#1
I love new strings, and I was thinking about asking for 20 or so packs when the holidays roll around. Could I keep strings for a year and have them still playing like fresh strings from guitar center? This goes for both sealed packages like Ernie Balls and unsealed like Elixir Acoustic Strings.
#2
Quote by The Bacon Man
I love new strings, and I was thinking about asking for 20 or so packs when the holidays roll around. Could I keep strings for a year and have them still playing like fresh strings from guitar center? This goes for both sealed packages like Ernie Balls and unsealed like Elixir Acoustic Strings.


You should be good.

"Fresh strings from Guitar Center" aren't, sometimes. Depending on what you're buying, you've gotta realize that Guitar Center buys large quantities of strings for inventory. They'll sit in a fulfillment center in Tennessee or Utah until one of the stores needs to replace inventory. Then they'll sit at the GC until they get sold.

There are some places on the planet where strings come out of those packages rusted, even if they're only a few months old. If I were you, I'd stuff your 20 or so packs of strings into a ziploc with one of those gel packs. Better yet, go to theruststore.com and pick up a VCI (Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor) and stuff THAT in the bag with them. Better yet, go to one of the gun stores and pick up one of the VCI bags that they store guns in. These are specially designed to inhibit corrosion on blued guns when stored for long periods of time. Put your strings inside, zip them up and you're good to go.

http://www.storeguns.com/corrosion-inhibitors/z-corr-vci-bags
Last edited by dspellman at Jun 22, 2015,
#3
I have strings still in the pack. Been over 6 years.


I rarely change strings because I have ways to keep them from rusting and still intonate well.
#4
Quote by dspellman
You should be good.

"Fresh strings from Guitar Center" aren't, sometimes. Depending on what you're buying, you've gotta realize that Guitar Center buys large quantities of strings for inventory. They'll sit in a fulfillment center in Tennessee or Utah until one of the stores needs to replace inventory. Then they'll sit at the GC until they get sold.

There are some places on the planet where strings come out of those packages rusted, even if they're only a few months old. If I were you, I'd stuff your 20 or so packs of strings into a ziploc with one of those gel packs. Better yet, go to theruststore.com and pick up a VCI (Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor) and stuff THAT in the bag with them. Better yet, go to one of the gun stores and pick up one of the VCI bags that they store guns in. These are specially designed to inhibit corrosion on blued guns when stored for long periods of time. Put your strings inside, zip them up and you're good to go.

http://www.storeguns.com/corrosion-inhibitors/z-corr-vci-bags


Thank you!
#6
Quote by dspellman
You should be good.

"Fresh strings from Guitar Center" aren't, sometimes. Depending on what you're buying, you've gotta realize that Guitar Center buys large quantities of strings for inventory. They'll sit in a fulfillment center in Tennessee or Utah until one of the stores needs to replace inventory. Then they'll sit at the GC until they get sold.

There are some places on the planet where strings come out of those packages rusted, even if they're only a few months old. If I were you, I'd stuff your 20 or so packs of strings into a ziploc with one of those gel packs. Better yet, go to theruststore.com and pick up a VCI (Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor) and stuff THAT in the bag with them. Better yet, go to one of the gun stores and pick up one of the VCI bags that they store guns in. These are specially designed to inhibit corrosion on blued guns when stored for long periods of time. Put your strings inside, zip them up and you're good to go.

http://www.storeguns.com/corrosion-inhibitors/z-corr-vci-bags


Agree with all of the above.
Seal them, use some kind of rust, corrosion inhibitor.
Some kind of desiccant (Silica Gel ( https://www.google.com/search?q=desiccant&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=643&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=FQOJVb-ODsGcsQXpt4KQDQ&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg )), which you can find in a lot of packages with electronics inside them.
If they are exposed to air for to long, they can rust while still in the package.
Especially in a damp climate.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jun 23, 2015,
#7
Somebody once gave me a pack of strings which he'd brought in bulk like 20 years earlier and they where a bit rusty.
They were in an unsealed pack though.
I hope sealed packs do better because I've got a couple of years worth of strings lying around now too
I can say that a sealed pack is still good after 3 years or so (and counting)
#8
Quote by xnameisonx

I hope sealed packs do better because I've got a couple of years worth of strings lying around now too
I can say that a sealed pack is still good after 3 years or so (and counting)


Some sealed packs aren't all that "sealed."
NASA and the military have been using VCI packaging for *everything* that gets stored for any length of time. VCI's give off a vapor that actually coats things with a barrier just a few molecules thick (you can't feel it or see it) that helps prevent corrosion.

Fact is, if you've got your guitar mostly in a case, it's a good idea to toss one of the small emitter type VCIs in the case with the guitar. This is especially true if you have a guitar with a nitrocellulose finish or with one of those old "tortoise shell" pickguards. Nitrocellulose, as it breaks down, outgasses sulfuric acid and nitric acid (same with those old pickguards). Not only will that corrode strings, screws, pickup covers, coil wire, bridges, strap buttons, pots and tuners, but it will turn on itself and help accelerate that decomposition of both pickguard and finish. A VCI in the case will slow that all WAAAAY down.
#9
Unless you live near the ocean, where there is a substantial amount of salt in the air from the salt water, you should be fine. Heat and cold will not affect the strings; even if you live in the Sahara desert or northern Alaska. Steel and nickel alloys are pretty good that way. The only problem that sometimes presents itself when keeping strings for years is the possibility of moisture condensing inside of the plastic package. In very humid places, this could happen if the strings are not kept someplace dry. If the plastic package is not thoroughly sealed, you should either (a.) seal it yourself - you can do it carefully with a clothes iron on LOW heat, or (b.) take them out of the plastic package and put them into something that will not allow moisture to condense on it, like paper or cardboard.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#10
Keep all my strings in a Ziploc freezer bag (not in the freezer )