#1
Hi,

I am in need of some help with buying a new guitar.


Since I am very happy with my current electric guitar, I am looking for an acoustic (it does not matter if it has a pre amp or not).

My budget is roughly 2000 dollars and the main selling points I am looking for (apart from sound, of course) is the looks of the guitar and it having a mid sized body (grand auditorium kinda).

My main way of playing is picking, but I like to mix it in with some chords etc. so a guitar that puts emphasis on picking sound instead of bassy sound would fit me very well.


I have been looking at the Faith Eclipse Venus and the Taylor 214ce and both seem to be pretty good and fit within my budget.


I am planning on going to my local guitar store to try out some models but having a firm structure on what I am looking for would help me a lot.

Thanks beforehand!
#2
Where are you calling from? The reason I ask is, Faith is generally not a US brand. Whereas Taylor moves as many, or more, units a year here in the US than C.F.Martin.

If Faith is a brand distributed "down under", perhaps Tony Done can fill in the blanks better than me.

Both of the guitars you're considering are, (approximately), "mini jumbos". Neither one would be particularly, "boomy", or bass heavy. Leave that chore to dreadnoughts.

The Taylor is laminate B & S. The Faith is all solid. I'm curious as to whether the Faith is painted all black to hide the fact appearance grade mahogany is getting harder and harder to find. Don't know as that would have much effect on tone though.

I like the Taylor's paint job way better. (Dunno know if that matters to you).

This article provides a comprehensive look at the Faith's, "Shadow", electronics. http://www.acousticguitar.com/Gear/Reviews/Shadow-Nanoflex-6-SH-4020-Review Shadow stereo electronics now appear in Epiphone's high end products, but in a more standard double pickup system. (Piezo UST, and a magnetic pickup at the end of the fret board).

The Taylor's "layered" sides and back are rosewood, with a poplar core. And while laminates generally don't retain ALL of the sonic qualities of the parent facing woods, they do retain some of them. Hence there could be a small, "rosewood vs. mahogany", controversy here, to those who might welcome it.

Considering both guitars have bolt on necks, whether or not that's a plus in favor of either guitar, is pretty much going to depend on which company has the better, (or more widespread), authorized service facilities in your location.
#3
+1 on all that CC wrote, I can't think of anything to add that doesn't reflect my personal biases. I haven't seen the Faith models here in Oz, so can't offer specifics. The Patrick Eggles name carries a lot of mojo, but I have no idea how this relates to the Asian-made models.
#4
Well I am currently living in Sweden, which makes ordering from Europe very easy. Thanks for everything you wrote, will definitely take a look at the article you linked
#5
Quote by jakobjump
Well I am currently living in Sweden, which makes ordering from Europe very easy. Thanks for everything you wrote, will definitely take a look at the article you linked

I don't know what the prices in sweden are.
But in most of europe you should be able to buy a 400 series taylor
for around 2000 euro's. Or a nice OM Martin.
Guitar Newbie
#6
Hello

I bought my Taylor 114CE for about USD870. A Taylor 214CE would be around USD970 there abouts. The main difference between the Taylor 114CE and the Taylor 214CE is that the laminated sides and back the former is Sepele with matt finish while the later is Rosewood with gloss finished.

In terms of tonal difference is that the 114CE is slightly brighter while the 214CE is slightly warmer...truth is unless you are really paying attention especially on the open strings 1,2 and 3 do you hear the difference. Sustain is quite decent for a laminate. I twanged a little on a 314CE which has solid sides and back....again unless you are really paying attention do you hear the difference is sustain.

Do note one silly issue with Taylor CEs....They are active pickups that requires battery and because the casing are constructed in such a way it only accommodates Duracells....If you happened to purchase different brands of battery, you may have to cut off the tab on the battery holder or it will not fit properly.

While I don't know what currency exactly are you dealing with and if it is Euros, 2000 is a lot to pay for a Taylor 214CE. At the end of the day, you have to decide, do you really want to pay so much for an acoustic guitar off the bat or would you like start off with a decent one like the 214CE and move up later when you are more certain which tonal or sustain differences you like.
Last edited by stkhoo at Jun 24, 2015,
#7
PS: On a personal note, I do find that the string action of the Taylor a little high from the saddle end. Compared to the Yamaha FG720SL of which, the string action from the saddle end is lower. Personally this does have an impact when it comes to how close I have to press onto the fret wire. My Taylor is less forgiving as oppose to my Yamaha.
#8
^^^^^ Your Taylor just needs a set up. Many (most?) guitars do when you buy the them, because personal preferences vary. A lot of us have learned to do it ourselves.

I'm surprised about the battery. They are supposed to be standard, and I've never encountered any significant variation.
#9
Check out Crafter guitars. Widely available in Europe, good range of models, excellent quality, reasonable prices (your $2000 will get you a very good one), very playable. In fact very similar to Taylor guitars in sound, style, quality and playability but 1/2 to 1/3 of the price, spec for spec. Win, win, win.
#10
Hi Tony

My Taylor was setup upon purchased. I wanted to adjust the saddle however, I was personally pretty uneasy about it because my guitar is a lefty and if the saddle is somewhat screwed up, I will not be able to purchase a lefty saddle as they have to be ordered in of which I did so currently waiting for my spare saddle to arrive.

The store that I purchased from happens to be the official distributor of Taylor guitar and the store manager adviced me not to sand down the saddle as it may affect the tone of the pickups. His opinion, which he claims its also Taylor's advice is to remove the neck (as all Taylor necks are removable) and adjust action height by the shims? I am not too comfortable with that notion as yet.

As far as doing this kind of work myself, I don't think I am technically capable of doing it on my own as yet. I am not the most careful of people for this sort of stuff and most likely I will screw it up.

Yup....I bought a Panasonic battery...the rectangular type...well it would not fit...it was wedge so tight that I almost could not remove the battery from the holder. I brought it back and the store manager told me to get Duracell batteries or cut off the center piece of plastic where the contact points are.
#11
^^^^^^ Yes, it's a good idea to have a spare saddle on hand if you plan on modding the original one.

I would get a second opinion on lowering the saddle. My mate sells Taylors, so I'll ask him about shimming versus saddle lowering when next I see him.. My feeling is that the increments available from shims might be too coarse for fine-tuning action height, but you never know. I don't think it is a very daring operation on Taylors if you have the right wrenches and shims.

I'll also have a closer look at those battery dimensions. - The same problem might turn up elsewhere, so it is worth keeping in mind.
#12
Quote by stkhoo
Hi Tony

My Taylor was setup upon purchased. I wanted to adjust the saddle however, I was personally pretty uneasy about it because my guitar is a lefty and if the saddle is somewhat screwed up, I will not be able to purchase a lefty saddle as they have to be ordered in of which I did so currently waiting for my spare saddle to arrive.
Yeah, being a lefty sucks, except when somebody wants to borrow your guitar...

Quote by stkhoo
The store that I purchased from happens to be the official distributor of Taylor guitar and the store manager adviced me not to sand down the saddle as it may affect the tone of the pickups. His opinion, which he claims its also Taylor's advice is to remove the neck (as all Taylor necks are removable) and adjust action height by the shims? I am not too comfortable with that notion as yet.
OK, if your strings are too high on one side, (say the bass side), you're never going to adjust that via shimming. Neck shims adjust all strings the same, and all at the same time. So, I can easily envision a sand the saddle, and/ or replace the shims operation, happening at the same time, or separately.

Quote by stkhoo
As far as doing this kind of work myself, I don't think I am technically capable of doing it on my own as yet. I am not the most careful of people for this sort of stuff and most likely I will screw it up.
We're going to point you at this: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html By the time you read that 3 or 4 times, it should have given you a big boost in confidence. But remember, the tutorial is about set neck guitars. So any major change in string height, is going to be done with shims.

On another note, your 114ce should have the "Expression"(1) pickups. These aren't piezo, and AFAIK, they don't interfere with, and aren't under the saddle itself anyway.

The new, "Expression 2", is inside the bridge, but not underneath the saddle. It's behind the saddle. OK, that's is what I was able to glean from the Taylor website. I haven't taken a Taylor apart. (As of yet)...

I'm not certain the "2" system is available on the 2xx series, or if so, it might only be on the deluxe models.

I just took delivery of a brand new 115ce (left handed) 12 string. It has the standard expression system, not the new "2".

Here'sTaylor's web page on the Expression system: https://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/acoustic/features/electronics/expression-system

And here's a downloadable PDF: https://www.taylorguitars.com/sites/default/files/10_UnderstandingES.pdf
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 25, 2015,
#13
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^^^ Yes, it's a good idea to have a spare saddle on hand if you plan on modding the original one.

I would get a second opinion on lowering the saddle. My mate sells Taylors, so I'll ask him about shimming versus saddle lowering when next I see him.. My feeling is that the increments available from shims might be too coarse for fine-tuning action height, but you never know. I don't think it is a very daring operation on Taylors if you have the right wrenches and shims.

I'll also have a closer look at those battery dimensions. - The same problem might turn up elsewhere, so it is worth keeping in mind.


Thanks Tony, will appreciating if you could ask your friend about lowering bridge action via sanding saddle or via shims. There is no hurry as its going to take about 2 months before the spare saddle arrives.

PS: I changed the string pegs and truss rod cover from plastic ones to ebony. I ordered a spare bone saddle and nut to replace the existing plastic ones as well. The sucky part of the bone nut is that it comes without the string guides and I have to send it to a tech to file it. The real question is after changing away all these plastics away, is there going to be change in tone or is this more of a 'feel good' therapy? LOL!
#14
Hi Captain

I guess its the price to pay to be unique!...LOL I do agree that being a leftie sucks, guitar choices are much fewer, more expensive, less discount during promotions, spare parts are a pain, and if I happened to want to impress a girl at the bar, I don't think there are lefty guitars hanging around....hahaha!!!!!

The string actions are high on all strings. While I am now still playing around the first 4 frets it has a very slight impact on the accuracy of finger tip placement on the strings as well as how close my fingers have to be to the fret wire.

Thanks for the video on guitar tech. I know its a matter of time before I have to do some of this work on my own because I cannot be running to the store every time I need something adjusted as guitars are a personal thing.

Thanks for putting my heart at easy at least for sanding the saddle part. and I download the PDF to get a better understanding of my Taylor.

Wow! congrats on the 115CE, incidentally how much did you pay for it? Looking at a 12 stringer intimidates me at the moment...LOL!!!
#15
Buying a guitar will depend on how you would want it to look like, the size and your budget. I heard Gibson and Ibanez offer smaller guitars. You may consider either an electro- acoustic guitars or semi-acoustic guitars. They both create different sounds. However, most reviews recommend an electro acoustic guitar though others said it may not sound as a real as an acoustic guitar unless one use an amplifier.
#16
Quote by Blueberrie Swir
Buying a guitar will depend on how you would want it to look like, the size and your budget. I heard Gibson and Ibanez offer smaller guitars.
This statement is so very wrong. Gibson's Asian division is "Epiphone". Epiphone deals in a great many Gibson type models. Ibanez has little to less than nothing to do with Gibson.
Quote by Blueberrie Swir
You may consider either an electro- acoustic guitars or semi-acoustic guitars. They both create different sounds. However, most reviews recommend an electro acoustic guitar though others said it may not sound as a real as an acoustic guitar unless one use an amplifier.
OK, the TS has already stated his budget, and the guitars he's considering. So no real help from this post.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 2, 2015,