#1
Can someone show me how to notate this chord:

The instructions are as follows:
Using the middle finger twist the E and A strings together on the 6th fret, while at the same time fretting the G on the D string using the index finger, then fretting the F one the B string using the third finger, and using the pinky, fretting the open harmonic on the 7th fret of the G string. The high e string is played open.
The entire chord is to be played using rasgueado for the duration of 1 second. Played very rapidly at first but gradually slowing down.
#2
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Can someone show me how to notate this chord:

The instructions are as follows:
Using the middle finger twist the E and A strings together on the 6th fret, while at the same time fretting the G on the D string using the index finger, then fretting the F one the B string using the third finger, and using the pinky, fretting the open harmonic on the 7th fret of the G string. The high e string is played open.
The entire chord is to be played using rasgueado for the duration of 1 second. Played very rapidly at first but gradually slowing down.


This is one way.


  E A D G B E
            o  
5 | | 1 | | |
  2-2 | | 3 |
7 | | |<4>| |



Unless you were asking something else?
#3
Actually, that's pretty good. But I was thinking more along the lines of standard notation.
#4
What do you mean by "twist the strings together"?

If you meant barring them, then the only "special" notation would be a º to indicate the harmonic on the G (you'd notate it as a D since it's a natural harmonic, even though it sounds as G).
Last edited by cdgraves at Jun 26, 2015,
#6
This is something I've seen Eric Johnson do. but it's actually using the "tip" of the finger (no hyper extension) to hold down two notes. It's a finesse move where you actually have your index in the gap between the adjacent strings with just enough contact on the two strings themselves. It takes practice, but it's not that far out of reach, and can be a versatile skill, opening up for some interesting chord voicings.

So that fingering as shown above is right, but try it with the tip of the finger as opposed to any "jazzy" hyperextension and using the pad.

Best,

Sean
#7
Golden post the answer cuz it's crazy and people don't know about badass string twisting. Or dynamics.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
I'll do it tonight. I'm still convinced there is a better way to notate it, because it'll look like rubbish again once I add some Berio Sequenza XI style right hand bridge tapping to it. Btw that guy couldn't notate for guitar at all.
#9
So after another day of thought I finally solved the rest of the problems that I had. This is the result. At first I thought about using multiple voices, but it left me feeling like I could improve it. The string twist will be added as part of the extended techniques in nomenclature page of the score.



Any suggestions for improvements? I'm all ears.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Jun 27, 2015,
#10
I approve.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
gold..thats pretty cool..saw that twist technique long ago..the effect was a percussive drum roll type thing for a military marching band..I never thought of how you would "write" it..and now I know..question though...are the "reverse" horse-shoe symbols in the notation lexicon??
play well

wolf
#12
Quote by wolflen
gold..thats pretty cool..saw that twist technique long ago..the effect was a percussive drum roll type thing for a military marching band..I never thought of how you would "write" it..and now I know..question though...are the "reverse" horse-shoe symbols in the notation lexicon??


You're right that's exactly the type of sound it creates. I also saw it long ago used by a Chinese guitarist. He used it to imitate a Chinese percussion instrument.
The actual horse shoe symbol is not in the lexicon. But since you're allowed to invent notation for pretty much anything not standard, this is what I'm using. Although you do need to include a nomenclature page with notes detailing the symbol and how to execute the technique in the score.
I've been looking at a few modern guitar scores lately to see if I could find one already used, but not to my avail. You might possibly find one in a Helmut Lachenmann score, however I couldn't get my hands on the his guitar works. You might have a better luck though.
#14
What are the circled numbers? Also I don't like the sounding pitch of the harmonics in brackets. It adds an unnecessary detail to something already obviously complex. And I'd put the fingering indication by the harmonic not the sounding pitch because that's where it's being fingered.
#15
For the D harmonic which is in the 7th position, the sounding is as you say unnecessary. But I have more obscure ones later, so I'm testing out different methods of putting them down.
The circled numbers are string numbers. Not entirely necessary either, but a bitch of a chord to finger so I put them in for now.

Edit: Oops, I completely forgot to add VII to the harmonic.

Cdgraves, I probably could use the half barre indication but definitely not the bend. It already has its owni meaning.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Jun 28, 2015,