#1
I have an affinity strat and I want to get a new warmoth neck with stainless steel frets (due to their hardness, they wear out much slower than regular frets.) But I also want to buy an epiphone les paul 100 and make it look like a les paul custom. I've really wanted a les paul for a while now but I also want frets that will take really long to wear out on my stat. So which do you guys think I should get?
#2
Unless you have a nickel allergy, leave the frets alone. Trust me, they are not going to wear out and upgrading the neck on an Affinity isn't worth it.

I'm curious, what would you do to make a Les Paul 100 look like a Custom?

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#3
Just a newbie here but I will tell you what I read. Stainless steel frets produce a sharper brighter tone. So I assume it will not sound the same.
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#4
Pick out a nicer guitar. The Affinity is a decent 1st axe but putting a bunch of $$ into one doesn't make good sense.

I have been gigging for 40 years and have not completely worn out a neck yet. They last a very long time.
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Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jun 21, 2015,
#5
Quote by jthm_guitarist
Unless you have a nickel allergy, leave the frets alone. Trust me, they are not going to wear out and upgrading the neck on an Affinity isn't worth it.

I'm curious, what would you do to make a Les Paul 100 look like a Custom?

Install trapezoid fret inlay decals, install chrome humbucker covers, gold knobs, and a white pickguard if it doesn't already come with it.
#6
Quote by w.coronado99
Install trapezoid fret inlay decals, install chrome humbucker covers, gold knobs, and a white pickguard if it doesn't already come with it.


LP Customs don't have trapezoid inlays, they've got (rectangular) block inlays...
#7
Why would you ever want to make an Epiphone LP100 look like an LP Custom. That's a terrible idea.

Or better yet, why would anyone want an LP100 in the first place? They're nothing more than a glorified LP Special II. An ungamely, generally poorly made and poorly featured plank that people buy, play halfheartedly for about a month, and once they realize that learning how to play guitar takes time and dedication, they throw their Special II plank into the closet to be completely forgotten about. The LP100 is no exception.

The LP100 and LP Custom are structurally different guitars, not just aesthetically different. One has a set (glued-in) neck, and the other is a bolt-on. One has multi-layer binding all over the headstock, the neck and the body (on both sides) One has block inlays, the other has dots. One has a large diamond inlay on the headstock and the other doesn't.

The amount of effort and money it would cost (for things like materials, tools and other hidden costs) to make an LP 100 look anything like an LP Custom makes doing so really, really pointless.

. Fully binding a guitar to create the look of an LP Custom is very difficult and super easy to **** up, and repairing any damage from routing binding channels out is often a nightmare. Installing binding onto a neck requires refretting the entire guitar.

. Routing out inlays is very difficult. Again, very easy to **** up. Repairs are often very difficult to do. Radiusing the inlays after they're been installed (which is required because no electric guitar has a flat fretboard) is pretty much impossible without refretting the entire guitar.

. Converting a bolt-on neck to a set neck is flat-out a dumb idea.

. Refinishing the entire guitar after all your work is done (which is required) is an enormous job that is extremely easy to mess up. And rectifying any issues often requires stripping all the finish off that you just applied and starting all over again. It is without a doubt, the most frustrating stage of any guitar build.

If you want to do any of this stuff to a decent standard and not to a god awful-looking bodge job, all of the above will apply to you.

I think you should really look into what's actually required in doing the modifications you're considering. Before you even think about applying them to the guitar you wish to mod. Weigh the effort and the costs against how much it would cost in getting an actual LP Custom. I think you'll find that getting an Epiphone LP Custom is going to cost hundreds of dollars less, and you'll end up with a far better result anyway.

Forget about modding an LP100. You have no idea what you're getting yourself into. Terrible, terrible idea.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jun 21, 2015,
#8
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Just a newbie here but I will tell you what I read. Stainless steel frets produce a sharper brighter tone. So I assume it will not sound the same.


I actually own several guitars with stainless frets and have for years. I also own versions of the same guitars with standard frets. Near as I can tell, there's almost no tonal difference.
#9
Condensing the consensus thus far: don't bother with the new neck yet, and don't buy an axe for that modding plan- buy the best guitar you can afford & let it be.
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#10
Quote by w.coronado99
I have an affinity strat and I want to get a new warmoth neck with stainless steel frets (due to their hardness, they wear out much slower than regular frets.) But I also want to buy an epiphone les paul 100 and make it look like a les paul custom. I've really wanted a les paul for a while now but I also want frets that will take really long to wear out on my stat. So which do you guys think I should get?


Mostly money ill-spent.

It's a bit like bolting horns onto a pig and calling it a deer.

You're not going to wear out the existing frets any time soon. By the time you do (and probably before you do), you're going to want a whole different guitar.

You need to know that a Warmoth neck arrives with frets, but those frets still need fretwork. They're simply installed (pressed in). Not leveled, not crowned, not polished. You'll spend money with a tech getting all of that done (and probably getting the neck installed as well; you don't simply unscrew one neck and screw in another. You'll just be back on the internet forums asking, "Did I completely screw up my guitar here?" and paying double to fix what you screwed up).

The other issue is that after you "upgrade" with the Warmoth neck, it's more than likely you'll never get that money back; the guitar will be resold as an Affinity and the money you've put into the neck will be lost.

My suggestion is that you NOT buy an Epiphone and try to dress it up like a Custom. You're better off to save up a bit more and buy an Epiphone that already looks like a Custom, or buy an Agile AL 3XXX series that comes with real MOP inlays, triple binding, ebony fretboard, etc. Not only do you get a guitar that looks the way you want it to look, but one that will play and sound better as well.
#11
Quote by dspellman
Mostly money ill-spent.

It's a bit like bolting horns onto a pig and calling it a deer.

You're not going to wear out the existing frets any time soon. By the time you do (and probably before you do), you're going to want a whole different guitar.

You need to know that a Warmoth neck arrives with frets, but those frets still need fretwork. They're simply installed (pressed in). Not leveled, not crowned, not polished. You'll spend money with a tech getting all of that done (and probably getting the neck installed as well; you don't simply unscrew one neck and screw in another. You'll just be back on the internet forums asking, "Did I completely screw up my guitar here?" and paying double to fix what you screwed up).

The other issue is that after you "upgrade" with the Warmoth neck, it's more than likely you'll never get that money back; the guitar will be resold as an Affinity and the money you've put into the neck will be lost.

My suggestion is that you NOT buy an Epiphone and try to dress it up like a Custom. You're better off to save up a bit more and buy an Epiphone that already looks like a Custom, or buy an Agile AL 3XXX series that comes with real MOP inlays, triple binding, ebony fretboard, etc. Not only do you get a guitar that looks the way you want it to look, but one that will play and sound better as well.


well there goes my Pig modding plan right out the window

agree with others that this is an all around bad idea. a new neck like that will cost more than the guitar you are putting it on. not worth it. modding a bottom of the barrel epi is also a complete waste of time and money for what you want to do. WHY... wwhat possessed yuou to think that was a good plan? for about $350 you can buy an Epi LP custom used. better to just buy one. even if you got the look you wouldn't have the sound or the feel, both of which are far more important.