#1
Hi

Recently I have seen some great slap guitar players such as Rob scallon and have decided that I want to learn the technique.

However when I try and slap, the pops end up being about 10x as loud as the slaps and the slaps are very quiet, so what is going wrong?

In addition can you refer me to any good videos/articles about slap GUITAR in specific?alarmist all I find are about bass, and while the technique is basically the same, it'd be good to have something for guitar players.
#2
My immediate inclination would be towards heavier strings. Damp noodles tend not to feel much of an impact, whereas something like 12-54 in E standard has a pretty nice response.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#5
Compression, all day. I just got the SD Vice Grip and its a beast of a comp pedal.
#6
I've got some questions regarding slap technique on guitar.
Can you slap one single string? Cause I can't. I can make sound only one string by muting the others with my hand, but I'm actually hitting a few strings.
The other thing is that I hit the string almost as often as I miss it. How to improve this? If I do it slowly to gain accuracy, the string does not sound at all.
#7
Quote by Orientation

Can you slap one single string? Cause I can't. I can make sound only one string by muting the others with my hand, but I'm actually hitting a few strings.


Yes you can. You have to be very precise when doing slapping, since you mentioned you might hit other strings. Which way you choose to slap might have affect aswell. I slap through the string, meaning i slap the string with my thumb and land on the next string. (so if i am slapping the A string, my thumb goes through it and rests on the D string. So i can choose to go back up again if i'd like)

This is very much double thumbing on guitar, victor wooten is probably most famous for this technique on bass.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-N54p2YlQg

Quote by Orientation

The other thing is that I hit the string almost as often as I miss it. How to improve this? If I do it slowly to gain accuracy, the string does not sound at all.


Then you are doing something wrong. You should not be needing speed to make it audible, just like you don't need speed to pluck a string. Regardless if you slap the way i do or with the more traditional style (bouncing off the string) you just need to give it a little hit with the side of your thumb. If you are using the traditional style, make sure to hit the bone-y side of your thumb. Then it is just a matter of slow repetition until it is habit.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#8
Mr Guthrie Govan himself is a pretty good slap guitarist
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwg39a-VOsU

Quote by K33nbl4d3
My immediate inclination would be towards heavier strings. Damp noodles tend not to feel much of an impact, whereas something like 12-54 in E standard has a pretty nice response.


Yeah you're right, those strings would slap well, as in they'd slap you across your face when they break from the insane amount of tension. Even if you can get it to work with a short scale length and sturdy neck, 12s is overkill anyway, you can get great slap sounds from 11s or even 10s, if you have good technique it doesn't matter what gauge you use (Guthrie uses 10s for example).

One thing I've noticed from mine and many others' playing (some may do this differently), is that slap comes almost entirely from the wrist. I tend to keep my fingers slightly curled inwards so when I 'pop' a note with my fingers, all I have to do is twist my wrist and the string gets caught on my index finger on the way, pulling the string up (which makes the note more snappy). So you twist your hand one way to slap your thumb down, and then twist the opposite way to pop. It's the most ergonomic and efficient way I've found, and it sounds really good, though there are other ways to do slap which lends itself to different styles and sounds; much like Sickz, Wooten tends to do more of a rest stroke (going through the string and landing on the string below it), which allows for double thumping, and keeps your hand in a position that most bassists prefer (with your fingers pointed down). You'll have to experiment, I recommend watching some great bassists do slap, and see what sounds best to you and how it's done.
Quote by Fat Lard
post of the year, thank you
#9
Quote by Jimjambanx
Yeah you're right, those strings would slap well, as in they'd slap you across your face when they break from the insane amount of tension. Even if you can get it to work with a short scale length and sturdy neck, 12s is overkill anyway, you can get great slap sounds from 11s or even 10s, if you have good technique it doesn't matter what gauge you use (Guthrie uses 10s for example).

Do you actually believe that 12s can't handle standard tuning and/or that a normal guitar neck can't handle that tension? I mean, bear in mind that's a perfectly normal gauge for acoustics, which are structurally less resilient than electrics, and that back in the first decade or two of electric guitars it'd be perfectly normal too, even on those truss-rod-less Esquires. Sorry, but this is an absolutely bizarre thing to say, and I can only imagine you've never tried it yourself because my Tele (admittedly with a thick maple neck) barely needed adjustment to go from 10s to 12s.

I said that 12s will have a better response for slap, and I can tell you that that's very audibly true. You're also right that a decent slap player will be able to work with 10s or 11s just as well, but the rest of what you said in this paragraph is complete nonsense.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#10
Quote by K33nbl4d3
Do you actually believe that 12s can't handle standard tuning and/or that a normal guitar neck can't handle that tension? I mean, bear in mind that's a perfectly normal gauge for acoustics, which are structurally less resilient than electrics, and that back in the first decade or two of electric guitars it'd be perfectly normal too, even on those truss-rod-less Esquires. Sorry, but this is an absolutely bizarre thing to say, and I can only imagine you've never tried it yourself because my Tele (admittedly with a thick maple neck) barely needed adjustment to go from 10s to 12s.

I said that 12s will have a better response for slap, and I can tell you that that's very audibly true. You're also right that a decent slap player will be able to work with 10s or 11s just as well, but the rest of what you said in this paragraph is complete nonsense.


I've played a lot of lower end guitars that bow like crazy when I put strings above 11s on them (mainly mahogany necks), and sometimes it required drilling of tuning posts and/or adjusting the nut just so it would sit. It's also not really fair to compare electric strings to acoustics, they're made of completely different alloys and create different amounts of tension, 12s on an acoustic would be more comparable to 10s on an electric (I use 13s on acoustic and 11s on electric, and the tension is roughly the same).

And yes 12s will have a better response, but remember that the thicker the strings, the more force is needed to get them moving. To get the same level of output as you would from say 10's or 11's, you'd need to hit considerably harder, even though the output ceiling of 12s would be higher. My point is it's unnecessary, just use whatever's comfortable.
Quote by Fat Lard
post of the year, thank you
#11
Quote by Jimjambanx
I've played a lot of lower end guitars that bow like crazy when I put strings above 11s on them (mainly mahogany necks), and sometimes it required drilling of tuning posts and/or adjusting the nut just so it would sit. It's also not really fair to compare electric strings to acoustics, they're made of completely different alloys and create different amounts of tension, 12s on an acoustic would be more comparable to 10s on an electric (I use 13s on acoustic and 11s on electric, and the tension is roughly the same).

And yes 12s will have a better response, but remember that the thicker the strings, the more force is needed to get them moving. To get the same level of output as you would from say 10's or 11's, you'd need to hit considerably harder, even though the output ceiling of 12s would be higher. My point is it's unnecessary, just use whatever's comfortable.

Mahogany necks can indeed be pretty unstable, and nut/tuning post adjustments aren't fun (though the tuning posts have never been a problem for me; cheap nuts have), but tension-wise?
12-54 electric, average tension ~23lb
12-53 acoustic, average tension ~25lb

I can't claim a good understanding of the physics behind the sound different string gauges produce (the tension is about the limit of where I know what I'm doing) but my experience is entirely contrary to this. On 12s I find a relatively light slap can produce a decent sounding note, I have a harder time getting slaps on 10s or 11s to sound remotely decent. But then slapping isn't really a technique I use; I can only speak for what I do know, which is that, as (I would say) a relatively decent player but one that doesn't usually slap, I have a much easier time getting an alright slap sound from 12s In other words, for someone starting out (and in particular for someone who, like the OP, was annoyed at the volume imbalance between their slaps and pops), 12s would be the easier option. I still have no idea what you were talking about with the "ridiculous tension" that'll cause them to break and apparently slap you across the face.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#12
Well, if I use the Wooten technique in order to slap the strings, I can do it in slow motion and it'll sound. I just can't make the Govan technique work slow, I mean he plays with the joint of his thumb bouncing off only one string.