#1
I've been playing guitar for quite some time and I know quite a bit of theory. I can also read music but I generally don't. I think it's just out of convenience that I generally revert back to tabs and chords.
So, I'd like to try and start to focus on reading sheet music when I play guitar. I think that it would open a lot of doors for me.
Does anyone have any resources that they would be willing to share that could be useful? Any lessons on reading sheet music, songs that work well for beginner readers, online lessons, videos, etc.
Basically anything that I could use. I plan on spending this summer trying to apply this as much as possible so that by the time that the fall comes I could be confident enough to look into teaching beginners (I've been playing for about 10 years).
#2
Get a good songbook. If you want to start over from scratch, I recommend ''A Modern Method for Guitar'' by William Leavitt alongside ''A Modern Method Songbook Jazz'' or ''A Modern Method songbook Rock''. Depends on what you like.

When you work through the books you can lend songbooks from certain albums at the library (probably). But I found them to be a little inaccurate (from my one and only one of these library books I ever rented.) But I guess in general they must be accurate (it was a very fast run I looked up in that book).
#3
If you already know how to read music you could just grab some music sheet with pieces composed for solo guitar (Tarrega is good) and play it. I think it's fun figuring in which position and which strings (although in good book it would be marked) play certain bars etc.
#4
Hi Leafs

Sorry to interrupt on your thread, and I absolutely mean no disrespect but when you said reading sheet music, are you referring to staff notations of music or songs? I have a little knowledge on staff notations will that not help me with reading sheet music written in staff notations or are you referring to something else?

If you like to have a quick and dirty crash course as a refresher, I would recommend Music Theory for Dummies Second Edition by Michael Pilhofer and Holly Day. Don't let the title fool you as its quite detailed which the book applies to both the piano and guitar. It may be too basic for you, but its a good reference guide.

I am curious on Liampje's recommendation....I go check it out.
Last edited by stkhoo at Jun 26, 2015,
#5
Here are a couple of Staff Reading Lessons I published in 2009 that have helped a great many people.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/throw_the_boy_down_the_well.html

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/throw_the_boy_down_the_well_part_2.html

Hope they help.

Best,

Sean
#6
Quote by stkhoo
Hi Leafs

Sorry to interrupt on your thread, and I absolutely mean no disrespect but when you said reading sheet music, are you referring to staff notations of music or songs? I have a little knowledge on staff notations will that not help me with reading sheet music written in staff notations or are you referring to something else?


Sorry, I was vague in how I explained myself. I can read staff notation (the letters quite quickly, the rhythm I'm working on) but when I look at my guitar I think of scales in that I think, "I'm in this key, here is the I, iii, Vi, etc."
It makes it quite difficult to apply my knowledge when I should be thinking. "I'm in this key, here is C, E, A, etc."

So, I'm looking for exercises that can help me change my point of view for the guitar. Mainly so that I can more easily learn other instruments and play music that I find not arranged for guitar.

Also, thanks guys for these ideas. They seem like some good starting points.
#7
^ What's wrong with using your knowledge of scales and chords and whatever to help? That's why you learn them, so that you don't need to think.

Or is the problem that you can't find the correct notes on your fretboard?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 1, 2015,
#8
Quote by Sean0913
Here are a couple of Staff Reading Lessons I published in 2009 that have helped a great many people.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/throw_the_boy_down_the_well.html

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/throw_the_boy_down_the_well_part_2.html

Hope they help.

Best,

Sean


It amazes me that you're only the second person I've ever met so far that looks at the whole FACE thing this way. Why it isn't mainstream (at least in English speaking countries), I don't know.
#9
Quote by Vlasco
It amazes me that you're only the second person I've ever met so far that looks at the whole FACE thing this way. Why it isn't mainstream (at least in English speaking countries), I don't know.
^weird? (not you... me), that is the way (Seans method) I self taught myself to learn the notes... just kinda jumped out at me (never really considered another way)... good to have it confirmed as valid!!
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
^ What's wrong with using your knowledge of scales and chords and whatever to help? That's why you learn them, so that you don't need to think.

Or is the problem that you can't find the correct notes on your fretboard?


Knowing the scales is great. It makes changing keys on guitar 1000 times easier. But when I see am F# on the sheet, I don't correlate that with a particular fret in my mind. Since the scales can transpose so easily, I think in terms of scales instead of notes. It's very useful for improvisation, but not for reading.
Does that make sense? I'm not sure if I'm explaining it well.

The main point is that I'm just looking for recommendations on exercises that can be engaging. I find that when I'm trying to remember that the sixth fret on the G string is a C#, etc, it can get tedious.
#11
Quote by Leafs_fan_37
Knowing the scales is great. It makes changing keys on guitar 1000 times easier. But when I see am F# on the sheet, I don't correlate that with a particular fret in my mind. Since the scales can transpose so easily, I think in terms of scales instead of notes. It's very useful for improvisation, but not for reading.
Does that make sense? I'm not sure if I'm explaining it well.

The main point is that I'm just looking for recommendations on exercises that can be engaging. I find that when I'm trying to remember that the sixth fret on the G string is a C#, etc, it can get tedious.


So it sounds like you are looking for a faster way to identify or recall or find Notes on the Neck of a guitar? Is that correct?

Best,

Sean
#12
Quote by Vlasco
It amazes me that you're only the second person I've ever met so far that looks at the whole FACE thing this way. Why it isn't mainstream (at least in English speaking countries), I don't know.


I don't know, but for some reason my whole teaching career has been marked by deviating away from "the way things are traditionally taught and explained". Yet another example of that. I'm just happy that the way I wrote this out, has been helpful to people.

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by Leafs_fan_37
Knowing the scales is great. It makes changing keys on guitar 1000 times easier. But when I see am F# on the sheet, I don't correlate that with a particular fret in my mind. Since the scales can transpose so easily, I think in terms of scales instead of notes. It's very useful for improvisation, but not for reading.
Does that make sense? I'm not sure if I'm explaining it well.

The main point is that I'm just looking for recommendations on exercises that can be engaging. I find that when I'm trying to remember that the sixth fret on the G string is a C#, etc, it can get tedious.



re: reading/finding notes...I look for the highest and lowest notes in a passage-several bars--and determine the position/direction-up or down the fretboard-I need to be playing in..so for me learning scales/arps in all positions and keys was a tremendous help in learning the fretboard and more important the intervals in every scale and their relationships..at some point "thinking" of where each note is disappears and you begin to see whole sections of the fretboard at a time instead of single notes..unless there are extreme interval/octave jumps..most melodic passages will have notes within a several fret range and in a single key..you begin to see that you can play the passage in one position and all the notes are within your reach..

I suggest..learn scale positions in all keys...and within each position learn melodic patterns-(there are several hundred of em- Ex-1 3 7 1-of each degree of the scale) of the scale in that position..this will reinforce the position and muscle memory of notes with each scale in each position..yes this will take some time..but the effort will be more than rewarded
play well

wolf
#14
Quote by Sean0913
So it sounds like you are looking for a faster way to identify or recall or find Notes on the Neck of a guitar? Is that correct?

Best,

Sean

That would be one aspect of it. I think that I can learn that, and I already do know it quite well. I would be looking for just some exercises to practise it.

Quote by wolflen
re: reading/finding notes...I look for the highest and lowest notes in a passage-several bars--and determine the position/direction-up or down the fretboard-I need to be playing in..so for me learning scales/arps in all positions and keys was a tremendous help in learning the fretboard and more important the intervals in every scale and their relationships
I suggest..learn scale positions in all keys...and within each position learn melodic patterns-


Looking at the range of a passage is great advice. Tab already shows this but it's not on the staff. I'll keep that in mind.

Re: Scales
I do practise scales, maybe not as often as I should but I play a lot of blues so I think that I know them well (major and minor, also pentatonic).
Maybe I should look into some resources just showing scale exercises for different keys?

Also, thanks guys for the advice so far.