#1
so i decided to move my pedal board around in this format:
guitar>reverb>flanger>phaser>blues driver>fuzz face>distortion>tuner>amp

upon doing this i get a crazy amount of hum/noise when i power on my fuzz/distortion pedals, which are closest to the amp. previoulsy i had my pedal board reversed and had no such issue. is there a way to prevent this without buying a Noise reducer?

*checked my 9V power supply and tested different cables with no luck

thanks,
#2
Switch 'em back? Is there something about the order you have 'em in now that you prefer over the previous order? Does your amp have an fx loop? There are no set rules for pedal order but I would think modulation pedals before gain pedals would be pretty muddy, if not noisy.
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#3
Quote by softshell
so i decided to move my pedal board around in this format:
guitar>reverb>flanger>phaser>blues driver>fuzz face>distortion>tuner>amp

previoulsy i had my pedal board reversed and had no such issue. ,


You're pretty much exactly backwards to the way most folks will suggest that you order your pedals.

This is the order generally recommended (the tuner usually is the very first thing in the order)...


Guitar --> Signal conditioners --> Filter effects --> Pitch related effects --> Modulation effects --> Volume/Level effects --> Echo and time-based effects --> Amp




Signal conditioners - Pedals that only alter the general sound by increasing gain and optionally changing the EQ. Includes preamp, overdrive, boost, distortion, fuzz and compressor pedals.

Filter effects - Pedals that adjust the frequency response by enhancing, notching out, or shaping the frequencies in certain ranges. Includes wah, envelope filter, and EQ pedals.

Volume/Level effects - Pedals that cause changes in the overall signal by increasing or decreasing level, or controlling certain peaks. Includes volume, tremolo, and noise gate pedals. A compressor could be considered in this category because of its volume control and ability to smooth peaks and valleys in a signal.

Modulation effects - Pedals that modulate the original sound by introducing several signals to interact with the others in order to produce frequencies otherwise not present. Includes chorus, flanger, phase shifting, and rotary simulating pedals. Vibrato could also be considered in this category.

Pitch related effects - Pedals that alter the pitch of the signal by adding octaves or bending the pitch. Includes octave and pitch shifting pedals such as a whammy. Vibrato could also be considered in this category.

Echo and time-based effects - Pedals that simulate the original introduction of the sound by copying and repeating the sound or through an echo effect. Includes delay, reverb, and echo pedals.


#5
Quote by lucky1978
Switch 'em back? Is there something about the order you have 'em in now that you prefer over the previous order? Does your amp have an fx loop? There are no set rules for pedal order but I would think modulation pedals before gain pedals would be pretty muddy, if not noisy.


i do not have an fx loop.

i realize that this is not the normal way of pedal orientation. but i like the way it sounds. all the pedals that have volume knobs are closest to my amp now, so i think thats the issue, so not sure of how to sort it out without moving them back.

I tried turning the volume knobs on the pedals low and using my amp for all volume, but it still produces high hum/noise
#6
OK mate can accept it's not the "ideal" order but you like it that way. Everybody wants their own unique tone.

As for trying to help you here are some possible "Long Shots". Hard to know without seeing it.

- http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/HD400.aspx Have a look at this. The pedals in this custom order may just behave badly with the mains AC power. This "may" clean it up by putting it somewhere in the chain. Or try poweringf the whole rig in another location. Could be work OK somewhere else.

- From PA stuff make sure everything is running from the same powerboard and power supply. I know it worked in a certain pedal order before but you never know.

- Maybe you need better quality or thicker/more shielded cables & leads to run the pedals in this order. Hard to say. Don't know what your using.

- Other things, maybe the wiring in your axe does not lend to this config. Active or passive pickups? Do you have High & Low inputs on your amp. Could be certain pedals placed right next to each other interfere with each other.

All longshots but worth a try if you really want this chain to work.

Wish you well trying to work it out
Last edited by Yola_Yola at Jun 13, 2015,
#7
Quote by Yola_Yola
OK mate can accept it's not the "ideal" order but you like it that way. Everybody wants their own unique tone.

As for trying to help you here are some possible "Long Shots". Hard to know without seeing it.

- http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/HD400.aspx Have a look at this. The pedals in this custom order may just behave badly with the mains AC power. This "may" clean it up by putting it somewhere in the chain. Or try poweringf the whole rig in another location. Could be work OK somewhere else.

- From PA stuff make sure everything is running from the same powerboard and power supply. I know it worked in a certain pedal order before but you never know.

- Maybe you need better quality or thicker/more shielded cables & leads to run the pedals in this order. Hard to say. Don't know what your using.

- Other things, maybe the wiring in your axe does not lend to this config. Active or passive pickups? Do you have High & Low inputs on your amp. Could be certain pedals placed right next to each other interfere with each other.

All longshots but worth a try if you really want this chain to work.

Wish you well trying to work it out



thanks fro the recommendations.....gonna see if they help out.
#8
Quote by softshell
thanks fro the recommendations.....gonna see if they help out.


No worries mate. Try to take a process of elimination approach. Try a different guitar, try powering in another location. Take one pedal out of the chain at a time or try another amp etc. Maybe an EQ pedal in the chain may identify the frequency.

Let us know how it goes

Good luck
Last edited by Yola_Yola at Jun 13, 2015,
#9
Quote by Yola_Yola
No worries mate. Try to take a process of elimination approach. Try a different guitar, try powering in another location. Take one pedal out of the chain at a time or try another amp etc. Maybe an EQ pedal in the chain may identify the frequency.

Let us know how it goes

Good luck



after messing around this morning the humming has significantly dropped off. here is what i did:

*moved all my cheaper cables closest to the guitar, and my better cables to connect all tone changing pedals(distortion/fuzz/blues driver)

*of my 9v power supply plugged the (distortion/fuzz/blues driver) into the main power connecters, and the rest of the pedals i plugged in using the extender i bought.

moved my tuner to my guitar for better tuning, here is the setup:
guitar>tuner>reverb>flanger>phaser>blues driver>fuzz face>distortion>amp


thanks alot guys!
#10
Quote by softshell
after messing around this morning the humming has significantly dropped off. here is what i did:

*moved all my cheaper cables closest to the guitar, and my better cables to connect all tone changing pedals(distortion/fuzz/blues driver)

*of my 9v power supply plugged the (distortion/fuzz/blues driver) into the main power connecters, and the rest of the pedals i plugged in using the extender i bought.

moved my tuner to my guitar for better tuning, here is the setup:
guitar>tuner>reverb>flanger>phaser>blues driver>fuzz face>distortion>amp


thanks alot guys!


Well done. Glad it worked out for you