#1
I've been playing 10 months steady and often. I feel like 1-2 hours after a hot shower my finger tips still aren't fully ready to play guitar. Is this normal?
#2
interesting ?. can't say that i have that issue. your fingers probably haven't built up callouses to a great degree yet.
#3
I agree with Monwo, you probably just haven't built up your callouses yet. You are still in the beginning stages of playing, so that is common.

For what it's worth, my morning practice session is right after my shower. It feels great to get out of the shower and then sit down and practice.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#4
So you think after 10 months of consistent playing that is still normal? Wow... yeah I noticed recently when playing a cheap guitar my fingers still hurt quickly
#5
Quote by panman36
So you think after 10 months of consistent playing that is still normal? Wow... yeah I noticed recently when playing a cheap guitar my fingers still hurt quickly


I would say so. Mind you it has been many years since i was a 10 months but if i remember correctly it took me between 1 and 3 years to get comfortable with the guitar. For some people it takes longer than others to get your fingers used to the guitar, so i wouldn't worry too much about it. Just practice as much as you can, if it starts to hurt take a break and come back to it later.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#6
Quote by panman36
So you think after 10 months of consistent playing that is still normal? Wow... yeah I noticed recently when playing a cheap guitar my fingers still hurt quickly


well this probably translates to poorly setup. whe i first started to play (in the prehistoric late 70s) my first few guitars were all total crap and had action that would scare most people these days. you build callouses fast playing stuff like that. when you get wet like in a shower your callouses do soften of even come off. once you get better technique when playing you won't notice your fingers very much if at all. newbies tend to press way to hard and that hurts the fingers. in time that will go away.
#7
One of the things I do when I my fingers are bit a bit sweaty or they are sticking here and there to the neck, is I wash my hands with warm soapy water. I use a paper towel to dry, then I use the same damp paper towel on the back of my guitar neck. It's a trick I learned playing pool for many years. I'm not sure if this helps, but it couldn't hurt. Also, I use a clean green scrubbie on the back of the neck as well. It removes any grime that can build up and keeps it smooth.
#8
I've been playing 54 years, and still have problems when my fingers are wet. Even high humidity gives me trouble, my fingers can't slide on the neck when I play leads. This has nothing to do with callouses, when I played for a living daily for 8 years in the 80's I still had the same problem. In some cases I would find a hot stove or even the fire on a cigarette to try and dry out my fingertips so I could play. Any time I do outdoor gigs, I have a really hard time if humidity is high, the dry skin of my callouses seems to absorb a lot of that moisture and I can't play, I'm fumbling around all night unless I find a way to dry out the fingertips. We're booked outdoors for 4th of July and I'm already not looking forward to it...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#9
I've heard of using rubbing alcohol after showers to dry the skin out. Personally I try to avoid playing directly after showering or washing dishes.