where instead of picking individual notes they'll mute all the other strings that they're not playing, and play one individual note with a strum like technique; all while strumming the rest of the muted strings. It really gives the licks that he's playing a more fuller percussive sound. I also noticed that when he's playing triads that he's doing the same exact thing. Basically just muting the other strings he's not playing with his thumb (which are the low E, A, and sometimes the D string; hitting them to give the higher registered triads a more fuller percussive sound.


EDIT- I just found a video explaining the technique, and also it sounds fast because he's using pull offs while string raking. You can get some fast string raked funk licks going on while using legato. I think it's great to add string raking to your arsenal of techniques because it can really change the way you sound; all while making your lead playing sound more rhythmic, and dynamic if this technique is used properly.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VqXo3inORs

^ Link to video

Here's another good video demonstrating the technique skip to :06, and you can clearly see Johns fingers doing the same exact thing as Tomo's, but instead of pull offs he's playing the riff string raking hammer on's. In general he's using a lot of string raked licks that he's playing especially when he adds vibrato to the raked notes that he's hitting. Like I said it makes everything sound more "full, and rhythmic".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aGLY87lEPw

Link to video ^
Last edited by Black_devils at Jun 13, 2015,
#4
Quote by wakana
Hey Black devils,

Thanks for the response. I'm not talking about the raking though. I'm talking about the little riff he plays at 0:50 and again at 0:57 where he graces his fingers up the neck like his fingers are in a wave formation.

Pax Caritas et lol,
-Clark



Bro I just mentioned what he was doing he's just string raking pull offs, and that's giving the riff he's doing a really thick, chunky sound... His fingers are doing the wave like motion because he's muting the bottom strings with the bottom of his fingers while doing the pull offs so he can't just completely lift his fingers off. He has to still mute the rest of the strings he's strummed to keep that sound he's going for intact.


That's the whole point of the technique, and that's why his fingers look like they're flying or for your case a "wave". I'll give you a basic explanation for the technique. You pretty much mute all the strings you're not playing whether it's higher or low with the tip of your finger or thumb or the bottom of your fingers.


Then you proceed to strum all 6 strings only letting the one note your fretting ring out; all while hitting, all 6 strings. You can even slow down the video for yourself to see it's right there. There's no magic trick it's really simple lol..


EDIT- Look at it for yourself he's not even picking a single string while he plays the riff he's doing all down strums hitting all 6 strings.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jun 17, 2015,
#5
Never mind, I figured out what I was doing wrong. You're right, Black Devils, he is raking, but the problem I was having was to do with the strumming rhythm. I find that with funk playing strumming is always the part that throws me just a little bit off, but then after I get the hang of doing it the correct way, the riff becomes really easy.
#6
Quote by wakana
Never mind, I figured out what I was doing wrong. You're right, Black Devils, he is raking, but the problem I was having was to do with the strumming rhythm. I find that with funk playing strumming is always the part that throws me just a little bit off, but then after I get the hang of doing it the correct way, the riff becomes really easy.



God damn you should of been more specific! I can only help you by what you're giving me to go on . By the way if you're talking about the timing of the riff all it really was is a sextuplet rhythm or 16th note triplet rhythm.

Or to put into really simple terms "6 notes per beat" I do have to agree with you that funk does tend to throw people off because it's very syncopated, but all in all it's not really that hard once you get it down. If anything funk has to do with a lot of rhythm it's nothing really complicated what they're doing, but the rhythms do tend to get more on the complex side of things.

EDIT- Also the way the riff was being played was all down strums. He's pretty much doing 3 strums in a beat while also adding 3 pull offs between the 1st, and 3rd finger going down from the A to G string. So 3 strums between the 3 descending pull offs equals a sextuplet rhythm. I just wanted to state that just in case you were still kind of confused what was going on during the riff. Remember that it's 6 notes in a beat so if you really want to get it down you have to play it exactly the way he's doing it to get that semi speedy, flashy sound.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jun 18, 2015,