#1
Hi,
I've been playing guitar for a while now and bought a new ZOOM G3X Link . I'm a complete NOOD at processors and sound. All i had till now was an amp with an inbuilt distortion switch. That's it. I have a couple of questions regarding how to use it and regarding sound:

1. What is amp modelling? Why are amps mixed with effects? My idea of a processor was selecting effects and connecting it to an amp for the sound. How do I use, for example, a distortion pedal, reverb pedal and wah with a Fender Twin reverb? All these effects are there in the processor but when I switch to them on certain screens, i get a [Cable->THRU] sign. What does this mean? Do i have to arrange the effects in a certain order with the amp? How do i do it and on what screens do i put them?

2. Should I not use an amp effect at all? Should i just use effects, switch them on and off when required and listen to them directly on my sterio headphones which is my output device? What's the difference?

3. What are the best overall settings for a fender Twin reverb amp for a blues rock sound? Philip Sayce . Also, could anyone roughly tell me what pedals to use for this sound?

4. What would be a good amp and pedal combination for a decent Metal sound over which i can lead and solo?

I use a korean made strat ripoff and connect my headphones directly to the pedal. Any help is appreciated.
#2
The reason why amps are mixed with FX is because you can assign either to any slot. You don't need to use an amp model with your amp but you can. If you are using headphones then it's typically best to use an amp model. Amp models are to simulate different kinds of amps. Something you can't do with your single amp. Amp modeling is really not much different than a distortion stomp except the amp model includes the speaker simulation, which is typically used to filter a lot of the harshness from the sound and shape the tone. You select different speaker simulations with an amp model. You can also shape the tone by selecting the output option in the global menu.

The reality is that when it comes to processors there is a bit of hand waving when it comes to what a speaker simulation and output option really amounts to. It's just something the designers thought sounded good, and not a specific hard rule of simulation. The user is really required to use his ear and experiment. That's why many people find getting the right tone from a multifx to be frustrating.

The bottom line is that the amp model is to simulate an amp, the cabinet model is to simulate a cabinet, and the output option is to shape the sound depending on what the actual amp is (i.e. combo, stack, direct for PA). But I find the output option is really just a suggestion and it's better to select what you like. Even if you are feeding a guitar amp you still might want to sound like a different amp, hence the amp model. But you can make your amp sound like a different amp with a distortion stomp too.
#3
You should read the G3X's manual, Shreyeder.

If you already have a good physical amp, amp simulations often don't do much besides make everything sound bad.

Amp sims in effects loops can work but there is not much point unless you have a really bad amp. And a really bad amp will probably make anything sound bad as well.

With headphones, you might want amp sims. The G3/G3X amp sims are okay but I wouldn't use them live. You have to be very particular about how you have the sims set. Generally, with physical and digital amps, you run distortion and compressors in the front of the amp (the input). On the G3 that means you just have the distortion and comps before the amp in the chain. Then you run delays, reverbs, etc. in the amp's effects loop. In the G3's case, you would put these after the amp sim.

You also might be overloading the DSP of the G3X. The unit does not have enough processing power to do 2 amp sims at the same time I don't think, or the HD reverb with a lot. The Cable-Thru sign means that the effects slot (1-6) is bypassed, nothing is there.

For a Fender amp sim to have a blues-rock sound, set the gain low (maybe 5 or 10) and put the volume at listening levels. Keep the EQ on the amp sim flat. Add the graphic EQ after the amp, and put the overdrive before it. Put a reverb after the EQ, the hall is fine.

Overdrive> Fender Amp sim> EQ> Reverb

Set the overdrive so that it just barely hits the amp harder. Put the level of the OD up, keep the gain low. On the EQ, boost 800hz and 3.9khz a bit. Adjust reverb to taste.
#4
Hi! I think your answer addresses most of my issues. A few quick doubts.
1. Aren't distortion, delay, chorus,flager,reverb and ALL effect pedals? So should't all of them be run before the amp sim? Wouldn't this phyisically translate to me having plugged in my guitar to a pedal board and the pedal board to the amp? Essentially, shouldn't all effects be before the amp? Say i want distortion,wah,reverb,octaver,noise gate all with a fender twin reverb. What would the config of the 6 screens be?

2. What do you mean by 'nothing there' in the bypass. When you say bypass, you mean only the amp sim is running? Also, what do you mean by 'run them in the amp's effect loop'? I just need the order and press the stomp buttons to switch the effects on and off no?
Last edited by Shreyeder at Jun 17, 2015,
#5
^ No, not all effects should be in front of your amp (or that's your choice, but certain effects sound better in the FX loop). Modulation (chorus, flanger, phaser, tremolo) and time based effects (delay, reverb) usually sound better after the amp (in the FX loop), and distortion, wah and pitch shifter in front of the amp. In real life all pedals in a pedal board are not always in front of the amp. Some of them may be in FX loop (though some amps don't have one). Effects in the FX loop are usually placed after the pre amp.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
I dare say that literally every one of your questions could be answered by 10 minutes with the manual.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#7
Quote by MaggaraMarine
^ No, not all effects should be in front of your amp (or that's your choice, but certain effects sound better in the FX loop). Modulation (chorus, flanger, phaser, tremolo) and time based effects (delay, reverb) usually sound better after the amp (in the FX loop), and distortion, wah and pitch shifter in front of the amp. In real life all pedals in a pedal board are not always in front of the amp. Some of them may be in FX loop (though some amps don't have one). Effects in the FX loop are usually placed after the pre amp.


Ok thanks. Got it. One final question. I'm using the overdrive effect with the fender twin reverb amp model. How much gain do i put on the amp? Don't the gain from the amp and the gain on the pedal interfere with each other?
#8
Quote by Shreyeder
Ok thanks. Got it. One final question. I'm using the overdrive effect with the fender twin reverb amp model. How much gain do i put on the amp? Don't the gain from the amp and the gain on the pedal interfere with each other?

I would say experiment. Amp gain and pedal gain sound a bit different. Both do achieve the same thing (more distortion).

A common thing to do with real amps is to use an OD pedal as a boost. Use little pedal gain and turn the pedal volume all the way up. That way the OD pedal only boosts the input volume and doesn't add clipping on its own. This boosts the amp gain. It has a similar effect as using higher output pickups. But I don't know how this works with modeling stuff. Experiment.

But yeah, the pedal volume also has an effect on how distorted your sound is (if your amp is already distorted - otherwise it will add volume).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115