#1
| - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0-1-3
| - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0-1-3
| - - - - - - - - - - - - - -0-2
| - - - - - - - - - 0-2-3
| - - - - 0-2-3
| 0-1-3
Can someone please explain to me what this is in relation to the c major scale? I saw a lesson on the 7 positions ( Lydian and all the others) and got confused. How is the scale I tabbed out different from the positions? Is what I posted a mode or something?
#3
^There is no answer more right than this. Forget about modes for now.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
Quote by InsaneVendetta
| - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0-1-3
| - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 0-1-3
| - - - - - - - - - - - - - -0-2
| - - - - - - - - - 0-2-3
| - - - - 0-2-3
| 0-1-3
Can someone please explain to me what this is in relation to the c major scale? I saw a lesson on the 7 positions ( Lydian and all the others) and got confused. How is the scale I tabbed out different from the positions? Is what I posted a mode or something?
The "root" note, or "tonic", (C), falls here:

e-6 x
B-2 1 ("middle C", or "C4")
G-3 x
D-4 x
A -5 3 ( C3)
E.-6 x
The other notes above and below the 2 C notes, just extend the scale into a higher or lower octave..

As for modes, theoretically if you play D to d using the notes from C major, you would be playing, "D Dorian".

Modes do not harmonize the same as the C major scale, are mostly only found in Gregorian chants, and will just clutter up your head with virtually useless information.

So yeah, as has been said, ignore modes.
#6
Quote by Captaincranky


Modes do not harmonize the same as the C major scale, are mostly only found in Gregorian chants, and will just clutter up your head with virtually useless information.

So yeah, as has been said, ignore modes.


are you 'avin a god damn giggle m8
ayy lmao
#7
If you're starting out, I wouldn't worry about all the positions of a scale.

The pitches in a scale are going to occur all over the neck ... typically players group them together for ease of mechanically playing them ... either strictly using 3 notes per string, or using regions (like your example, where roughly 4 frets are covered), or traversing horizontally along one or two strings. Regions break 12 frets of the neck into 5 areas, based on how octaves occur.

Depending how you use the notes, you can either make the song sound like its based on that scale, and centred around the start note of that scale (e.g. centred around C, using the major scale), or you can destroy that effect (e.g. with the notes of C major, play C once and D 50 times in a row). But this is more advanced (this is the concept of "establishing a tonality").

I very strongly suggest you learn scales by learning intervals first ... these can be learned as visual shapes, and recognised aurally. This lesson may help you: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_2.html

As and when you get into positional playing, it's a very good idea to have first mastered the interval shapes for the octave.

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jun 17, 2015,
#9
If it has notes C D E F G A and B in it, it is the C major scale (it can also be some other scale, for example A minor, but that has a lot to do with what you are playing over). It doesn't matter what position you are playing in or what the lowest note of the position is. The scale is all over the fretboard, not just in one position. Positions are just an easier way to memorize scales - I mean, that way you don't need to memorize the whole fretboard at once.

If the chords you are playing over are in the key of C major and you use the notes in that position, you are using the C major scale.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
I'm not an expert but I'd say this is the E-Phrygian mode. It's basically The C Major scale but you start with the E.

Don't know if this is important. I like it a lot though. It sounds very mystical to me. Fits very good into metal with heavy palm muting and big drums.

You hear the best effect if you play around on the E, A and D string with those tabs.
#11
^ It is only E phrygian if you are playing it over an E phrygian backing track, or playing a phrygian melody without a backing track. What makes a melody phrygian? Well, that's another question, and you need to use your ears for that. But I wouldn't worry about modes yet.

The lowest note of the position doesn't matter. How you use the notes does. The most important thing is what you are playing over. If the backing track is in C major, it is the C major scale. If there is no backing track, then we need to listen to it and determine the tonic.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
Quote by Ougagagoubu
I'm not an expert but I'd say this is the E-Phrygian mode. It's basically The C Major scale but you start with the E.

Don't know if this is important. I like it a lot though. It sounds very mystical to me. Fits very good into metal with heavy palm muting and big drums.

You hear the best effect if you play around on the E, A and D string with those tabs.
You can pretty much make anything sound "mystical", if you harp on Em and Am all night, and bounce around on the bottom 3 strings. Oh hell, just take the top 3 off altogether.

Better yet, sharp the G. Then you'll have a Phrygian dominant scale
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 18, 2015,
#13
What Maggara said. It's not modal unless it's modal
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#14
but is it a moral modal?
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#15
No, music is inherently amoral.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#16
Quote by Ougagagoubu
I'm not an expert but I'd say this is the E-Phrygian mode. It's basically The C Major scale but you start with the E.

Don't know if this is important. I like it a lot though. It sounds very mystical to me. Fits very good into metal with heavy palm muting and big drums.

You hear the best effect if you play around on the E, A and D string with those tabs.


Modality is a harmonic concept, not a scalar one. Without any harmonic context, there's no reason to assume it's anything other than a normal major scale, especially since the question was asked in reference to C major.
#17
Hi everyone,

Sorry for rebooting this thread but I am curious because I think I am on this topic as far as theory is concern. It seems to me that the question is about chord construction? Currently, I am getting buried understanding harmonic intervals especially understanding interval quality and interval names.

I have understood the circle of fifths quite well, but before I can get to chord constructions, I am stuck at intervals. I am sure I figure it out sooner or later but I like to know if I am on the right track and is it the fundamental basis to chord construction which I must know intimately?

Please advice.
Last edited by stkhoo at Jun 26, 2015,
#18
This stuff ought to get you started on intervals:
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/30
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/31
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/32
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/33

Make sure you use the site's popout piano interface (click in the upper right corner) to sort of play along and hear the ideas being taught in the lesson. If you play along for yourself, you can hear what they're talking about for yourself.
#19
Thanks for the links...appreciate it. Hopefully I will be able to dig myself out of the hole soon.