#1
I have really been struggling with trying to figure out which position has more advantages than the other: the normal position or the classical position? I know it's preference, but I can't find comfort in both, so i'll just go along with the one that's more beneficial in the long run.

Ok, with that said, I need some advice. I've experimented with holding my guitar for quite a while now, and I really can't find a comfortable position. Sometimes holding it in a classical position and have the neck slanted up a little can help me get down frets faster, but when I do chords I tend to touch the side of the neck, causing my index finger to be slanted and touch other strings. Then in normal position it's great for chord switching, but sort of awful for going up and down the neck in my experience, etc. As you can see, I really can't find a comfort spot. My question is if there is any advantages to holding a guitar in the classical position as opposed to the normal position? Vice versa. Once I get better i'm aiming to play thrash metal, but I really don't want to develop a bad technique.

And oh, I sort of asked a similar question before, but should you avoid touching the side of the guitar neck with your fretting hand'a palm? I hear that you should keep your wrist down and curl your fingers, but for some riffs it's really hard to go fast in that position while avoiding touching the neck. I watched Justin Guitar a lot back then, and that's what I was always told, but he says that later on when you're better you can touch it for more advanced purposes. Why is it bad to touch the side with your palm as opposed to keeping your wrist completely down and your fingers curled 24/7? And are there any techniques that benefit from touching the neck with your palm to let's say get your fingers up to the 5th string for a riff? I find touching neck easier for someone who wants to go up and down the neck at a fast tempo (shredding) as opposed to having your wrist down and hands curled, which doesn't allow for fast shredding in my experience.
#2
When I sit and play my guiatr I use the strap and when I stand up the guiatr is in the same place.ALSO WHEN U USE THE STRAP you can play better
#3
Quote by Tazz3
When I sit and play my guiatr I use the strap and when I stand up the guiatr is in the same place.ALSO WHEN U USE THE STRAP you can play better

Thanks for the advice, but still need advice on other things I wrote.
#4
What the hell are you talking about? Just do whatever you want. Nothing is "bad" or "good". It's all what are you comfortable with and best at. I'm still baffled by the stuff you're asking...
#5
Quote by PiercedBand
What the hell are you talking about? Just do whatever you want. Nothing is "bad" or "good". It's all what are you comfortable with and best at. I'm still baffled by the stuff you're asking...


Some advice, dude. If t bothers you, don't post in my threads.
Last edited by Granata at Jun 16, 2015,
#6
You worry to much about doing everything "by the book". I also don't understand what you're even asking about this touching the side of the neck thing. Reading this post hurts my brain.
I'll just quickly give a little summary of my thoughts on what I understand here:

The classical position is essentially superior to any other way of holding the guitar. At the end of the day though being comfortable with how you hold the guitar is what matters.

I don't understand this touching the neck shit you're on about..
Generally you wrap your thumb over the neck when you need more control (generally with big bends etc). For chords (especially difficult ones) you want your thumb much further down the neck. Personally, I have played long enough that my thumb knows where it should be on the back of the neck for whatever given piece of music I'm playing. I've learned how to do this by playing long enough and experimenting with different thumb positions over time.

You obsess over "shredding" a lot, and whilst I'm not an advocate of giving advice on this topic (it seems so stupid to me) I find that for me personally when I am playing a faster passage generally my thumb finds that medium between being wrapped over the neck and further down the neck.

I'll attach a few images of different ways I position my thumb. Keep in mind this is personal preference:

Playing fast passages my thumb typically creeps over the top of the neck a bit. This particular passage my fingers aren't doing any crazy stretches so I don't need it right behind the neck, but I'm also making a lot of fast switches so I like the control my thumb gives.



Playing chords my thumb will be right behind the neck, generally in the centre. This is because it gives my fingers more freedom over the neck. They aren't restricted because of my thumb arching over the top



Finally, my thumb is arched way over the top when I need maximum control over the bend I'm doing in this section. It's never this extreme a case, but this particular section was an exception. I don't need any freedom over my other fingers because it's just my ring finger on the fret and the other 4 fingers are there to provide support and control over the bend.

Last edited by vayne92 at Jun 16, 2015,
#7
Quote by vayne92
You worry to much about doing everything "by the book". I also don't understand what you're even asking about this touching the side of the neck thing. Reading this post hurts my brain.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&persist_app=1&v=yh6sPqDEZCY

6:37

Should you avoid touching it at all times or is there times when you basically have to touch it In order to play a riff, chord, etc?
Last edited by Granata at Jun 16, 2015,
#8
Quote by vayne92


I'll attach a few images of different ways I position my thumb. Keep in mind this is personal preference:

Playing fast passages my thumb typically creeps over the top of the neck a bit. This particular passage my fingers aren't doing any crazy stretches so I don't need it right behind the neck, but I'm also making a lot of fast switches so I like the control my thumb gives.





Dude what model Avenger is that? Shit's sweet.

Also, OP: Again, like I've been saying in all of your threads, you are too concerned about having someone else tell you the "right way" to do things. Just play the damn guitar.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#9
Quote by Granata


Should you avoid touching it at all times or is there times when you basically have to touch it In order to play a riff, chord, etc?


Do it however it feels comfortable to you. That is the correct answer.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#10
Quote by the_bi99man
Dude what model Avenger is that? Shit's sweet.


Haha cheers man. It's actually a Schecter Synyster Special. I believe it's a discontinued model. I was a big fan of Synyster Gates in my early days but his other signature models are atrocious and as far as signature models go this one is very subtle. I bought this guitar when I got my first ever paycheck. Very special guitar to me. Plays so nice, but it's a heavy ****er.

http://www.proaudioland.com/news/schecter-synyster-gates-special-electric-guitar-review/
#11
Quote by vayne92
Haha cheers man. It's actually a Schecter Synyster Special. I believe it's a discontinued model. I was a big fan of Synyster Gates in my early days but his other signature models are atrocious and as far as signature models go this one is very subtle. I bought this guitar when I got my first ever paycheck. Very special guitar to me. Plays so nice, but it's a heavy ****er.

http://www.proaudioland.com/news/schecter-synyster-gates-special-electric-guitar-review/


Ah nice. I suspected a Syn model because of the headstock, but yeah, none of the pinstripes or ridiculously over the top inlays. Very nice. I like that headstock on the Avenger, but the flashiness of the models throws me off, too. I want one of the new Blackjack Avengers. Holy shit, THAT headstock. Brutal.

Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#12
Quote by Granata
https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&persist_app=1&v=yh6sPqDEZCY

6:37

Should you avoid touching it at all times or is there times when you basically have to touch it In order to play a riff, chord, etc?


Oh I see what you're saying. Yeah this is a very common issue beginners have, and he does specifically say this is for beginners.
Generally the further your thumb is arched over the neck the easier it is for your first finger to accidentally touch the high e and mute the string.

This is only relevant for chords by the way. Chords where the high e is played open to be specific. This is another case of you doing things "by the book". I understand the need to nit-pick every little detail when you're a beginner, but I think you're going a little overboard
#13
Quote by the_bi99man
Ah nice. I suspected a Syn model because of the headstock, but yeah, none of the pinstripes or ridiculously over the top inlays. Very nice. I like that headstock on the Avenger, but the flashiness of the models throws me off, too. I want one of the new Blackjack Avengers. Holy shit, THAT headstock. Brutal.



Yeah, these new models I've seen coming out are really nice. It's so similar to my Schecter, however, so there's no reason for me to buy the "same" guitar. My next guitar on the agenda is a Sterling JP60. Had to sell mine when I went overseas unfortunately, but I'll definitely be buying another when my financial situation is more suitable.

EDIT: This is a very accurate "review" on the Synyster Special. My thoughts exactly.

"While the previous Synyster Signature was a self-indulgent mess filled with more skull-bats and A7x insignia than anyone who wasn’t named Synyster would care to look at, this updated model gets it right"
Last edited by vayne92 at Jun 16, 2015,
#14
Quote by vayne92
Oh I see what you're saying. Yeah this is a very common issue beginners have, and he does specifically say this is for beginners.
Generally the further your thumb is arched over the neck the easier it is for your first finger to accidentally touch the high e and mute the string.

This is only relevant for chords by the way. Chords where the high e is played open to be specific. This is another case of you doing things "by the book". I understand the need to nit-pick every little detail when you're a beginner, but I think you're going a little overboard


I don't want to get a bad habit that will mess up some playing later on in other techniques. So avoid touching it when playing chords only? Do professionals usually touch it to get their fingers over the 4th string to play a riff? Cause I can't do that without touching that damn bottom side of the neck.
#15
I think sometimes you may have to get into the technique, get a feel for it and then refine it.
If you are afraid of picking up habits right from the start then it may slow your progress.

Great that you are analysing things though!