#1
Hi all,

I have an old Fender Squier SA 100 dreadnought acoustic guitar with a broken nut. I need to replace the nut however I am unsure as to if there are specific nuts for it or if all are made to standard size.

For example, I can search on amazon for one and pick any random one but I wouldn't be sure as to if the length is correct or if the slots are the correct size for the strings.

Can anyone lend some assistance with this or point me in the correction direction ?
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#2
yeah there are specific sizes, You can measure the broken ones width and everything and it helps.

I was lucky on this acoustic I found in the trash I just got the cheapest bone nut on ebay possible and it works. Now I'm not going to play shows with it any time soon so I didn't care about touring the world with it.

Graphtech Tusq ones are the ones I recommend they come in black and white. Both of which for sure there is an acoustic one. All the measurements are there on the page and the customer support should be there too in case you have any questions. Brass and bone are excellent materials too. Most guitar shops should supply them if not graphtech.com i think is the website.. worst case scenario ebay.
#4
Quote by rock.freak667
Hi all,

I have an old Fender Squier SA 100 dreadnought acoustic guitar with a broken nut. I need to replace the nut however I am unsure as to if there are specific nuts for it or if all are made to standard size.

For example, I can search on amazon for one and pick any random one but I wouldn't be sure as to if the length is correct or if the slots are the correct size for the strings.

Can anyone lend some assistance with this or point me in the correction direction ?


i seriously doubt you are gonna find a direct replacement for that thing. you may consider buying a parts junker off of ebay just for the nut but most likely you'll probably end up making you own if there is no way for you to glue the thing back together temporarily. go here for materials, tools, and tech:

stewmac.com

lmii.com

frets.com

guitarsaddles.com

it's not that hard. you're in the tardis, you can figure it out.
Last edited by ad_works at Jul 6, 2015,
#5
Any specific type of file or sand paper to use? (coarseness and so on as all I might have access to is a metal file or emery paper).

Quote by ad_works

it's not that hard. you're in the tardis, you can figure it out.


I know!
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#6
Quote by rock.freak667
Any specific type of file or sand paper to use? (coarseness and so on as all I might have access to is a metal file or emery paper).

I know!


to do what? make one from scratch? while it is easy to do you still need tools. check out frets.com

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luthier/Technique/Setup/NewNut/newnut1.html
Last edited by ad_works at Jul 6, 2015,
#8
You can get nut blanks from just about any decent music store. Probably $5 or so. I like bone best. It's been working great for 100 years...and for an acoustic, you're not dealing with a floating tremolo and tuning issues.

Sandpaper - Start with about 80 grit if you have a lot of sanding to do, once you have it close to final size go to 180 then 400, I went to 600. put the sandpaper on a good flat surface and move the nut blank around on it, in straight lines, not circles, and turn it around frequently. You have a natural tendency to put more pressure on one end. when I did my Takamine I used up to 1200 grit for final polish.

Use a pencil or fine point sharpie to trace the original onto the blank. Use the original to get the string spacing too.

Nut slots are your biggest problem, nut files ain't cheap. If it were me I'd get everything else done and the nut mounted, then take it to a good guitar tech to have the slots cut. Probably less expensive than a set of nut files you'll use once every 10 years at best. Even working on other people's guitars I have only done a couple of nuts.

To mount it, use one drop of white Elmer's glue against the fretboard, NOT the bottom on the headstock. That makes it easy to remove, a tap with a wood block from the neck and it should pop right off and won't tear a chunk of wood off. Don't use super glue or wood glue. It takes very little to hold it in place. Mine has been solid for over 10 years with one small drop of Elmer's white glue against the vertical surface at the end of the fretboard.

Lots of good info here

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#9
Ooo thank you very much.

That was quite informative.

I hope I get through.
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