#1
I have a 2013 Gibson LPJ and have had it for less then a year and I noticed that when I bend the strings on most frets of every string, no matter what gauge strings I use, makes a squealingish noise, and not a pinch harmonic type squeal. Is this just something like that I am not bending in the proper way?
#2
Is the action low? If it is the string might not be clearing the higher frets so you'd need to raise the action slightly
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Dressing my steak with cum is just adding more protein to my steak.


Quote by Roc8995
The Hello Kitty Strat is the most metal guitar known to man.
#4
I'm with DC - sounds like you may need a setup.
Quote by Invader Jim
The questions people ask here makes me wonder how the TS's dress themselves in the morning and can shower without drowning...
#5
Quote by 'DC fan
Is the action low? If it is the string might not be clearing the higher frets so you'd need to raise the action slightly

Thank you that seems to be what is happening I had a problem when I changed the string the very first time where the action was very low and I had raised it but it probably wasn't enough. Do you think it would be good to take it up to a guitar center to fix it?
#6
Quote by mtyler1121
Thank you that seems to be what is happening I had a problem when I changed the string the very first time where the action was very low and I had raised it but it probably wasn't enough. Do you think it would be good to take it up to a guitar center to fix it?


I'd avoid Guitar Denter's rolling stock of techs if you have other options (as in other, better techs to take it to). LPJs were one of Gibson's cheapest ever guitars, and were pretty much slapped together with far less attention to detail than any $200 Korean guitar. They sold only because they have "Gibson" on the headstock. The finish is nearly none-existent and wears quickly, the frets weren't well finished and the pickups on a lot of them are designed to be the cheapest things Gibson could produce.

That said, a bit of cash and some tech love can turn them into a pretty decently-playing guitar. The first thing you need to do is have a tech find the frets that aren't level and fix the problem. This can range anywhere from a couple of frets that need work to a full fret level and crown. He may also need to adjust the nut slots and the rest of the setup. But getting the frets level is your primary mission.

Decide what gauge of strings you like (I'd suggest settling on 9's or 10's) and stick with one gauge and one brand for a while. This prevents the guitar's neck from changing with different strings. I buy cheap strings (GHS Boomers, in my case, but that's not an endorsement for that brand) and change them often. My most-used guitars rarely last more than a month before I swap strings. Do what you like, but settle on just one so that it's no longer a factor in your setup woes.

Keep your guitar in its case/bag when you're not actually playing it and wipe it down thoroughly after use. That guitar has very little protection from sweat, moisture, etc. Keeping it on a stand or hanger exposes those strings to a lot more corrosive air/moisture and the wood to a lot of rapid humidity and temperature changes. Keeping it in the bag or case reduces the speed at which those changes take place.

When you get the money, you might also have your frets superglued. You'll have to find a tech who is comfortable with the process: http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Neck_Building_and_Repair_and_Setup/Super_glue_your_frets_for_better_tone.html This article promotes it as a route to better tone (I've found that it DOES help eliminate "dead" frets), but more importantly, it helps eliminate "flyer" frets that can appear during stretches of low humidity when the fretboard shrinks.
#7
I have heard something like this on some guitars when the frets are very flat on their tops and not crowned correctly, and very smooth (mirror-like) because they remained like that for some time. In my case it was a metal-on-metal squeak. Crowning the frets eliminated it. Maybe this is what you are experiencing.
#8
Quote by dspellman
I'd avoid Guitar Denter's rolling stock of techs if you have other options (as in other, better techs to take it to). LPJs were one of Gibson's cheapest ever guitars, and were pretty much slapped together with far less attention to detail than any $200 Korean guitar. They sold only because they have "Gibson" on the headstock. The finish is nearly none-existent and wears quickly, the frets weren't well finished and the pickups on a lot of them are designed to be the cheapest things Gibson could produce.

That said, a bit of cash and some tech love can turn them into a pretty decently-playing guitar. The first thing you need to do is have a tech find the frets that aren't level and fix the problem. This can range anywhere from a couple of frets that need work to a full fret level and crown. He may also need to adjust the nut slots and the rest of the setup. But getting the frets level is your primary mission.

Decide what gauge of strings you like (I'd suggest settling on 9's or 10's) and stick with one gauge and one brand for a while. This prevents the guitar's neck from changing with different strings. I buy cheap strings (GHS Boomers, in my case, but that's not an endorsement for that brand) and change them often. My most-used guitars rarely last more than a month before I swap strings. Do what you like, but settle on just one so that it's no longer a factor in your setup woes.


Keep your guitar in its case/bag when you're not actually playing it and wipe it down thoroughly after use. That guitar has very little protection from sweat, moisture, etc. Keeping it on a stand or hanger exposes those strings to a lot more corrosive air/moisture and the wood to a lot of rapid humidity and temperature changes. Keeping it in the bag or case reduces the speed at which those changes take place.

When you get the money, you might also have your frets superglued. You'll have to find a tech who is comfortable with the process: http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Neck_Building_and_Repair_and_Setup/Super_glue_your_frets_for_better_tone.html This article promotes it as a route to better tone (I've found that it DOES help eliminate "dead" frets), but more importantly, it helps eliminate "flyer" frets that can appear during stretches of low humidity when the fretboard shrinks.

Thank you for that I will work on getting all of that done its a shame to hear that they are like that and priced around $1000 I think I got mine on sale for $500.Hopefully I can get it fixed soon.