#1
I was wondering if someone were to list for me the major pros and cons of both guitars, I am interested in buying one. I am already familiar with the fender stratocaster considering that I have owned one for many years. I play mostly music like Brand New, Circa Survive, Deftones, Nirvana, Every Time I Die, etc etc so I was wondering which guitar would be suited for these genres. The mustang I had been most keen on was the American special one.
#2
i am not going to list specs and pros and cons, but i will tell you to try a guitar with a 24" scale neck first.

i thought i wanted on a long time ago, almost ordered one blind, then i played one, and i hated how jammed my fingers were on the fretboard. it may not seem much different on paper being 3/4" shorter than a LP, but damn i will tell you it makes a pretty big difference.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#3
Stick with the Strat. A Mustang just doesn't do it for most players. Jag is nice but Strat is nicer.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
The Mustang was traditionally close to the bottom of the Fender line, the Jaguar designed to be at the top of it, with corresponding fit and finish. The strat and tele were somewhere in between. The Jaguar was supposed to compete with Gibson's guitars, but never really sold well. Production was shut down in 1975. They were still great guitars, so the punk-rock scene picked up on used ones that were going for a song as a sort of "anti-whatever's-popular" thing. Eventually Fender reissued them (in the US) in 1999 and now has them in both expensive and cheap (Squier) versions. Originals are worth money, current versions not so much.

First on your list should be an evaluation of how you get on with that short scale. Then you want to decide if all the switching is your cup of tea. Then decide if single coil is really the direction you want to go, and if the sound is where you want it. And finally, decide how you look pretending to be a real punk rocker with it <G>. A shiny new one won't do much for your "credibility", of course, but that's a different call.

Almost anything with passive pickups is suitable for playing the bands you've mentioned.
#6
Keep in mind, there are a lot of Mustang and Jaguar versions out there now, I'll just mention them as the classic designs as they were in the 60's/70's.

Tonally

Fender Mustang = Sort of a metallic, woody, yet hoopy sort of sound depending on pickup combination. Neck pickup - hoopy, rubber, almost acoustic-like tone, both on, brassy yet tubby tone, sort of like a Tele + Strat merged, bridge is very twangy - think Ritchie Blackmore, that's what I used to use my Mustang for. Vintage mustangs have weaker pickups (5.5K Ohms on the average), the modern ones have Stratocaster output ratings (6.4K Ohms).


Fender Jaguar = Rubbery, has a somewhat gretsch-like Midrange snarl to it in all but neck pickup only, neck pickup is very smooth, warm, has an interesting tubby effect to it. the bridge pickup, while twangy, can vary a lot. Some of the newer Jaguars have a hotter 11K ohm Bridge pickup (CP & Squier) and can really be nudged into Gibson territory with high gain giving sort of an early Def Leppard sound if you EQ just right. The rhythm circuit is something I use a lot for leads, it has that warm, smooth "end of Bohemian Rhapsody" thing to it when heavily distorted - which also helps bring some sustain to the Jag with the weird bridge setup.

Playability

Both are 24" scale and feel a bit similar neck to neck. The vintage examples have 4 neck widths, A being narrowest, D being widest, and B being the most common. I prefer A width necks. The Japanese ones are based on A and B width necks.

Both have switching that takes some getting used to to use it in it's stock format. The Mustang has 2 individual switches, which makes pickup selection changes in a live situation a bit tricky. My Jag-Stang had the same switching, I rewired it to have the bridge pickup switch change pickups and the neck pickup switch do "tone" modifications like phasing and kill and whatnot.

The Jaguar is only slightly less tricky. Typically with a Jaguar, I use the rhythm circuit to switch to neck pickup only, and usually have the lead on the bridge pickup, both knobs wide open, and just use the neck switch to add the neck pickup in with the bridge, and use the strangle when I want less lows. If I really want a sharper neck pickup tone, then I hold my fingers a certain way and snap/twist them to flick the pickup switches into the opposing setting(S) (ie. Neck on Bridge Off), it works but takes some practice to get used to.

The Mustang trem does stay in tune, I had a 66' Mustang, and have a 95' Jag-Stang, both have the same vibrato unit in general, both of them I abuse far harder than I do my Floyd Rose guitars (I actually prefer them to the Floyd Rose). Much of the problem with tuning comes from using the factory setup, you want the tailpiece angled back a little bit so it's riding on the "knife edge" in the tremolo/bridgeplate/tailplate, especially as Fender does not bevel those from the factory anymore. They also have great range, and certain versions/iterations of that vibrato can have a mild "Trans-Trem" like effect on certain strings due to the bridge rocking with the string movement.

The Jaguar is a bit trickier in the vibrato category. You typically have a separate mobile bridge and a tailpiece about 7" away from the bridge. It's not as responsive and does not have the range of the Mustang trem, but it's not as weak as people make it out to be. First trick of the vibrato is to get a stable bridge, Mastery, Staytrem, Mustang (7.16" Radius necks only), or my trick which is putting super-strong springs on the Low E and high E saddles (such as a Humbucker mount spring cut in half) to box in the other saddles. You can obtain a bit more range by using lighter strings and setting the spring at it's most equal point (ie, the one that allows the most downward travel), at that point you can get into 1st Record Van-Halen dive-bomb territory (not enough to limp strings, but enough to fake a full Dive bomb).

Also, comfort wise, I like the Jaguar more because I'm a big guy, I've been told the Mustang looks like a "toy" on me. But if you're of smaller stature, the Mustang can look pretty darned cool Aesthetically and be very comfortable, especially the contoured models.

For what you are doing, the Jaguar might be a better choice tone-wise because it'll have stronger pickups (especially the Squire VM and Fender CP Special models), a few more selection options, and Jaguars react to fuzz pedals much like Jazzmasters do (one word - Amazing). Mustang's always seem to have a "rickety" feel to their sound, and might need a stronger pickup in some situations, which would warrant possible routing and pickup replacement where one could easily skirt by with a Jaguar CP Special/Vintage Modified/40th Anniversary due to the stronger and higher output pickups.
My Current Mains
- 1996 Fender Jag-Stang with EMG Pickups
- 1998 Fender Jaguar with Cool Rails
- 1982 Hondo Paul Dean II (DiMarzio Super II X2)
- 2010 "Fender" Jazzmaster (Home built)
- 2013 Squier VM Bass VI (stock)
#8
I think it depends on the particular model. I prefer the Mustang, but I have one of the spiffier, MIJ models ('65RI) and it suits me perfectly. I have other guitars so I don't need versatility, I want it to sound like a Mustang, and it does its job extremely well. But if I wanted something more versatile, I'd probably go with an hb loaded Jag. You just really never know if you're gonna like a guitar til you play that specific guitar.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#9
Wow Mad-Mike wrote a book! Nicely done and it shows you have spent many hours with these 24" Fender variants. If you ever need a job call me. Points for thoroughness.

The Jags I liked the best- vintage early 60s. It was a very nice guitar that felt good in my hands.

The Mustangs I liked the best- 80s JP reissues. I thought they were better than original 60s Mustangs but still never felt/played very well to me.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#10
Both look and play great for the most part. I prefer the look of a Jag though.

Either way, I've never been able to work with Single Coils, so I currently don't have either. I have been eyeing a Japanese HH Jag though.
#11
i said it earlier, play a 24"er before you buy one. they are cool guitars, but they may not be workable for everybody.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#12
Quote by trashedlostfdup
i said it earlier, play a 24"er before you buy one. they are cool guitars, but they may not be workable for everybody.

+1.5", the tiny lil neck is far more noticeable when you're playing it. I instantly loved it but after a while I noticed I ran out of room for some things. If you have larger hands or stubby fingers you're not gonna like the lil neck. Even if you have smaller hands, if you're use to a wider fretboard, you're probably gonna struggle. You have to pick the guitar up yourself and play it, otherwise its pure speculation. Do not underestimate the difference of .75"-1.5"!
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#13
Quote by lucky1978
+1.5", the tiny lil neck is far more noticeable when you're playing it. I instantly loved it but after a while I noticed I ran out of room for some things. If you have larger hands or stubby fingers you're not gonna like the lil neck. Even if you have smaller hands, if you're use to a wider fretboard, you're probably gonna struggle. You have to pick the guitar up yourself and play it, otherwise its pure speculation. Do not underestimate the difference of .75"-1.5"!



+1. I Have short, skinny fingers, but I still had to sell my Jaguar becasue the neck gave me cramps in the long run. Be sure that you try out a short scale neck before you buy one, just in case. If it doesn't feel quie right, there is always jazzmasters, which have the standard fender 25.5" neck.


That being said... Nothing is more sexy than a candy apple red jaguar with a tortoiseshell pickguard.

#14
Quote by Cajundaddy
Wow Mad-Mike wrote a book! Nicely done and it shows you have spent many hours with these 24" Fender variants. If you ever need a job call me. Points for thoroughness.

The Jags I liked the best- vintage early 60s. It was a very nice guitar that felt good in my hands.

The Mustangs I liked the best- 80s JP reissues. I thought they were better than original 60s Mustangs but still never felt/played very well to me.


Thanks to all on that. *Stang's and Jags are what I use for "daily drivers", and I typically play New Wave/Post-Punk infused Hard Rock/Metal as of late.

I tend to favor my Jag-Stang for standard tuning, one thing I did not mention is the Jaguar trem is at a benefit if you use alternate tunings or drop-tune a lot (both of which I do).

However, the Jag-Stang I consider my main. Jag-Stangs are like Mustangs in feel and in tone with single coils, but a little fatter due to the thicker and less dense Basswood body. Fender tried to compensate for this "wooliness" by using a weak 7.5K humbucker as stock, but all it does is makes the guitar anemic. I use an EMG SA/81 set in mine, after some "Taming" through treble bypass and no-load tone I got a tighter, brighter sound out of it - sounds a lot like a Les Paul with more bass but with the Fender twangy high thing to it and a naturally scooped midrange.

These are the two I use the most often both live and in the studio....
1995 Fender Jag-Stang (MIJ) - EMG Pickups

1998 Fender Jaguar (CIJ) - Seymour Duncan Cool Rails modified into "Jag-buckers"
My Current Mains
- 1996 Fender Jag-Stang with EMG Pickups
- 1998 Fender Jaguar with Cool Rails
- 1982 Hondo Paul Dean II (DiMarzio Super II X2)
- 2010 "Fender" Jazzmaster (Home built)
- 2013 Squier VM Bass VI (stock)
#15
Quote by Mad-Mike_J83
Keep in mind, there are a lot of Mustang and Jaguar versions out there now, I'll just mention them as the classic designs as they were in the 60's/70's.


---much left out-----


And there you have it from Encyclopedia Jaguaria.
#16
Quote by dspellman
And there you have it from Encyclopedia Jaguaria.


Yeah, a lot of that is left out because the newer models eliminate the "unique" aespects of the originals...

- Jaguar HH Special (CIJ/MIJ) no tremolo, humbuckers (albeit weak ones)
- Squier Jaguar VM HH (Indonesia/China?), humbuckers, simplified circuitry, hardtail
- Jaguar CP HH (Mexico) - Different wiring, Tune-O-Matic bridge (more stable), Buckers'
- Jaguar CP Special - Tune-O-Matic in place of regular bridge
**the CP models have a shorter distance between the trem and bridge = more stability
- Jaguar Kurt Cobain tribute - 3-way, Tune-O-Matic, wiring, humbuckers
- Jaguar Modern Player (China) - basically a 24" Scale Jaguar bodied Les Paul Special
- Jaguar Johnny Marr (USA) - Different Wiring, Staytrem bridge
- Jaguar 50th Anniversary - modern tremolo spacing (2 inches shorter distance)

TOM = more stable, no loose saddles/intonation/action screws

Modern Trem Spacing = more stable, sharper breakover over bridge

Humbuckers = can possibly change tone, on the CObain and CP it really makes a difference, on the HH Special, the pickups are pretty anemic so it's practically a hardtail normal Jaguar sound-wise (actually, a S-coil Jag sounds thicker to my ears)

Wiring Alterations - these are common to a lot of the new models because people have a hard time figuring out what 4 switches and 4 pots actually do to the guitar in question

That's why I left those out, all the qualms with the Jaguar are eliminated when you have a hardtail with 2 humbuckers/P-90s, 1 volume, and 1 tone control. At that point it's basically like most other hard rock oriented guitars of more recent make.
My Current Mains
- 1996 Fender Jag-Stang with EMG Pickups
- 1998 Fender Jaguar with Cool Rails
- 1982 Hondo Paul Dean II (DiMarzio Super II X2)
- 2010 "Fender" Jazzmaster (Home built)
- 2013 Squier VM Bass VI (stock)