#1
Hi there
Since some days I'm looking for a new guitar. I play worship, mostly alone or with a bass player.
I really liked the idea of a acoustic guitar that I can switch easily to a electric. Now as more I look in to it, it seams that all brands have stopped producing hybrid guitars (Ibanez Montage, Ovation and others)
Is the marked to dry? Is there an alternative? Hollow body and the add a piezo pickup?

What alternatives do I have. I play 80% acoustic.

Thank you so much.

Marco
#2
All brands have stopped making acoustic-electrics? I don't think that that is the case.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
Don't quite understand what you mean. There are dozens of acoustic/electric guitars on the market; all the major manufacturers including Martin, Taylor, and Gibson make such instruments.

Same with all the "standard" makers....Yamaha, Ibanez, Washburn... It would be hard to find a line that DOESN'T feature several models.
#4
I'm talking about specific called hybrid guitars, like: Imanez Montage Series MSC 380, Ovation VXT, Tayler T5, Michael Kelly Hybrid, Carvin AE185.

I'm looking for an electric guitar with a piezoelectric pickup so that you can switch between an electric guitar sound and a sound similar to an acoustic guitar with a piezoelectric pickup.
#5
Quote by alephtaph
I'm talking about specific called hybrid guitars, like: Imanez Montage Series MSC 380, Ovation VXT, Tayler T5, Michael Kelly Hybrid, Carvin AE185.

I'm looking for an electric guitar with a piezoelectric pickup so that you can switch between an electric guitar sound and a sound similar to an acoustic guitar with a piezoelectric pickup.



Crafter SA

http://www.crafterusa.com/#!product/prd14/4043618881/sa-tmvs
#7
What is your budget and what particularly are you looking for?

In my humble opinion, you've already listed one of if not the best option in this market: the Taylor T5. That's a fantastic guitar.
My God, it's full of stars!
#9
Quote by alephtaph

I really liked the idea of a acoustic guitar that I can switch easily to a electric. Now as more I look in to it, it seams that all brands have stopped producing hybrid guitars (Ibanez Montage, Ovation and others)
Is the marked to dry? Is there an alternative? Hollow body and the add a piezo pickup?
OK, the Ibanez "Montage", has been discontinued for years. AFAIK, Ovation never made an actual "hybrid", a t least not in my understanding of the term. Ovation has stopped making guitars in the US, period, hybrid or otherwise.

Quote by alephtaph
What alternatives do I have. I play 80% acoustic.

Thank you so much.

Marco
Carvin still makes a hybrid, and there's a lower price point Michael Kelly which is very similar to it. Google, " Michael Kelly hybrid". Crafter markets several models of their "SA", and SAT" guitars. I have 2 such 12 strings. BUT, 12 strings are too strident for my taste with electric, (nickel steel), string sets. So, I string them with bronze strings. That compromises the sound of the electric pickups to some degree.

Basically, one guitar won't do everything. The Carvin and Michael Kelly models are more for an electric player, wanting to work in an acoustic sound, rather than vice-verso.

The Crafter models are more acoustic. You might still be able to find a T-5 in stock or used.

Unless you're intent on bending strings and playing at the 20th fret, you could grab some type of stereo A/E guitar, (I/E Epiphone Masterbilt), and pump some dirt into the magnetic pickup line, on the second channel.

The Crafter "SAT" models are stereo, and have a humbucker at the neck position. Their "SA" models, are mono, and have a single coil front pickup.

Here's a link to one of the few dealers who stock Crafter here in the US:

(Spoiler alert, these guitars are T-5 knockoffs anyway).

http://www.adirondackguitar.com/accoustics/crafter/13/sa_arw.htm
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#10
Thank you guys, it looks that the Taylor is still one of the best options. But now I have an idea.
Thanks again.
Marco
#11
that taylor is as nice as it is pricey, haha.

One question though, it seems to only have one stereo output. How would one go about to plug the humbucker in an amp and the piezo in the mixer?

It's my favorite part about my godin a6 ultra. The humbucker goes into a dirt pedal and a blues junior and the piezo goes into the mixer. Adding a bit of delay to the acoustic side gives a really nice effect and turning on the dirt pedal really takes it beyond what you would think an acoustic guitar can do
#12
I would love to get my hands on a Godin Multiac. Unfortunately no shops around here stock them.
My God, it's full of stars!
#13
Quote by flexiblemile
that taylor is as nice as it is pricey, haha.

One question though, it seems to only have one stereo output. How would one go about to plug the humbucker in an amp and the piezo in the mixer?

It's my favorite part about my godin a6 ultra. The humbucker goes into a dirt pedal and a blues junior and the piezo goes into the mixer. Adding a bit of delay to the acoustic side gives a really nice effect and turning on the dirt pedal really takes it beyond what you would think an acoustic guitar can do
In the case of the Crafter, you have a single STEREO output jack, and it is stereo, just like the old time 1/4" stereo headphone jacks. You need a specific "Y" adapter to split the signal(s).

So, the adapter for this would be, 1/4" stereo male, into 2 - 1/4" mono females. From the guitar, (actually the output adapter), you run two standard guitar cables.

In the case of my Epiphone EJ-200-SCE, it has separate output jacks to separate the UST/Magnetic outputs. With its "Shadow" system, the prime 1/4" output mixes the 2 pickups, while a 2nd 1/4" jack, splits the output and runs the magnetic pickup only, disconnecting it from the main output jack, which is now UST only.

I can't envision a 3rd way of doing this, so Taylor probably has the stereo female output jack only.

However, neither of my stereo guitars retains an XLR output, they're 1/4" outputs only.