#1
I am really a noob on scales and i couldn't find anything about this.I made a song but now im stuck so i want to know which scale i am playing to know what i am doing and get help from it.These are the notes i use;

A E C B F G G#D

If you could help me with naming this scale i'd be so happy
#2
1. Disregard the melody.
2. Order the notes.
A B C D E F G G#

Quite honestly, it looks like A minor with the harmonic G# used in an E major (dominant function) chord.

3. Put the melody back together.

This is what I came up with:

M = melody
H = harmony
A = alternate
M: A  E | C  B | F  G | G#  D
H: Am   | C    | F    | E7
A:      | Am   | Dm   | G#dim

Having said that, it's your song, make whatever you want from it! This is more common practice.
#3
Quote by MetalSpawn at #33474969
I am really a noob on scales and i couldn't find anything about this.I made a song but now im stuck so i want to know which scale i am playing to know what i am doing and get help from it.These are the notes i use;

A E C B F G G#D

If you could help me with naming this scale i'd be so happy



It's hard to tell without context but it's easiest to just call it an A minor scale with a chromatic passing tone (G#)
#4
Quote by MeGaDeth2314
It's hard to tell without context but it's easiest to just call it an A minor scale with a chromatic passing tone (G#)


That's a chord tone. Passing tone has a destination. My ear leads me to a half cadence in this example, if such a thing is even relevant here.
#5
I just call it music
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#6
Quote by cdgraves at #33475330
That's a chord tone. Passing tone has a destination. My ear leads me to a half cadence in this example, if such a thing is even relevant here.



it's not a chord tone unless there is a chord being played underneath it and G# is one of the notes in the chord, which TS didn't specify. He simply gave us a series of notes and I arranged them in ascending order. The passing tone would be the G# because it's not in the A natural minor scale, and it leads to the A.


You could be right if the final chord is an E7, but for all we know TS could just want an A minor underneath the entire thing.

Quote by Baby Joel at #33475621
I just call it music


thanks babby this is extremely helpful
Last edited by MeGaDeth2314 at Jun 29, 2015,
#7
Hang on there gents.

1. It's not a chord tone unless it is TREATED as a chord tone. This doesn't necessarily mean there needs to be a chord underneath, only implied linear harmony in which the G# (or G) is behaving as a chord tone.

2. Something cannot be IN harmonic, melodic, or natural minor. The music is just IN a minor key, and the three forms of the scale can be drawn from at will.

So yeah, to answer OP:

You are most likely in the key of A minor, and have either:

1. A little harmonic minor action thrown in.
2. A little chromatic action thrown in.
3. Both.

(Post it and we'll know for sure cough cough)
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
Quote by MeGaDeth2314


thanks babby this is extremely helpful

any time
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#9
Quote by MeGaDeth2314
it's not a chord tone unless there is a chord being played underneath it and G# is one of the notes in the chord, which TS didn't specify. He simply gave us a series of notes and I arranged them in ascending order. The passing tone would be the G# because it's not in the A natural minor scale, and it leads to the A.


You could be right if the final chord is an E7, but for all we know TS could just want an A minor underneath the entire thing.


thanks babby this is extremely helpful



All things considered, I give it a 99% chance the tension is meant to imply or reference a harmony that typically includes the leading tone.