#1
You have been warned...

Can I run a Peavey 6505+ head (120 watts of all tube metal bliss) through a 1x12 cab safely...? What would be the minimum? Or are there any tricks I could use to get by? Like using a volume pedal in the effects loop or something so I can lower the volume and still get the amps tone?
Quote by Roc8995
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Quote by dannyalcatraz
Style is in the hands. Taste is in the hands. But tone? Tone is in the gear.
#2
If the speaker is 120 watts you will have no issues. If the speaker is lower wattage you can still run the head through it, but be very careful of your volume or you will destroy the speaker(and possibly the amp). I sometimes run my 100watt marshall into a 60watt 2x12 with no issues, but the volume stays pretty reasonable.
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Last edited by Robbgnarly at Jul 1, 2015,
#3
As long as the speaker can handle the wattage and the impedance matches (which I think the 6505 can handle 16, 8 or 4 ohms), you'll be fine.
#4
OK people, let's see what speakers we can think of that will take a 6505 head. I'll kick it off:

Eminence Legend V1216 or V128
Celestion G12K100 (100 W speaker but it will take it)
Electrovoice EVM-12L
The 100W Scumbacks should hold up OK too.

OK guys. Shoot!
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#5
The amp power rating is a maximum rating.
Watts and volume aren't in a linear relationship, so if you double the watts (from 50 to 100 for example) you're only going to get about 3 db of volume change. So 25 watts is going to sound closer to the volume level of 100 watts than it would to the perceived volume level of 3 watts.
Get it? 25 Is closer to 100 than it is to 3.

If you run too much power into your speaker then you might damage the speaker. If your speaker coil opens up then your amp can get damaged. Tubes don't like it when there's no speaker hooked up. Solid state wouldn't care, but tubes do care.
#6
you need twice as much wattage in the speaker as what your amp puts out clean.

a 100 watt speaker should be safe for the peavey if you aren't diming it but a higher wattage speaker would be safer.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#7
Quote by AcousticMirror
you need twice as much wattage in the speaker as what your amp puts out clean.

a 100 watt speaker should be safe for the peavey if you aren't diming it but a higher wattage speaker would be safer.


Rarely do I disagree with you but well...I disagree with you.

Speakers are rated at continuous input power and it's a near certainty that an amp won't put out anything even approaching clean rated power on a regular basis, even if it's cranked. Even if we presume that a tube amp can spike to double the rated power during very intermittent transients, a 100w speaker from a reputable company will be able to handle a 100w amp.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
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#8
Quote by Arby911
Rarely do I disagree with you but well...I disagree with you.

Speakers are rated at continuous input power and it's a near certainty that an amp won't put out anything even approaching clean rated power on a regular basis, even if it's cranked. Even if we presume that a tube amp can spike to double the rated power during very intermittent transients, a 100w speaker from a reputable company will be able to handle a 100w amp.


the issue is that tube amps are "rated" at nearly the limits of their clean power and their power output increases significantly above that even if the amp doesn't seem much louder.

Clean headroom is also reached a lot sooner then people think since the sine wave reading used for measurement is much cleaner then what our ears can perceive.

Most 100 watt amps are putting out 100 watts already at around 3 or 4 on the master volume.

Now most speakers are rated conservatively so most 100 watt speakers on the market can probably handle something like 150 watts but I would not risk it for anything other then bedroom practicing.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#9
Quote by AcousticMirror
the issue is that tube amps are "rated" at nearly the limits of their clean power and their power output increases significantly above that even if the amp doesn't seem much louder.

Clean headroom is also reached a lot sooner then people think since the sine wave reading used for measurement is much cleaner then what our ears can perceive.

Most 100 watt amps are putting out 100 watts already at around 3 or 4 on the master volume.

Now most speakers are rated conservatively so most 100 watt speakers on the market can probably handle something like 150 watts but I would not risk it for anything other then bedroom practicing.


I'll concede all that, but output wattage is a function of input signal, and the signal from a guitar can hardly be said to be consistent.

It would be an interesting experiment to play several songs through a cranked amp and measure the output to calculate the average power. (I suppose you could do it with just the guitar signal, calculate the average input signal and go from there.)

I just don't think you would reach the maximum dissipation threshold for a 100w speaker using a 100w amp on average, which is all we need to be concerned about.

But yeah, I'm not taking the chance at a gig either...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#10
Quote by Cathbard
OK people, let's see what speakers we can think of that will take a 6505 head. I'll kick it off:

Eminence Legend V1216 or V128
Celestion G12K100 (100 W speaker but it will take it)
Electrovoice EVM-12L
The 100W Scumbacks should hold up OK too.

OK guys. Shoot!


Eminence Delta 12 and Delta Pro 12

Both rated at 400w RMS and the pro is supposedly an EVM clone but thought I would mention them as they are pretty wallet friendly in comparison to the EVM
#11
You guys are freakin awesome. Thanks for the help!
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, and people still got polio and you had to crank your car up by hand and put whale oil in the lamps every night.

Things are better now.


Quote by dannyalcatraz
Style is in the hands. Taste is in the hands. But tone? Tone is in the gear.
#12
Eminence Swamp Thangs are rated @ 150 watts, and sound awesome with 6505s. Plus, they are one of the most efficient (loudest) speakers I've ever heard, so you won't be tempted to turn up the volume quite so high. They're louder than hell.
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Last edited by KailM at Jul 2, 2015,
#13
You could always pull two tubes so that the amp is running at 60 watts, which would make it much easier.
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#14
Quote by Cathbard
OK people, let's see what speakers we can think of that will take a 6505 head. I'll kick it off:

Eminence Legend V1216 or V128
Celestion G12K100 (100 W speaker but it will take it)
Electrovoice EVM-12L
The 100W Scumbacks should hold up OK too.

OK guys. Shoot!


I've used the Eminence Delta Pro 12A.
You'll find it in their Pro Audio listings, but it's a great guitar speaker.



It'll handle 200 - 400W (depending on the cabinet) with good efficiency and most of the same characteristics as the EVM-12L at about $110 or so.

They LOVE those Mesa Thiele cabinets (build your own from the EV plans or contact one of the folks who will build them for you in raw wood (paint them with Duratex or LineX) or tolexed):