Poll: Does you agree with dis here quote
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View poll results: Does you agree with dis here quote
Yessuh
12 24%
Nosuh
27 55%
Some other thing
10 20%
Voters: 49.
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#1
This is an axiom of Emerson's, allegedly, although I'm sure the idea is older than him.

Basically the idea is that you can educate yourself using available public resources and books to the same level or better than the university experience.

Notable and successful "intellectuals" who have stated agreement with this idea are Ralph Waldo Emerson (duh), Stefan Zweig, and Ray Bradbury. These are off the top of my head, and I'm sure there are others.

How do you feel about this?

I attend a university and take courses (LOL but it's online) and really enjoy the academic environment, but I also very highly value books, libraries, and other sources of open information. I think that, generally, both are equally viable, but suit different contexts, fields of study, and learning styles.

My God, it's full of stars!
#2
Depends on what degree you do

Good luck getting anywhere in STEM with no practical experience. Books can't teach you physical skills and good lab practise.

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#3
Depends on the subject.

Humanities, yes. Genetics, not so much.
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#4
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Depends on what degree you do

Good luck getting anywhere in STEM with no practical experience. Books can't teach you physical skills and good lab practise.


Maybe if you're a doofus

Tsiolkovsky is a great example
My God, it's full of stars!
#5
When it comes to non hands on trades ya. Tho teachers can certainly help depending on the student
#6
For what I am trying to do, definitely not

I mean I can learn most of the theoretical stuff I need to learn through books and even gets hands on experience in many different ways, but no way do I land a job in what I'm pursuing without at least a 4 year
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#8
Having been to college I'd agree that this is mostly the case. Obviously there are some specialty fields for which you will need access to labs and meticulous hands-on training. But lately I felt like I regretted not challenging myself more in math/science during uni. Then I was like, "Well, I can just get calculus and physics books."
#DTWD
#9
Quote by Dreadnought

That's a very, very short list, and doesn't compare to the number of those who would have got nowhere without a university education.
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#10
Sure if you just wanna learn. If you want a degree for the signaling value you gotta go to university.
#11
Quote by slapsymcdougal
That's a very, very short list, and doesn't compare to the number of those who would have got nowhere without a university education.


It's also not all-inclusive.

For the record, my question has nothing to do with job placement. That's lame
My God, it's full of stars!
#12
Something something Good Will Hunting.
Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


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#13
Taught myself Statistics out of a textbook I found at a yard sale last summer. Took the AP test for it and got a 5 (highest score they give). I've never gotten a 5 on any other AP test, and for all of those I was taught in a classroom setting.

Albeit math is 20x easier to score well in because it's all objective.
#14
universities are only necessary so that you can prove competence up to a certain employable standard in a given field of study. outdated institutions that are visibly broken tbh.
#15
College = reading books + writing papers

I read more books and wrote more papers in college than I would have if not for college. College was valuable.
#16
Quote by Dreadnought
It's also not all-inclusive.

For the record, my question has nothing to do with job placement. That's lame

Never said it was. What I mean by 'got nowhere' is in terms of the contribution made to their field of study, not their contribution to their own bank account.
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#17
School is good for dragging you kicking and screaming through all the shit you would rather not learn but that gives you good exposure in your field and others. But if you're motivated and capable of independently challenging yourself, school is a hindrance because the curriculum is boiled to down to basically have students jump through hoops rather than explore the material. Then there are also those courses which are nothing more than bullshit song and dance so you can get a credit without the prof putting in the time to teach anything of value.
Last edited by Godsmack_IV at Jul 4, 2015,
#19
Quote by Nero Galon
Something something Good Will Hunting.

It's not your fault.
#20
Nah, university is more than just paying for an old man to tell you stuff you could otherwise learn from books. But there is no university without books - I certainly think that books are undervalued and not used enough by professors in my faculty.

But with my field being Chemistry, there is a huge amount of practicum involved - not only is it very hard to actually learn lab work from reading, a lot of it is what my Organic Chem assistant calls 'chemical art' - stuff for which there is no guidebook for you to read about it, stuff which you just need to learn through trial and error.

Very much like all the log cabin construction videos I've been watching lately. Sure I can watch them over and over, memorize all the steps and read countless guides about it on the internet. But until I actually try to do it, get good with all the tools used and master all the steps, I'm just gonna suck at it regardless of how well I know the theory behind it.


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#22
Anyone who tells themselves that is a bit deluded I'd say
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#23
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Depends on the subject.

Humanities, yes. Genetics, not so much.


Well, if you're doing the typical 'lol art' thing then you would think that. Otherwise, no
Quote by ErikLensherr
Did you hear about the cockney Godfather?

He made them an offer they couldn't understand.
#24
I'm not a learner by reading. More by doing/interactive experience. So books kinda blow...

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#25
Quote by steve_muse
Well, if you're doing the typical 'lol art' thing then you would think that. Otherwise, no

There is no art except lol art.
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#26
I'm kinda torn on this.

I truly hate the academic setting. That is, the traditional sit-down-and-learn type. I prefer to learn by observation and practice from a professional who spends their time doing whatever it is I'm trying to learn. That's just how I learn most efficiently.

However, sometimes it isn't always clear where you should start, or what basic skills you should acquire, before going balls deep into a subject. I think that academia helps with that much.

On the whole I prefer learning things myself from active practice, and that suits my interests well enough (meteorology and such, obviously you shouldn't go cut open some strangers if you want to be a surgeon )


Attending post-secondary school to me would be more about the networking.
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Last edited by eGraham at Jul 4, 2015,
#27
Quote by eGraham
I'm kinda torn on this.

I truly hate the academic setting. That is, the traditional sit-down-and-learn type. I prefer to learn by observation and practice from a professional who spends their time doing whatever it is I'm trying to learn. That's just how I learn most efficiently.

However, sometimes it isn't always clear where you should start, or what basic skills you should acquire, before going balls deep into a subject. I think that academia helps with that much.

On the whole I prefer learning things myself from active practice, and that suits my interests well enough (meteorology and such, obviously you shouldn't go cut open some strangers if you want to be a surgeon )

I figured that out when I put them back together and there were bits left over.

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#28
Does it come with the numbers? Is it connect the dots?
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#29
Quote by eGraham
Does it come with the numbers? Is it connect the dots?

None of the ones I found had numbers.

Maybe they were defective.
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#30
Quote by Dreadnought
I attend a university and take courses (LOL but it's online) and really enjoy the academic environment, but I also very highly value books, libraries, and other sources of open information. I think that, generally, both are equally viable, but suit different contexts, fields of study, and learning styles


yeah
#31
you can learn about as much yeah

but the real world experience of many lecturers will always be better than books
#33
Quote by slapsymcdougal at #33484622
None of the ones I found had numbers.

Maybe they were defective.

That must be why they all died
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#34
good luck learning linear algebra on your own if you're not already a math genius.

honestly, the only courses i could see this working for are art/history/english type classes

the rest require actual class work, labs, and homework to instill the knowledge
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#35
^very naive to assume whole departments are easy to self-learn. You explain to me someone like Derrida without any aid and I'll stand corrected
Quote by ErikLensherr
Did you hear about the cockney Godfather?

He made them an offer they couldn't understand.
#36
University will teach you the bare minimum amount of knowledge you may need to not be entirely incompetent in modern-day industry. That's it. There's truly no sugarcoating it.

If you are truly passionate about something, a library will take you far; the internet and research papers will take you farther if you already have already academically disciplined yourself. That means going through rigor. If you're a new-age fucktard, then perhaps university will be good for you to understand what academic rigor genuinely means.

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#37
Quote by steve_muse
^very naive to assume whole departments are easy to self-learn. You explain to me someone like Derrida without any aid and I'll stand corrected

some french fgt idk who cares

The End
#38
Kudos for effort
Quote by ErikLensherr
Did you hear about the cockney Godfather?

He made them an offer they couldn't understand.
#39
Quote by Dreadnought
This is an axiom of Emerson's, allegedly, although I'm sure the idea is older than him.

Basically the idea is that you can educate yourself using available public resources and books to the same level or better than the university experience.

Notable and successful "intellectuals" who have stated agreement with this idea are Ralph Waldo Emerson (duh), Stefan Zweig, and Ray Bradbury. These are off the top of my head, and I'm sure there are others.

How do you feel about this?

I attend a university and take courses (LOL but it's online) and really enjoy the academic environment, but I also very highly value books, libraries, and other sources of open information. I think that, generally, both are equally viable, but suit different contexts, fields of study, and learning styles.


Apart from practical experience, you are entirely correct yes.

I do think that you need to have a clear idea on what the hell you are doing. An ability to quickly discover what is important and what is not, and what is true and what is not. Requires a lot of critical thinking.
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#40
Quote by k.lainad
good luck learning linear algebra on your own if you're not already a math genius.

honestly, the only courses i could see this working for are art/history/english type classes

the rest require actual class work, labs, and homework to instill the knowledge

I'd say Math is the one that's easy to learn alone. It requires literally 0 critical thinking. I'd say understanding the intricacies in Art/History/english requires a lot more debate and external input than understanding linear algebra (I have taught linear algebra this year).
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I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
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