#1
Hi everyone, I own a schecter hellraiser c-7 fr, lately I've been listening to some bands like meshuggah which use 8-string guitars, since I don't have enough money to buy an 8 string my question is: is there a way to make a 7 string sound like an 8 string guitar? Thanks in advance
#2
Well, I guess the answer is to tune down - Meshuggah play mostly in F standard (F A# D# G# C# F# A# D#), so you could tune down that low. It is definitely doable and can sound perfectly good and play very well (especially that it's a Hellraiser which is a very solid guitar), but it will require a lot thicker strings + a proper setup. Note, however, that it will be nearly impossible to switch back and forth between F and the usual B standard or drop A.

And of course, it's also the question whether you need just the lower range, or an extended range overall - for just brvtal downtuned riffs a downtuned 7-string is perfectly fine, but an 8-string gives you a bit more range. You will lose a bit of high end if you tune down a lot, but if that's not an issue for you, there's no reason why a 7-string can't sound and play well tuned to F.

(and no, you don't need a 500" scale length for it to sound good as some people on the internets will claim, 26,5" should be ok. Tosin Abasi plays a 27" in drop E tuning and he has something like the clearest tone on the planet.)
Last edited by TheLiberation at Jun 15, 2015,
#3
One way is to eliminate the top string of the 8 and simply retune your 7-string to the bottom 7 strings of the 8.

A 7 can extend to beyond the range of a standard 8 by tuning in perfect fifths (like a violin) instead of (mostly) fourths. Or something in between.
A tuning like Bb - F - C - G - D - A - E, with the high E the same frequency as the high E on a standard tuning guitar, would actually give you a range beyond that of an 8 at the bottom end. In fact, the bottom end would be half a step below the tuning of a standard five-string bass.
#4
i read that early meshuggah used down-tuned 7's before they picked up the 8's. seems like a logical first step.
you may have to get heavy on your string gages though to deal with the loss of tension due the the relativity short (in the erg world that is) 26.5 scale. some nut slot and tuner hole modifications may be in order should you go bigger then a .060 on the A string.

on my C7+ i drop down a whole step (ADGCFAD) and run .010~0.056 with no problem but i can deal with the floppyness.

on my 27" scale RG8 i use .010~.074 tuned to EADGCFAD which is still a bit floppy. i'm currently hunting for a Agile 828 or an 830 just to get some tension back without having to go with heavies.
Last edited by ad_works at Jun 15, 2015,
#5
I used to know a guy who currently works for strandberg guitars and he was good friends with the guys in Meshuggah. I remember Frederik saying that they even considered both playing bass guitars so ever since I joked and said lead bass player and rhythm bass player depending on the situation. Like for a while my brothers band had a makeup artist to do all sorts of design; jokingly I said no say you're the lead bass player if the person asks who you are in the band.

what separates the M8 Ibanez 8 string from say a regular 7 or 6 string is the neck is 29 inches not 24 to 27 depending on the model and schecter make great guitars in my opinion for their price... copy their string gauge, material and brand. GHS and a few companies can even make you custom packs where you pick the exact gauges. Besides that F# tuning will do you some good. But besides that don't stop at the guitar copy as much of their other gear as possible. I was a big nevermore/jeff loomis fan fan and wanted a 7 string but I liked my 6s more. So it's what we can do with our gear in the end. As everyone said early stuff is a 7 string.
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Jun 15, 2015,
#6
I've always wondered why more of the low-tuned metal guys didn't tune to fifths. Sure it makes some of the reaches a bit harder, but you can usually skip strings instead of reaching for a note one string over, and you get power chords everywhere on the neck with one finger.
#7
if you hit the used section of some guitar stores you'll often find killer deals on 8's. some players get frustrated quick and sell them off. lot of rg8's, schecters, esp's and jackson's on the block now. occasionally you'll see and agile as well. thing about the agiles is (IMO) the wack paint jobs just bug me. give me black or camo and i'll be fine. what exactly is a "ghost burst" anyway?

one can find something in the $350~$450 range and maybe do a layaway....
Last edited by ad_works at Jun 15, 2015,
#8
Quote by Roc8995
I've always wondered why more of the low-tuned metal guys didn't tune to fifths. Sure it makes some of the reaches a bit harder, but you can usually skip strings instead of reaching for a note one string over, and you get power chords everywhere on the neck with one finger.


I've done this with the Variax using its pitch replacement alternative tuning setup.

As you say, it takes a bit to get used to it, but it works pretty well and extends the range of the guitar (and the Variax is just a six string) significantly.
#9
Thank you all for the answers, i think i'll try to downtune my guitar while checking the stores if i see some 8 strings at good prices. I heard agile guitars are good but i also heard that in my country (italy) it can be a problem to get one so I was thinking about an Ibanez or another schecter
#10
Quote by ciurga
Thank you all for the answers, i think i'll try to downtune my guitar while checking the stores if i see some 8 strings at good prices. I heard agile guitars are good but i also heard that in my country (italy) it can be a problem to get one so I was thinking about an Ibanez or another schecter


Those latter brands seem to be everywhere, and since you already have a Schecter, you know what they're about. Here in the US, the Agile is a great value, and if you've got the money to go upscale there are several options beyond the usual Ibanez and Schecter choices.

I'm currently considering a Carvin Vader V8. It's a headless guitar (one of the issues with 8's is that collection of metal and headstock wood out at the end of the neck that can make those guitars neck-heavy), available with a 20" radius fretboard, either 27" or 25.5" scales, and with choices like ebony fretboard (standard), stainless, standard or EVO frets, neck-through construction (standard, again), and with a whole ton of wood and finish options. But these start at around $1299 (8-string versions) and move up from there, depending on the options you tack on...http://www.carvinguitars.com/catalog/guitars/v8



What's cool: the standard guitar with a 27" scale neck, 24 frets and a streaky ebony fretboard (I love those streaks!) weighs in at just 6.4 lbs and is only 31.5" long. If you stand it up, it has two strap buttons on the bottom of the guitar; much harder to knock over, and if you do, you're not going to break a headstock. If you want it lighter, you order it with one of the optional top woods, and you can have the guitar chambered. Woo!
Last edited by dspellman at Jun 16, 2015,