#1
I know the speaker isn't blown cause the highs miss and generally lows sound good but if I turn up the bass too.much the cabinet makes a sound as if it's being choked or something. I have a ibanez tbx150h 150 watt head and a crate 100 watt cab. I could possibly be getting a Marshall 1960a cabinet that is 300 watts. would the upgrading change it? I would imagine that the low end of the head is too much for the cab and it ends up just choking cause too.much is being pushed through it but any help would be awesome ! This head is amazing but I'm missing those low ends and it's sucking quite a bit of tone from the overall sound.
#3
Quote by ratsrelow
would the upgrading change it?
Probably.
The way to be sure would be to go into a musical instruments store and plug your head into another cab and see if you encounter the same problem.

Or you may simply have damaged the head by turning up the volume too much - it's a bad idea to run a 150w head into a 100w cab at high volumes.
Quote by ratsrelow
This head is amazing but I'm missing those low ends and it's sucking quite a bit of tone from the overall sound.
You say you missed meaning that these speakers were once able to reproduce the bass you wanted?

In that case you ****ed the speakers.
Name's Luca.

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#4
well no. I haven't gotten the bass I wanted but up to some point the bass just wrecks the cabinet. if I turn the bass down it hits hard with high volume but if I turn the.bass up with high volume it breaks up and just vibrates. then if I dint the volume down it sounds like crap
#5
It might just be a loose baffle. If a baffle isn’t installed well it will resonate and that sounds like dog shit. See if holding the baffle kills the bad sound, and if it does you need to fix the mounting.
#6
Lots of possibilities.

Speakers have limits on how much wattage and bass energy they can handle. If you exceed these limits you will damage the speakers. Maybe you are just clipping the amp by turning up the bass too much. Clipping sounds choked and ugly. Broken speakers sound choked and ugly when turned up. Maybe find a speaker cab designed to do what you want to do? Get the right tool for the job.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
so trying a 300 watt cab would a good start? I understand what you were saying about clipping with the lows. it I have a feeling it's clipping too early because of the wattage. I just learned that the guy I got my cab from put eminence and screaming eagles I'm it which is probably my problem too. what would you say?
#8
Quote by ratsrelow
so trying a 300 watt cab would a good start? I understand what you were saying about clipping with the lows. it I have a feeling it's clipping too early because of the wattage. I just learned that the guy I got my cab from put eminence and screaming eagles I'm it which is probably my problem too. what would you say?

Eminence makes lots of speakers and the screaming Eagles are like their name implies, very mid and high frequency rangespeakers, not lows. so that is probably the issue
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#9
okay thanks will try to get my hands on something more bass oriented and try that. plus look for more watt in case that's the issue too. I'm positive I want either a mesa or a Marshall but Idk quite yet. I would love to get more of a chug without the needless vibration that doesn't bring good sound. but a sound that has articulation and nice miss to give an aggressive punch in the face tone. this is why I love ug though. so helpful
#10
Quote by ratsrelow
so trying a 300 watt cab would a good start?


Not necessarily.

There are a lot of reasons why bass wouldn't be doing well in your rig.

One is that the cabinet and the speakers weren't designed for it. Most guitar speakers begin to drop off rapidly below about 110Hz. Some will be rated to handle 80Hz but not deliver.

Two is that you don't have enough power in your amp to produce solid bass, particularly at gigging volumes. The joke has always been with a Marshall stack that as you turn up the volume, the bass drops away. For traditional guitarists, who mostly worked in the midranges, that wasn't a problem. For modern guitarists working in the lower ranges, it is.

Three, you have your controls set badly for producing clean, tight bass. Sometimes cranking up the bass simply wastes power on frequencies that you can't hear, and what's left "farts out."

Four, your cabinet itself is poorly constructed for bass, or it's damaged.

The cures:
One, a 4x12 cabinet was never designed to produce solid bass. There ARE some that do, but they're designated bass cabinets. Modern cabinets are available that not only reproduce bass well, but that are lighter, handle much more power. I'm using cabinets that house a 15" LF driver, a 6.5" mids driver and a 1" tweeter. They handle up to 900W but, more importantly, they'll easily go down to 35Hz without "farting out." I run them with a relatively cheap power amp of around 1500W.

Two -- get more power. It takes FAR more power to reproduce bass cleanly than it does to produce midrange, and the speakers have to move about four times more air than it took to reproduce the same note at the same volume as one an octave above.

Three -- IF you have the right speakers and IF you have enough power, don't waste that power by dialing UP your bass control. Most bass players use a filter that cuts OFF bass below a certain point to prevent the amp from wasting power trying to reproduce notes that aren't audlble. You'll find that most of your guitar's "bass" sounds can be reinforced by changing how you EQ things.

Four -- you need a cabinet that's air tight and that's properly braced. If you have a 4x12, for example, that doesn't have an adequate center brass, that back panel is going to flap around, wasting power and producing random rattles that have nothing to do with bass. Cabinets that are not properly braced (for bass) will sometimes "oilcan." The sides and back (and baffle) will waste bass power by dissipating it internally.