#1
Hey guys.

I've been playing guitar for a little over 4 years now and I must say that I realized that I don't know too many chords outside the majors, minors, major sevenths and minor sevenths. I do however know them in a atleast 3-4 ways each (the correct word is 'voicing' i think).

On occasion I do learn a few new 'exotic' chords which might be required for some song that I have to play live but other than, don't really know too many chords. I sometimes sit and discover new chords while practicing which some jazz-educated friends of mine notice and tell me about.

I partly attribute this to the fact that I didn't require to use them too much but also because I happened to concentrate on lead playing much more than rhythm. I got heavily into progressive metal and have been enjoying 'technical' stuff for more than two years and now that I find myself writing music I'm lacking knowledge of how to get the more interesting sounding chords.

So, now I ask you, how do I proceed to expand that library of chords? Especially if I plan to write progressive metal and similar stuff?

I could download a chords chart but it just overwhelms me and I don't know where to start.
Quote by slapsymcdougal
No, I judge people based on how similar they are to me.
The greater the similarity, the more of a total ****ing **** they are.


Metal is like an apple. Everything is good except for the core
Last edited by shawnkenneth at Jun 29, 2015,
#2
I love chords WOOOOO!

I got this. Get ready. In semi order of importance:

The Triads

Major
Minor
Diminished
Aug (if you want go for it)

The 7th chords

Maj7
Min7
Dom7
m7b5
Dim7

The "easy" extended voicings

Maj9
min9
Dom9
Dom13
Maj6/9
m6
9sus4 (Fmaj7/G)
7b9
7#9
Maj7#11
m11

etc, etc, there's many.

Enharmonic reinterpretation of primary 7th chords:

See the most recent Jet Talks Jazz. You master that, you "win" an entire area of guitar playing.

BUT TO ACTUALLY ANSWER YOUR QUESTION LOL:

-The trick isn't so much in amassing a massive mental library of chords. The trick is to learn how harmony works, and how to extend chords appropriately, and then to just do it; instead of rehashing a bunch of stock voicings, you want to manipulate harmony in real time, if that makes any kind of sense.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#3
I get what you mean. I actually do know how harmony works to a certain extent since I'm also trained in classical piano a bit.

I picked up the guitar and never applied any of my piano theory to the guitar because I wanted this part of my musical journey to be 'mine'. I guess I'll revisit that old stuff and extend chords instead of learning each chord individually.
Quote by slapsymcdougal
No, I judge people based on how similar they are to me.
The greater the similarity, the more of a total ****ing **** they are.


Metal is like an apple. Everything is good except for the core
#4
The question is, are you just learning shapes that you know happen to make particular chords, or are you actually learning the theory behind them?
#5
Pianists have a massive advantage over guitarists in most aspects of comping, it'd be worth translating some of the skills. I talk about this a bit in that Jet Talks Jazz.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
The question is, are you just learning shapes that you know happen to make particular chords, or are you actually learning the theory behind them?


As far as theory is concerned I only applied a little of my previous piano knowledge to the guitar such as:

Major chords are formed with the root, third and fifth
minor chords are formed with the root, minor third and fifth
7th chords are formed with the major triad and a minor seventh
I get each minor 7th chord by 'lifting' up a finger on the A minor chord shape on the guitar


In my understanding, how i approach chords is start off a basic shape then modify certain notes to get the chord I want. This is how I experiment with chords and come across new interesting sounding chords.

But yes, my guitar playing has been to a huge extent, mechanical. Also, to be honest, I don't think I've reached that level where I can construct chords on the guitar as per my need as yet because I still have to learn all the notes on the fretboard well enough to recognize them as soon as I look at them.

I think I should work on that first.
Quote by slapsymcdougal
No, I judge people based on how similar they are to me.
The greater the similarity, the more of a total ****ing **** they are.


Metal is like an apple. Everything is good except for the core
Last edited by shawnkenneth at Jun 29, 2015,
#7
Quote by shawnkenneth


In my understanding, how i approach chords is start off a basic shape then modify certain notes to get the chord I want. This is how I experiment with chords and come across new interesting sounding chords.


Nothing wrong with that approach since it's useful as hell. What you need to understand is what happens when you move a finger. Let's say that you grab a C major shape, putting your index onto the third fret and your middle, ring and pinky on the fifth frets of D, G and B strings. If you move your middle finger, you alter the fifth. If you move your ring finger the most common thing to do is to add a seventh, and when moving your pinky you're altering the third and possibly creating a suspended chord. So, to create let's say a maj7sus2b5 (a completely redundant and theoretical chord name by the way, if someone knows a better name go ahead and correct me), you need to move your middle and ring fingers down a fret and lift your pinky.

This is of course only half of the approach, since you really need to know what you're doing. It gets harder with extended and especially with altered chords. The latest Jet Talks Jazz really explains a great technique for this so Jet's self advertisement actually has a valid point. But prepare to spend quite some time getting this down, at least on the level Jet is proposing in his thread.
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Theory: Not rules, just tools.

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*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here