#1
So I have a peavey 6505+ and when I play it with my ESP MH the amp tends to make these other noises other than the string I'm playing. Is it because I'm coming in contact with the other strings even if it's the slightest contact? I'll be playing the 6th string and the other strings start making noises as well. Do you have to not touch the other strings at all to not sound like sh*t? I watch covers on YouTube and if a guy's playing the 6th string, you only hear that and it sounds so damn clean, even if he's playing lead and not on the clean channel. I'm above the beginner stage, but I'm still having this problem. This only happens on the lead channel. When I'm on clean, i just hear the string I'm playing, nothing else.

And oh, even when I get done muting all the strings and I release my hand, the amp slowly makes this high pitch sound until it gets louder and louder. What's that about as well? I don't have my gain all the way up either.
#2
Sounds like you're getting too much feedback. Does this only happen when you have the amp up loud? How close are you playing in front of the amp? Does this only happen with that guitar? Have you tried messing with the EQ?
#3
Quote by MeTallIcA313
Sounds like you're getting too much feedback. Does this only happen when you have the amp up loud? How close are you playing in front of the amp? Does this only happen with that guitar? Have you tried messing with the EQ?



I am around 15 feet away from the amp. Yes, it's mostly when I'm loud. Yes I have tried messing with some stuff to balance it all out but it's not helping.
#4
Quote by Granata
Do you have to not touch the other strings at all to not sound like sh*t?



No you need to learn to damp or mute them.

Look for lessons on palm muting and left hand muting. A combination of both will allow you to play cleanly at high volumes. It's not as difficult as it sounds once you learn the tricks.
Last edited by PSimonR at Jun 14, 2015,
#5
Eliminating the unwanted noises and strings is mostly a matter of practice and technique. I had the same problem at first. It takes time and practice to develop the ability to play only one string at a time and not get other strings to sound off. Mostly it's about being accurate..

The feedback is normal, a tube amp cranked up will do that unless you either mute the strings or cut the guitar volume. I use a volume pedal, last note of a song I automaticaly cut it to eliminate any noise between songs. I don't like unwanted noises onstage...or doodling...

I have the opposite problem, I can't get my Super Reverb to feedback even if I crank it to 10 and hold the guitar a foot from the speakers. And I want the feedback...never have figured it out, it should get feedback every time without even trying...The only way I can get feedback is to punch up the distortion or overdrive and get close to the amp, then it's not as controllable as I would like. Or plug in a hollow body...

The one thing that is not normal is if it absolutely howls and screams every time you unmute the strings. Then you probably have a microphonic pickup, your description does not sound like that's the problem. Gradually easing into feedback the way you describe is normal for a tube amp at loud volumes, you should also be able to sustain certain notes and get the same effect, and turn at certain angles to accent it. That can happen even on the clean channel at high volume levels. Most Marshalls will do it pretty easy, your 6505 should too. You may have to be closer to get the clean channel to feedback but I'd almost bet it will if you try.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Jun 14, 2015,
#6
It's haunted and in need of an exorcism.

Some good advice above. Also - a noise gate/suppressor is a 6505 amps best friend.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#7
Quote by ThunderPunk
It's haunted and in need of an exorcism.

Naaaah, then it won't sound brutal anymore.

Either way, yep, as said above, it's normal - unmuted strings do "speak" at times (there's physics involved in that which I don't know, harmonics and such, maybe someone smarter can explain), and it's barely audible when playing clean or on acoustic, but with high-gain sound it can become pretty apparent.

Muting unneeded strings is just a matter of practice, it will become natural eventually.
#9
When I play through my amp I hear a bunch of noises.


My detractors would have said I needed more practice.

Wait, they HAVE said that!