#1
Do you ever hear a new song that you really like and you just can't wait to learn it on guitar and then after you spend hours learning it it almost seems ruined? Like now when you hear that song you know exactly whats going on because you've heard it 8 million times during practice, and it almost loses its appeal. Does anybody else feel afraid to learn their favorite songs because of this? Just thinking out loud.
#2
No.

It usually makes me like the song more.

Are you a glass half empty kind of guy?
Si
#3
I see OP's point, and it has happened to me, but only on songs that are pretty easy to begin with, and never to an extent where I'd start disliking the song. So I guess I know where OP is coming from but I haven't had the problem in a long time.
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#4
I remember I'd sometimes learn a song and think "Is that it? Is it that simple?" but that just increased my admiration and excitement.
Si
#5
It depends on the song. Some songs that I learn seem to be so masterfully crafted and learning the piece only brings all the little details to light, and I gain a much greater appreciation for them. Other times, especially when I used to play electric guitar, I'd finish learning the song and go "wow that's it?" or I just end up getting tired of the song. I once heard someone say that music is like magic, beauty without reason. We don't know what's going on and it mesmerizes us, but in some cases, when we learn how the song/magic trick works, the illusion is broken and there is nothing to be amazed at any more. It's the same reason why musicians never listen to their own songs.
#6
i mean if you sit and actually analyze a song, even on a subconscious level, you're going to grow as a musician and listener. if it's bad music and you prior didn't realize it, it might ruin the music

so don't listen to bad music
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#7
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It depends on the song. Some songs that I learn seem to be so masterfully crafted and learning the piece only brings all the little details to light, and I gain a much greater appreciation for them. Other times, especially when I used to play electric guitar, I'd finish learning the song and go "wow that's it?" or I just end up getting tired of the song. I once heard someone say that music is like magic, beauty without reason. We don't know what's going on and it mesmerizes us, but in some cases, when we learn how the song/magic trick works, the illusion is broken and there is nothing to be amazed at any more. It's the same reason why musicians never listen to their own songs.


I do think that most musicians actually do listen to their own music. If not they play it.
#9
Quote by liampje
I do think that most musicians actually do listen to their own music. If not they play it.


yeah, after playing the same 10-15 songs for 2 years straight i'm sure most musicians love listening to their own recordings
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#10
Quote by Hail
yeah, after playing the same 10-15 songs for 2 years straight i'm sure most musicians love listening to their own recordings


Exactly, I imagine the people who listen to their own music are the same people who love the sound of their own voice, or scream their own name during sex.
#11
This is sort of going a different direction but I've never been able to really break out of just learning covers, I have a really hard time being creative and sometimes when I learn a cover its almost discouraging because I'm like how in the world did someone just sit down one day and come up with this. A good musician brings every note he/she plays to life and I can't seem to produce the same effect.
#12
Quote by ryane24
This is sort of going a different direction but I've never been able to really break out of just learning covers, I have a really hard time being creative and sometimes when I learn a cover its almost discouraging because I'm like how in the world did someone just sit down one day and come up with this. A good musician brings every note he/she plays to life and I can't seem to produce the same effect.

Are you trying to be creative? Or aren't you?

I've seen a vid from Steve Vai's masterclass. He explains that most of his unique stuff happened from trial and error (duuh, how are you going to invent new art without trial and error.) Pretty much anything (even rocket science, chemistry all the things you wouldn't expect to) are largely based on trial and error. Ofcourse you can try and predict new stuff that will work. But the best thing is, you will and have to fail before finding something good.

Take a standard phrase you got. Take the tapping pattern of Van Halen's Eruption for example. It's all flying notes of the same value. So no rhythmic variation.

Put on a backing track tap the arpeggio's of the chords in the backing (it works best over static backing tracks, because then you don't have to think a lot about what notes to hit.)

Say you just know the tapping pattern from Eruption. All you can do is that pattern. If you want to come up with something original from that pattern, just start playing the arpeggio. Listen to how it sounds, empty your mind and just try to do some silly shit, make the rhythm more interesting, put in some rests, try some slides with the right hand, try something idk it will come by itself.

If you really want to be creative, try to think of at least 1 thing a day that you haven't seen or heard anyone else do. It can be a riff, a tapping lick, sweeps, whatever.
#13
If you ever watch the Classic Album video for the making of Steely Dan's "Asia" album, I think it's Larry Carlton who says that once the band was assembled for a particular song they would rehearse and play a song over and over for hours until they were just bored with it. At that point they all can play the song perfectly but the band starts showing signs of fatigue and boredom.

At that point they would take an hour or so break and have lunch or dinner hang out a bit goof off then get back in the studio to record the song. Now the bands real creative nature starts to creep into the song. Everyone is relaxed because they know the tune inside and out and no one is worrying about making mistakes so they start to get to the real emotional heart of the song and not just trying to play it correctly. When you have learned a song that well you can really get creative.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jun 30, 2015,
#14
^This.

Understanding ruins nothing. Complacency, however, does.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#15
The only thing that ruins a cover is John Mayer or Maroon 5 playing them.
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#17
Quote by 20Tigers
No.

It usually makes me like the song more.

Are you a glass half empty kind of guy?


+1

though let's not lump pessimism in with it.
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