#1
So my band is starting to gain momentum and is getting ready to record but we are having the problem of uneven dedication. Me and the bassist are super committed while the other half of the band doesn't seem that interested in participating.

Since I have experience with recording and releasing an album, I'm probably going to end up in charge of engineering, production, mixing, mastering, publishing, and copywriting, not to mention recording vocals and guitars. On top of that I am writing 70% of the material.

I like the idea of splitting royalties and credits evenly, but since I'm putting in so much more work, it seems fair that I receive more compensation, assuming we even make a profit. At the same time, this is also a delicate situation, since two of the other guys in the band are my best friends.

I was hoping some of you UGers could offer your opinion and experience.

All comments are appreciated.
#2
Talk to them. I would put it more in a motivational way instead of complaining. Be like"yo, are you guys in? Because we've gotten this far and i feel like you guys aren't 100% in. This is our first album!! Don't you want a good result? I need you guys to want this." Be serious when you ask them if they want to be part of it because maybe, they just have low expectations or don't really feel as enthusiastic as you.
#3
I've been in this very situation myself, and my band drifted on for a year like that before coming to an end. I would explain it to them, and and if they still don't seem too pushed, find yourself some equally dedicated band members. If you put in all the hard work of recording an album/ep and you have half a band that doesn't really care about it, it's a total waste of time and effort. We recorded an album and gigged solidly for that year, and when the band broke up, looking back at it, it was a whole year dedicated to a dying band. Some musicians live for music, some musicians don't. You want to be making music with the ones that do. Trust me.
Last edited by gurg06 at Jun 25, 2015,
#4
What would you like them to do extra? Write more of the songs? Record the album instead of you?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Quote by AlanHB
What would you like them to do extra? Write more of the songs? Record the album instead of you?


I don't get the impression he wants them to do anything extra, he just wants a larger slice of the pie for his efforts and is asking us to justify it for him.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#6
Quote by Arby911
I don't get the impression he wants them to do anything extra, he just wants a larger slice of the pie for his efforts and is asking us to justify it for him.


No, he's wondering what to do to get them to pull their weight without ruining the relationship with his bandmates.
#7
Quote by RyanLoftusMusic

I like the idea of splitting royalties and credits evenly, but since I'm putting in so much more work, it seems fair that I receive more compensation, assuming we even make a profit.


There's no way you're going to make any money from this. They likely know this so they are behaving accordingly.

If you're confident enough, just make them sign a contract saying you get whatever share you think you deserve for cd sales/radio play/shows/whatever. If they disagree, present them the arguments you presented us. If they still disagree, either they or you are douchebags and you will need to find more appropriate band arrangements.

The only thing that is almost guaranteed is that you're not going to make a penny out of any of this.
#8
Thanks for the suggestions everyone.
Metal solo artist and online writer.
Check out my site ryanloftusonline.com
#9
FWIW I think you need to talk this through. I don't think you will make money because statistically so few bands or musicians do, but you might get the breaks so planning for it makes sense.

If these are your songs then you should probably retain them, you might move on to recruit new band members or even a new band and want to take the songs with you. If however someone has contributed a great hook line or contributed to the arrangement then you might want to credit them. Do it on a song by song basis but be generous if someone else comes up with a song that they get full credit. Just a set of lyrics and a chord sequence aren't a song however so be prepared to give a little.

Share any fees paid for playing live equally.

Is their lack of commitment only over recording and song writing? Some people only want to get on stage and play, and that is fair enough. It's really comfortable to have a good frontman and or bandleader who organises everything, so all you have to do is literally play your part. Their fair share is only of performance money, as mentioned, if they want song writing returns then obviously they need to write songs. If however their lack of commitment is holding you back because they aren't learning their parts then you have to start keeping an eye open for replacements. It's a tricky balancing act, as bands who stick together tend to do better but people don't really change so don't expect too much.

Managing people is much harder than managing recordings or learning your instrument, just avoid any make or break moments and keep talking. Avoid making anything personal though, talk about issues and what they want to get out of it and be gentle with people.
Last edited by Phil Starr at Jun 27, 2015,
#10
Earlier this year I finished a recording project with my partner that involved creating a CD compilation selected from past recordings we have done. We were about to celebrate 19 years together and we wanted to do a kind of history mixed with a few new songs that were recorded strictly for this new CD.

Our goal was to do a professional level recording and mastering (re-mastering in case of older recordings) with the sole intent of giving away an initial 250 CD's to our regular followers as well as new people who come out to see us. We had no plans to sell the CD's so profit was not an issue. We planned to handle the costs ourselves.

From past experience I know that a project like this can often drag on and often never actually get finished. I was determined not to let that happen. Back in December of 2014 I came up with a written proposal (almost a business plan) that laid out the budget and cost of the whole project in specific terms (every detail). We set a date; May 31, 2015 as the date of completion with a CD party at one of the clubs we regularly play. We established a rough working schedule that listed a time frame when each step of the project had to be completed which insured that we stayed on track. Once we agreed to all of this making any necessary changes to both the budget and the schedule we did our best to stick to it. From that day on everything moved forward with very few glitches and we easily made our completion date and had our celebration party on May 31 where we gave away a lot of CDs and had a great time.

Planning and having all parties agree to a specific plan was the key to getting our project completed to everyone's satisfaction.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jul 13, 2015,