#1
I already know how to build chords and all that good stuff, but I want to learn some new tricks on adding in chords that arent in your standard ionian key. For instance, tritone substitution, augmented sixth chords, secondary dominant chords, and of similar likes. I also want to know why it works, I want to learn about new formulas to write chord progressions like Giant Steps.
#2
>ionian key
>buzzwords
>i wanna learn how to make progressions like an existing song i know the name of

something tells me you don't know anything about chords or functional harmony

sit with some sheet music, play the chords on it, learn chord voicings, reinterpret those voicings, understand how the progression works as a whole and how that is executed best with an ensemble and what your role is within that ensemble. do that a couple hundred times.

then come back and read this post and smack the shit out of yourself
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#3
You didnt answer my question at all. I am looking for new formulas to create chord progressions with chords that use notes outside the standard 7 note major scale in the same way I can use tritone substitution to substitute the V when resolving to the I. I am sure there are other tricks out there to logically employ more chords into a chord progression.
#4
The best way is to listen to music and analyze it.

Giant Steps uses modulation. It's basically just ii-V-I and V-I progressions in three different keys that are a major third apart from each other (Eb, G and B).

I would suggest analyzing songs and it helps you understand what's happening. Theory is just an analytical tool. Use it to analyze your favorite songs and figure out what's happening in them. That way you'll get new ideas. Theory on its own doesn't give you ideas, it doesn't tell you what to do.

So yeah, you'll learn those "new tricks" by listening to music that you like and analyzing it.

But how to use those "new tricks" you learn in practice? Well, you just need to use your ears. You need to internalize the sound.
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#5
I agree with MM here. If you want to learn new chords and progressions, look at tunes you like the sound of and learn from them. You need context for what you are learning, to see how it is used. I learned a lot of my voicings, progression and how to make a simple progression interesting by studying the work of Eric Johnson. That gave me concepts to work on for years.

Same when i got heavily into jazz and fusion, when i started studying the playing of players like Holdsworth, Ted Greene and Jonathan Kreisberg my knowledge of harmony grew a great deal. Recordings from great players you like is the best resource for this kind of thing there is, sit down and transcribe music that features progressions and voicings that speak to you, then analyze what you are doing so you understand the concept and can apply it to other situations and chord types. I will once again bring up the extremely common language analogy, you learn a language by imitating people who are already masters of it (your parents), then you learn to speak for yourself, then in school later on you learn that the words you speak are verbs/nouns/adjectives etc. Same process works in music, listen to someone who is a master (that you like) of the area you are trying to improve, imitate what they are doing, sit down and see why and how it works, that is how you learn the language of music regardless if you want to improve your lines, comping, rhythmic feel etc.
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#6
Coming from a background with only basic music theory, make up your own chords and experiment.
For example take a chord, change every single note except the root into something else in the same key (or different if you're feeling that way).
Or
Take a chord, change the root note and one other note.
This is how I write my music these days, I know they all have names of course, but I prefer to just make up new ones to me all over the guitar and play what works and sounds good.
#7
One thing in the OP at a time:

Ionian keys aren't a thing.

+6 chords don't exist in the kind of music you're trying to play.

Tritone substitution doesn't make anything to do with I. It works over any chord with a tritone.

Giant Steps is a 3 tonic system delineating an augmented triad. You can use the same idea to replace any diatonic progression.

But you can't just "start" throwing in the Coltrane Matrix.

What's the most complex harmony you've been writing? Give us that and we can tell you what the next level is easily.
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#8
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
You didnt answer my question at all. I am looking for new formulas to create chord progressions with chords that use notes outside the standard 7 note major scale in the same way I can use tritone substitution to substitute the V when resolving to the I. I am sure there are other tricks out there to logically employ more chords into a chord progression.

He didn't answer your question because it's clear you haven't done the basic work to understand functional harmony.

Quote by intothe
Coming from a background with only basic music theory, make up your own chords and experiment.
For example take a chord, change every single note except the root into something else in the same key (or different if you're feeling that way).
Or
Take a chord, change the root note and one other note.
This is how I write my music these days, I know they all have names of course, but I prefer to just make up new ones to me all over the guitar and play what works and sounds good.

While this "works", it sort of equivalent to throwing paint at something. Yes, sometimes what you get is interesting and provoking, but usually it's just a random amalgam of...whatever. In music, it tends to be more useful to learn the basics (which, in this thread, really means OP needs to learn functional harmony) than to just throw things together and hope it works.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jun 15, 2015,
#9
^This. And even when Pollock throws paint at a wall, he knows exactly what he's doing.

"They don't sound good because they're playing at random, they're playing at random because they sound good"
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp